PICRYL
PICRYL

The World's Largest Public Domain Source

  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout

  • account_boxLogin

Rocket houston thrusters, science technology.

Rocket houston thrusters, science technology.

AS11-39-5843 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5843 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5809 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of Lunar Module thrusters and U.S. flag on lunar surface

AS11-39-5809 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of Lunar Module thrusters and U.S. flag on lunar surface

AS11-39-5818 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters and U.S. flag visible on lunar surface

AS11-39-5818 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters and U.S. flag visible on lunar surface

AS11-39-5842 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5842 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5808 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of Lunar Module thrusters and U.S. flag on lunar surface

AS11-39-5808 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of Lunar Module thrusters and U.S. flag on lunar surface

AS11-39-5794 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar module thrusters with lunar surface in background

AS11-39-5794 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar module thrusters with lunar surface in background

AS11-39-5797 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar module thrusters with lunar surface in background

AS11-39-5797 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar module thrusters with lunar surface in background

AS11-39-5817 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of Lunar Module thrusters visible on lunar surface

AS11-39-5817 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of Lunar Module thrusters visible on lunar surface

AS11-39-5841 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5841 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5819 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters and U.S. flag visible on lunar surface

AS11-39-5819 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters and U.S. flag visible on lunar surface

AS11-39-5784 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters on lunar surface

AS11-39-5784 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters on lunar surface

AS11-39-5840 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5840 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - LM thrusters and lunar surface

AS11-39-5785 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters on lunar surface

AS11-39-5785 - Apollo 11 - Apollo 11 Mission image - Shadow of LM thrusters on lunar surface

AS12-50-7373 - Apollo 12 - Apollo 12 Mission image - View Lunar Module (LM) thrusters

AS12-50-7373 - Apollo 12 - Apollo 12 Mission image  - View Lunar Module (LM) thrusters

AS15-91-12339 - Apollo 15 - Apollo 15 Mission image - SIVB stage is visible to the right of the Lunar Module (LM) thrusters

AS15-91-12339 - Apollo 15 - Apollo 15 Mission image - SIVB stage is visible to the right of the Lunar Module (LM) thrusters

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

POWER PROCESSORS FOR ION THRUSTERS

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

2 30CM CENTIMETER THRUSTERS - CUTAWAY VIEW AND TOTAL

ION THRUSTERS

ION THRUSTERS

ION THRUSTERS

ION THRUSTERS

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW OUTSIDE VIEW TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW  OUTSIDE VIEW  TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW OUTSIDE VIEW TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW  OUTSIDE VIEW  TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW OUTSIDE VIEW TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW  OUTSIDE VIEW  TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW OUTSIDE VIEW TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW  OUTSIDE VIEW  TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW OUTSIDE VIEW TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

10 FOOT BELL JAR INSIDE VIEW  OUTSIDE VIEW  TWO ION THRUSTERS MOUNTED INSIDE ROW OF EQUIPMENT ALONG SIDE

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III uses reverse thrusters to slow down during a landing on a desert runway at the National Training Center. The exercise was designed to test the ability of the C-17 to support mission requirements and interface with the Army

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III uses reverse thrusters to slow down during a landing on a desert runway at the National Training Center. The exercise was designed to test the ability of the C-17 to support mission requirements and interface with the Army

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III uses reverse thrusters to slow down during a landing on a desert runway at the National Training Center. The exercise was designed to test the ability of the C-17 to support mission requirements and interface with the Army

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III uses reverse thrusters to slow down during a landing on a desert runway at the National Training Center. The exercise was designed to test the ability of the C-17 to support mission requirements and interface with the Army

CAST CERAMIC THRUSTERS GRC-1998-C-01523

CAST CERAMIC THRUSTERS GRC-1998-C-01523

CAST CERAMIC THRUSTERS GRC-1998-C-01524

CAST CERAMIC THRUSTERS GRC-1998-C-01524

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, main engine No. 3 (bottom right) is being removed from Space Shuttle Discovery. Above it are (left) the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine, the reaction control thrusters (right), and the OMS pod (top). Last week, Shuttle managers determined that the engine was not acceptable for flight because a half-inch-long broken drill bit is lodged in the engine's coolant cavity. Therefore, the engine is being replaced. The Shuttle is expected to roll out to the pad at 2 a.m. Saturday morning, Nov. 13. The STS-103 launch is now targeted for Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST. The 10-day mission is expected to conclude at KSC on Dec. 16 with a 12:45 a.m. landing KSC-99pp1294

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, main engine No. 3 (bottom right) is being removed from Space Shuttle Discovery. Above it are (left) the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine, the reaction control thrusters (right), and the OMS pod (top). Last week, Shuttle managers determined that the engine was not acceptable for flight because a half-inch-long broken drill bit is lodged in the engine's coolant cavity. Therefore, the engine is being replaced. The Shuttle is expected to roll out to the pad at 2 a.m. Saturday morning, Nov. 13. The STS-103 launch is now targeted for Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST. The 10-day mission is expected to conclude at KSC on Dec. 16 with a 12:45 a.m. landing KSC-99pp1294

STS106-348-009 - STS-106 - Views of the thrusters, sensors and antennas on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-348-009 - STS-106 - Views of the thrusters, sensors and antennas on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-348-008 - STS-106 - Views of the thrusters, sensors and antennas on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-348-008 - STS-106 - Views of the thrusters, sensors and antennas on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-348-010 - STS-106 - Views of the thrusters, sensors and antennas on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-348-010 - STS-106 - Views of the thrusters, sensors and antennas on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0413

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0413

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0413

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0413

Machined Copper CGR-84 Thrusters GRC-2007-C-00275

Machined Copper CGR-84 Thrusters GRC-2007-C-00275

Machined Copper CGR-84 Thrusters GRC-2007-C-00276

Machined Copper CGR-84 Thrusters GRC-2007-C-00276

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to remove one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to remove one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.  OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to remove one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to remove one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods removed from Endeavour is lowered toward a transporter. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods removed from Endeavour is lowered toward a transporter.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet.  Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Technicians in the Orbiter Processing Facility oversee removal of one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Technicians in the Orbiter Processing Facility oversee removal of one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet.  Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods removed from Endeavour is lowered onto a transporter. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods removed from Endeavour is lowered onto a transporter.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet.  Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Technicians in the Orbiter Processing Facility oversee removal of one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Technicians in the Orbiter Processing Facility oversee removal of one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet.  Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to remove one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to  remove one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods from Endeavour.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods removed from Endeavour is suspended overhead. The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides. Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet. Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts. OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   In the Orbiter Processing Facility, one of two orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods removed from Endeavour is suspended overhead.  The OMS pods are attached to the upper aft fuselage left and right sides.  Fabricated primarily of graphite epoxy composite and aluminum, each pod is 21.8 feet long and 11.37 feet wide at its aft end and 8.41 feet wide at its forward end, with a surface area of approximately 435 square feet.  Each pod houses the Reaction Control System propulsion components used for inflight maneuvering and is attached to the aft fuselage with 11 bolts.   OMS pods are removed during Orbiter Major Modifications. Once removed, the OMS pods undergo in-depth structural inspections, system checks and the thrusters are changed out.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers complete rotation of the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0678

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers complete rotation of the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0678

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers make adjustments to the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now resting on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0671

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers make adjustments to the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now resting on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0671

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers adjust wires on the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft during rotation on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0676

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers adjust wires on the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft during rotation on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0676

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers check the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft after completing rotation on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0679

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers check the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft after completing rotation on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0679

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers begin to rotate the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0674

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers begin to rotate the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0674

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers begin to rotate the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0673

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers begin to rotate the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0673

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- - Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers check the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft as it rotates on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0675

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- - Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers check the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft  as it rotates on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0675

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers remove protective covers from the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now resting on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0672

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers remove protective covers from the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now resting on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0672

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers again rotate the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0677

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers again rotate the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft on the turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0677

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers help while an overhead crane lowers the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft onto a turnover fixture. Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site. Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0670

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations facilities near KSC, workers help while an overhead crane lowers the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft onto a turnover fixture.  Workers will perform the propulsion system phasing test - firing gas through the thrusters in order to verify that the right thrusters fire when expected - as part of prelaunch testing at the site.  Launch is scheduled for May 11 from Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The spacecraft will fly past Venus three times and Mercury twice before starting a year-long orbital study of Mercury in July 2009. KSC-04pd0670

AS13-62-8941 - Apollo 13 - Apollo 13 Mission image - View of RCS Quad Thrusters

AS13-62-8941 - Apollo 13 - Apollo 13 Mission image  - View of RCS Quad Thrusters

AS14-72-9925 - Apollo 14 - Apollo 14 Mission image - View of the Lunar Module(LM) Thrusters.

AS14-72-9925 - Apollo 14 - Apollo 14 Mission image - View of the Lunar Module(LM) Thrusters.

AS13-60-8583 - Apollo 13 - Apollo 13 Mission image - View of the Saturn IV Booster (SIVB) with the Lunar Module (LM) thrusters in the foreground.

AS13-60-8583 - Apollo 13 - Apollo 13 Mission image  - View of the Saturn IV Booster (SIVB) with the Lunar Module (LM) thrusters in the foreground.

AS13-62-8954 - Apollo 13 - Apollo 13 Mission image - View of Earth crescent with RCS Quad Thrusters

AS13-62-8954 - Apollo 13 - Apollo 13 Mission image  - View of Earth crescent with RCS Quad Thrusters

AS14-72-9926 - Apollo 14 - Apollo 14 Mission image - View of the Lunar Module(LM) Thrusters.

AS14-72-9926 - Apollo 14 - Apollo 14 Mission image - View of the Lunar Module(LM) Thrusters.

AS16-118-18882 - Apollo 16 - Apollo 16 Mission image - The SIVB (Third stage [IVB] of Saturn Launch vehicle) stage after Lunar Module (LM) ejection. Lunar Module (LM) thrusters.

AS16-118-18882 - Apollo 16 - Apollo 16 Mission image - The SIVB (Third stage [IVB] of Saturn Launch vehicle) stage after Lunar Module (LM) ejection. Lunar Module (LM) thrusters.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, the Dawn spacecraft is on display for a media showing. On each side are the folded solar array panels. At the top is the high gain antenna, covered by a sun shade. At the bottom, also under cover, is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Behind the antenna on the outside edge are the framing cameras, which are the scientific imaging system of the Dawn Mission. Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1600

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, the Dawn spacecraft is on display for a media showing.  On each side are the folded solar array panels. At the top is the high gain antenna, covered by a sun shade.  At the bottom, also under cover, is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Behind the antenna on the outside edge are the framing cameras, which are the scientific imaging system of the Dawn Mission.  Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres.  They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1600

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, technicians prepare the Dawn spacecraft for a media showing. On each side are the folded solar array panels. At the top is the high gain antenna, covered by a sun shade. At the bottom is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1600A

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, technicians prepare the Dawn spacecraft for a media showing.  On each side are the folded solar array panels. At the top is the high gain antenna, covered by a sun shade.  At the bottom is one of the ion propulsion thrusters.  Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres.  They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1600A

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, the Dawn spacecraft is on display for a media showing. On each side are the folded solar array panels. At the top is the high gain antenna, covered by a sun shade. At the bottom, also under cover, is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Behind the antenna on the outside edge are the framing cameras. Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1599

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, the Dawn spacecraft is on display for a media showing.  On each side are the folded solar array panels. At the top is the high gain antenna, covered by a sun shade.  At the bottom, also under cover, is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Behind the antenna on the outside edge are the framing cameras.  Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres.  They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1599

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, the Dawn spacecraft is on display for a media showing. On each side are the folded solar array panels. The "box" in the upper center is the visual and infrared mapping spectrometer, which is designed to measure how much radiation of different "colors" is reflected or emitted by an object. At the bottom, under cover, is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1598

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech, the Dawn spacecraft is on display for a media showing.   On each side are the folded solar array panels.  The "box" in the upper center is the visual and infrared mapping spectrometer, which is designed to measure how much radiation of different "colors" is reflected or emitted by an object.  At the bottom, under cover, is one of the ion propulsion thrusters. Dawn's goal is to characterize the conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating in detail the largest protoplanets that have remained intact since their formations: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres.  They reside in the extensive zone between Mars and Jupiter together with many other smaller bodies, called the asteroid belt.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1598

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module has been placed on the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida after its arrival. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1442

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   The Ares I-X roll control system module has been placed on the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida after its arrival.  The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters.  The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1442

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers look at the Ares I-X roll control system module before removing the plastic wrap. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1443

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers look at the Ares I-X roll control system module before removing the plastic wrap. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters.  The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1443

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module arrives in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1441

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X roll control system module arrives in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters.  The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1441

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module is revealed after removal of the plastic wrap. The module is in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1445

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X roll control system module is revealed after removal of the plastic wrap.  The module is in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters.  The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1445

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers start removing the plastic wrap from the Ares I-X roll control system module. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1444

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  On the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers start removing the plastic wrap from the Ares I-X roll control system module. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. Part of the upper stage simulator, the system module is composed to two modules and four thrusters.  The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1444

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being prepared for a fit check on the Ares I-X rocket upper stage simulator. The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1532

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being prepared for a fit check on the Ares I-X rocket upper stage simulator.  The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1532

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being prepared for a fit check on the Ares I-X rocket upper stage simulator. The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1530

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being prepared for a fit check on the Ares I-X rocket upper stage simulator.  The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1530

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being moved toward the upper stage simulator for a fit check. The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1533

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being moved toward the upper stage simulator for a fit check. The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1533

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being prepared for a fit check on the Ares I-X rocket upper stage simulator. The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1531

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X roll control system module, comprising two modules and four thrusters, is being prepared for a fit check on the Ares I-X rocket upper stage simulator.  The hardware is in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The system is designed to perform a 90-degree roll after the rocket clears the launch tower, preventing a roll during flight and maintaining the orientation of the rocket until separation of the upper and first stages. The system module will return to earth and splash down; it will not be recovered.  Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond.  Ares I-X is targeted for launch in summer of 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1531

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A large team of specialists works methodically through procedures to "safe" Endeavour as it sits on the runway after landing to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Trucks are positioned at the shuttle’s nose and tail to drain away hazardous chemicals that may still be inside systems such as the thrusters. Later, the astronauts are expected to walk around Endeavour. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4307

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  A large team of specialists works methodically through procedures to "safe" Endeavour as it sits on the runway after landing to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Trucks are positioned at the shuttle’s nose and tail to drain away hazardous chemicals that may still be inside systems such as the thrusters. Later, the astronauts are expected to walk around Endeavour.  Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4307

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, around space shuttle Discovery in order to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters. The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4868

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, around space shuttle Discovery in order to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters.   The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4868

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers begin closing the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, around space shuttle Discovery in order to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters. The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4867

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers begin closing the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, around space shuttle Discovery in order to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters.   The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4867

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers close the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, around space shuttle Discovery in order to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters. The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4869

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers close the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, around space shuttle Discovery in order to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters.   The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4869

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, closes around space shuttle Discovery. Workers are preparing to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters. The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4870

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, closes around space shuttle Discovery. Workers are preparing to replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters.   The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4870

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, is closed around space shuttle Discovery. Workers next will replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters. The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4872

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Rotating Service Structure, or RSS, is closed around space shuttle Discovery. Workers next will replace the Tyvek covers protecting the shuttle's nose thrusters. The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. First motion was at approximately 4:15 p.m. EDT. The work to cover the thrusters is expected to take six to seven hours. When completed, the team will move the RSS to the park position in preparation for Discovery's targeted launch attempt on Aug. 28 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-2009-4872

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians have removed the protective wrapping from all of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4877

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians have removed the protective wrapping from all of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars.          A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life.  The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4877

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians begin to unwrap the protective cover from NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4869

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians begin to unwrap the protective cover from NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars.          A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life.  The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4869

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians remove the protective wrapping from the next set of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4875

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians remove the protective wrapping from the next set of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars.        A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life.  The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4875

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians remove the protective wrapping from the next set of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4876

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians remove the protective wrapping from the next set of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars.        A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life.  The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4876

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians have unwrapped the protective cover from NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4871

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- At the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians have unwrapped the protective cover from NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rocket-powered descent stage thrusters for documenting and inspection. The descent stage will fly the MSL rover, Curiosity, during the final moments before landing on Mars.        A United Launch Alliance Atlas V-541 configuration will be used to loft MSL into space. Curiosity’s 10 science instruments are designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life.  The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser KSC-2011-4871

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1597

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1597

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1596

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1596

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1595

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1595

CANOGA PARK, Calif. -- Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne hot-fires a launch abort engine for The Boeing Co., which is developing its CST-100 spacecraft for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. Under its fixed-price contract with Boeing, Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne is combining its Attitude Control Propulsion System thrusters from heritage spaceflight programs, Bantam abort engine design and storable propellant engineering capabilities. In 2011, NASA selected Boeing of Houston during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, Blue Origin, Excalibur Almaz Inc., Sierra Nevada Corp., Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne KSC-2012-1828

CANOGA PARK, Calif. -- Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne hot-fires a launch abort engine for The Boeing Co., which is developing its CST-100 spacecraft for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. Under its fixed-price contract with Boeing, Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne is combining its Attitude Control Propulsion System thrusters from heritage spaceflight programs, Bantam abort engine design and storable propellant engineering capabilities. In 2011, NASA selected Boeing of Houston during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, Blue Origin, Excalibur Almaz Inc., Sierra Nevada Corp., Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne KSC-2012-1828