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Muskogee Union Railway, Alignment Through Port, Tps. 12-13N, Rg. 15 E.

Muskogee Union Railway, Alignment Through Port, Tps. 12-13N, Rg. 15 E.

Muskogee Union Railway, Alignment Through Port, Tps. 12-13N, Rg. 15 E.

Muskogee Union Railway, Alignment Through Port, Tps. 12-13N, Rg. 15 E.

Muskogee Union Railway, Alignment Through Port, Tps. 12-13N, Rg. 15 E.

A platform-mounted AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar antenna in use during joint readiness training exercise SOLID SHIELD '77

A view of a camouflaged AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar antenna located behind the Tactical Air Control Center during joint readiness training exercise SOLID SHIELD '77

A mobile radar installation is set up during joint readiness training exercise SOLID SHIELD '77. One truck-mounted AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar antenna is already up (lower left) while another is partially assembled (lower right)

A truck-mounted AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar antenna in use during joint readiness training exercise SOLID SHIELD '77

An aerial view of a platform-mounted AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar antenna in use during joint readiness training exercise SOLID SHIELD '77

An aerial view of a camouflaged AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar installation in use during joint readiness training exercise SOLID SHIELD '77

N-238 60MW Aerodynamic Heating Facility set up for TPS testing with T. Asta looking on through test section viewing window. ARC-1979-AC79-0283-4

An airman connects power cables to an AN/TPS-43E radar van atop Cerro Gordo during US Southern Command canal defense Black Fury II. Units of the Army, Navy and air Force are taking part in the exercise

Members of the 71st Tactical Control Flight begin to set up an AN/TPS-43E radar antenna atop Cerro Gordo during US Southern Command canal defense exercise Black Fury II. Units of the Army, Navy and Air Force are taking in the exercise

Advanced Space Shuttle TPS (Thermal Protection System) Plasma Stream during run in Arc Heater Facility ARC-1982-AC82-0121-4

Members of the 619th Tactical Control Flight erect a TPS-43E mobile radar antenna for a tactical evaluation exercise

AN/TPS-43E radar equipment is set up by personnel of the 622nd Tactical Control Flight, during Exercise UREX '82

MSGT David Kovach of the 622nd Tactical Control Flight, uses a tripod mounted device to line up AN/TPS-43E radar equipment into position during Exercise UREX '82

AN/TPS-43E radar equipment is set up by personnel of the 622nd Tactical Control Flight, during Exercise UREX '82

AN/TPS-43E radar equipment is set up by personnel of the 622nd Tactical Control Flight, during Exercise UREX '82

STAFF SGT. David Rowe, left, and SGT. David Funk operate a TPS-43 radar in an air control operation surveillance mode during the field training Exercise Quick Thrust

Members of the 104th Tactical Control Flight of the Oregon Air National Guard Set up an AN/TPS-43E tactical three-dimensional radar unit at the forward air control post during exercise Brim Frost '83

Members of the 104th Tactical Control Flight of the Oregon Air National Guard monitor radar screens in the control van of an AN/TPS-43E tactical three-dimensional radar unit during exercise Brim Frost '83. The radar unit is part of the forward air control post

Members of the 104th Tactical Control Flight (TCF) Forward Air Control Post (FACP) monitor TPS-43E radar scopes inside a control van during Exercise Brim Frost '83

Members of the 104th Tactical Control Flight (TCF) Forward Air Control Post (FACP) set up a TPS-43E radar antenna during Exercise Brim Frost '83

A member of the 104th Tactical Control Flight (TCF) Forward Air Control Post (FACP) set up a TPS-43E radar antenna during Exercise Brim Frost '83

Members of the 104th Tactical Control Flight (TCF) Forward Air Control Post (FACP) set up a TPS-43E radar antenna and control vans during Exercise Brim Frost '83

A member of the 104th Tactical Control Flight (TCF) Forward Air Control Post (FACP) participates in the set up of a TPS-43E radar antenna during Exercise Brim Frost '83

Members of the 104th Tactical Control Flight (TCF) Forward Air Control Post (FACP) set up a TPS-43E radar antenna during Exercise Brim Frost '83

Members of Marine Air Control Squadron 2 (MACS-2) erect an AN/TPS-63 tactical surveillance radar unit during Operation KERNAL BLITZ

Members of Marine Air Control Squadron 2 (MACS-2) set up an AN/TPS-63 tactical surveillance radar system during Operation KERNAL BLITZ

An AN/TPS-32 3-D long range surveillance radar system operated by Marine Air Control Squadron 2 (MACS-2) during Operation Kernal Blitz

Members of Marine Air Control Squadron 2 (MACS-2) erect an AN/TPS-32 3-D long-range surveillance radar system during Operation KERNAL BLITZ

An AN/TPS-63 tactical surveillance radar unit is operated by Marine Air Control Squadron 2 (MACS-2) during Operation KERNAL BLITZ

(Left to right) Technical Sergeant Greeting, AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Findley, and A1C Nelson erect the antenna of an AN/TPS-43E radar set

Personnel erect an AN/TPS-63 tactical surveillance radar during exercise Cope Canine '85

MAJ. John Patrick of the 129th Tactical Control Squadron, Georgia Air National Guard, monitors a radar screen in a TPS-43 shelter during the NATO Exercise Tactical Fighter Weaponry '89

Airmen of the 612th Tactical Control Flight (612th TCF) erect the antenna of an AN/TPS-43 tactical 3-D radar during the unit's final deployment in the Esenhut area. The 612th TCF is based at Zweibrucken Air Base, Germany, which is to be deactivated as a base for U.S. Air Force units

An Arab walks toward camouflaged equipment and AN/TPS-43 search radar in a U.S. military base camp during Operation Desert Shield

Studio portrait of Ames Developed Thermal Protection System (TPS) tiles - the RCG and TUFI ARC-1994-AC94-0116

Members of the 636th Tactical Control Flight, stationed at Wanna, set up an AN/TPS-43E tactical three-dimensional radar system while deployed at the Rockenhausen training area

US Air Force MASTER Sergeant Ronel Harvey, Non Commission Officer, Ground Radar System, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 early warning radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of the annual Tactical Fighter Weaponry exercise "TFW" and a NATO Air Meet. TFW and NATO Air Meet are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combined training environment

US Air Force MASTER Sergeant Ronel Harvey, Non Commission Officer, Ground Radar System, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 early warning radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of an annual Tactical Fighter Weaponry exercise "TFW" and a NATO Air Meet. TFW and NATO Air Meet are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

US Air Force MASTER Sergeant Ronel Harvey, Non Commission Officer, Ground Radar System, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 early warning radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of an annual Tactical Fighter Weaponry exercise "TFW" and a NATO Air Meet. TFW and NATO Air Meet are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

US Air Force members of Ground Radar Systems Flight, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 early warning radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of an annual Tactical Fighter Weaponry exercise "TFW" and a NATO Air Meet. TFW and NATO Air Meet are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

US Air Force MASTER Sergeant Ronel Harvey, Non Commission Officer, Ground Radar System, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 Early Warning Radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of the annual TACTICAL FIGHTER WEAPONRY Exercise "TFW" and a NATO AIR MEET. TFW and NATO AIR MEET are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

US Air Force MASTER Sergeant Ronel Harvey, Non Commission Officer, Ground Radar System, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 Early Warning Radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of the annual TACTICAL FIGHTER WEAPONRY Exercise "TFW" and a NATO AIR MEET. TFW and NATO AIR MEET are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

US Air Force MASTER Sergeant Ronel Harvey, Non Commission Officer, Ground Radar System, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, sets up the TPS-75 Early Warning Radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of an annual TACTICAL FIGHTER WEAPONRY Exercise "TFW" and a NATO AIR MEET. TFW and NATO AIR MEET are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

US Air Force members of Ground Radar Systems Flight, 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, set up the TPS-75 Early Warning Radar at Bovbjerg, Denmark. The 603rd is deployed to Denmark in support of the annual TACTICAL FIGHTER WEAPONRY Exercise "TFW" and a NATO AIR MEET. TFW and NATO AIR MEET are multinational exercises designed to practice and improve tactical capabilities in a combine training environment

AIRMAN 1ST Class Joshua Butcher, an Electronic Computer and Switching Systems Apprentice of the 603rd Air Communications Squadron, Aviano AB, Italy, perfroms a Preventative Maintenance Inspection (PMI) on the main data processing computer that controls all data processing functions of the Tactical Air Operations Module (TAOM). The TAOM is a mobile command and control center that is deployed in conjuction with the AN/TPS-75 Radar System. Both are assets of the 603rd and are vital in controlling the airspace in and around a forward deployed location

SENIOR AIRMAN Brandon Smith, an Electronic Computer and Switching Systems Journeyman of the 603rd Air Communications Squadron, Aviano AB, Italy, swaps out a suspected faulty magnetic focus card in an Operator Control Unit that interfaces an Air Controller with all functions of the Tactical Air Operations Module. The Tactical Air Operations Module is a mobile command and control center that is deployed in conjuction with the AN/TPS-75 Radar System. Both are assets of the 603rd which are vital in controlling the airspace in and around a forward deployed location

SENIOR AIRMAN Daxton Newberry, an Electronic Computer and Switching Systems Journeyman of the 603rd Air Communications Squadron, Aviano AB, Italy, swaps out a suspected faulty magnetic focus card in an Operator Control Unit that interfaces an Air Controller with all functions of the Tactical Air Operations Module. The Tactical Air Operations Module is a mobile command and control center that is deployed in conjuction with the AN/TPS-75 Radar System. Both are assets of the 603rd which are vital in controlling the airspace in and around a forward deployed location

US Air Force (USAF) personnel assigned to the 603rd Air Control Squadron, work on an AN/TPS-70 Tactical Radar Antenna at the initial set up site for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) training Exercise, TACTICAL FIGHTER WEAPONTRY01, at Tranum, Denmark

STAFF Sergeant Tommy Rhodes, with the 603rd Air Control Squadron, troubleshoots a TPS-75 radar support van, during the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) exercise, TACTICAL FIGHTER WEAPONRY 2001

Radar maintenance technician, SENIOR AIRMAN (SRA) Elvis Santana, 606th Air Control Squadron (ACS), Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, performs an antenna receiver performance check on a TPS-75

Ground radar systems apprentice, AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Dave Doughty, 606th Air Control Squadron (ACS) at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, erects a TPS-75 ground radar system

US Air Force (USAF) STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) James Warrack, Radar Maintenance Technician, 150th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, performs periodic maintenance on the AN/TPS-70 Mobile Tactical Radar at Kokee Air Force Station (AFS), located on the island of Kauai, HI

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) listens to Lee Zook (right) explaining use of the Dome Heat Shield blanket in front of them that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0327

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) greets Brenda Blackmon, a worker in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0323

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (third from left) talks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0330

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) meets workers. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0329

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0326

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (right) visits the Thermal Protection System Facility. At left is Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts.. KSC-03pd0332

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) speaks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0325

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) talks to Martin Wilson, project manager. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0324

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. From left is Glen Mahone, acting director for NASA Public Affairs, Jim Kennedy, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center, O'Keefe, Lee Zook, project leader, and Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0328

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), United Space Alliance (USA) employee Harrell Watts (right) installs Thermal Protection System (TPS) tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101). In the background, other USA employees, members of the OPF midbody TPS crew, prepare to install TPS tile on a simulated orbiter wing. The wing and the sections of Enterprise will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1066

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), United Space Alliance (USA) technician Mark Jetton installs Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a simulated orbiter wing. The wing, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1149

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), United Space Alliance (USA) technician Mark Jetton installs Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a simulated orbiter wing. The wing, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1148

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A main landing gear door mounting fixture in the Launch Equipment Shop is being used to support the Columbia mishap investigation. A simulated orbiter wing and several test panels, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1145

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), Paul King, an employee of The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., installs a strain gauge on a simulated orbiter wing in preparation for Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile installation. The wing, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1150

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance technician Matt Boonstra works on a main landing gear door mounting fixture in the Launch Equipment Shop. The fixture is being used to support the Columbia mishap investigation. A simulated orbiter wing and several test panels, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile installation on them is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1146

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), United Space Alliance (USA) technician Mark Jetton installs Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a simulated orbiter wing. The wing, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1151

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), United Space Alliance (USA) technician Mark Jetton installs Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a simulated orbiter wing. The wing, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1147

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, a member of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team places recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1153

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1152

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1154

Atlantis TPS Processing

Atlantis TPS Processing

Wearing a Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES), US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN (AMN) Jeremy Shulrud, a Ground Radar Systems Apprentice from the 606th Air Control Squadron (ACS), Spangdahlem Air Base (AB), Germany (DEU), keeps an open eye while in defense of his deployed TPS-75 mobile radar in support of Exercise Autumn Warrior '03

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, United Space Alliance (USA) Deputy Space Shuttle Program Manager of Operations Loren Shriver, USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, and USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro examine a tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) in KSC's TPS Facility. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Manager of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility Martin Wilson (right) briefs NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) on the properties of a thermal blanket used in the Shuttle's TPS. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (third from left) watch as a USA technician (right) creates a tile for use in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro are briefed on the properties of the tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) by USA Manager of the TPS Facility Martin Wilson (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Kennedy Parkway, which runs through KSC, a young bald eagle is spotted perched on the side of its nest. The nest is one of 12 active nests throughout the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with KSC. Young birds lack the typical white head, which they gain after several years. Nests are masses of sticks usually in the top of a tall tree. Their habitat is near lakes, rivers, marshes and seacoasts. KSC-04pd0629

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A closeup of the stitching being done on pieces of insulation blankets inside the ring that fits in the nose cap of Discovery. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0615

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance workers Ginger Morrison and Michael Williams stitch together pieces of insulation blankets inside the ring that fits in the nose cap of Discovery. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. KSC-04pd0613

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance workers Ginger Morrison and Michael Williams stitch together pieces of insulation blankets inside the ring that fits in the nose cap of Discovery. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0616

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis. In the foreground is a ring inside of which the blankets will be sewn to fit in the orbiter's nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0620

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis' nose cap. Behind her is a cover for the nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0621

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis's nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0618

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance workers Michael Williams and Ginger Morrison stitch together pieces of insulation blankets inside the ring that fits in the nose cap of Discovery. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0614

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center tour the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. At right is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1771

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. At left is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team, and at center is Martin Wilson, manager of the TPS operations. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1775

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. Near the center is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1772

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center tour the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. At left is Martin Wilson, manager of the TPS operations. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1770

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1774

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. Near the center is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1773

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Terri McCall cleans up equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1783