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In this aerial view looking south can be seen Launch Complex (LC) 39 area, where assembly, checkout and launch of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and its External Tank and twin Solid Rocket Boosters take place. Central to the complex is the tallest building at the center, the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). To the immediate left, from top to bottom, are the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) High Bay 3 and new engine shop (north side), OPF Modular Office Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and a crawler-transporter (to its left). In front of the VAB are OPF 1 and OPF 2. At right is the Processing Control Center. West of OPF 3 is the Mobile Launch Platform. In the upper left corner is Launch Pad B; at the far right is the turn basin, with the Press Site located just below it to the right. KSC-98PC-1043

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) listens to Lee Zook (right) explaining use of the Dome Heat Shield blanket in front of them that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0327

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) greets Brenda Blackmon, a worker in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0323

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (third from left) talks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0330

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) meets workers. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0329

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0326

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (right) visits the Thermal Protection System Facility. At left is Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts.. KSC-03pd0332

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) speaks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0325

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) talks to Martin Wilson, project manager. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0324

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. From left is Glen Mahone, acting director for NASA Public Affairs, Jim Kennedy, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center, O'Keefe, Lee Zook, project leader, and Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry. TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0328

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis. In the foreground is a ring inside of which the blankets will be sewn to fit in the orbiter's nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0620

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis' nose cap. Behind her is a cover for the nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0621

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis's nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0618

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis. In the foreground is a nose ring that will be fitted with the blankets and inserted in the nose cap. In the background on a stand is a cover for the nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0619

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Pilar Ryan, with United Space Alliance, stitches a piece of insulation blanket for Atlantis. The blankets will be sewn into the inside of a ring that will be inserted in the nose cap. In the background is a cover for the nose cap. The blankets consist of layered, pure silica felt sandwiched between a layer of silica fabric (the hot side) and a layer of S-Glass fabric. The blankets are semi-rigid and can be made as large as 30 inches by 30 inches. The blanket is through-stitched with pure silica thread in a 1-inch grid pattern. After fabrication, the blanket is bonded directly to the vehicle structure and finally coated with a high purity silica coating that improves erosion resistance. KSC-04pd0617

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees clean up inside the second floor of the Thermal Protection System Facility damaged by Hurricane Frances. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. Located in Launch Complex 39, the facility is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. KSC-04pd1723

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The second floor of the Thermal Protection System Facility sustained significant damage from Hurricane Frances. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. Located in Launch Complex 39, the facility is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. KSC-04pd1726

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees clean up inside the second floor of the Thermal Protection System Facility damaged by Hurricane Frances. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. Located in Launch Complex 39, the facility is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. KSC-04pd1724

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC workers survey the considerable damage sustained by the second floor of the Thermal Protection System Facility from Hurricane Frances. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. Located in Launch Complex 39, the facility is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. KSC-04pd1727

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees clean up inside the second floor of the Thermal Protection System Facility damaged by Hurricane Frances. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. Located in Launch Complex 39, the facility is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. KSC-04pd1722

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees move equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1744

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees move equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1737

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is moved into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1739

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A KSC employee unpacks and sorts equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, to a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1742

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A KSC employee moves equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1738

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees check out equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, to a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1740

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is moved into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1736

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees move equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1746

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees move equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1747

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is relocated to a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1733

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is relocated to a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1745

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A KSC employee uses a fork lift to move equipment relocated from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, inside a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1741

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fork lift is available to move equipment relocated from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, inside a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1743

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is moved into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1734

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is moved into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1732

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), damaged by Hurricane Frances, is moved into a hangar and storage facility near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Previously, this hangar was used to house the Space Shuttle Columbia debris. Located in Launch Complex 39, the TPSF is used to manufacture both internal and external insulation products for the Space Shuttle orbiters. The storm's path over Florida took it through Cape Canaveral and KSC property during Labor Day weekend. KSC-04pd1735

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Terri McCall cleans up equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1783

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills stores equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in the RLV hangar at KSC. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment has been moved to the hangar. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1779

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Beth Smith (left) and Theresa Haygood unwrap equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1781

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Repair crews clean up debris at the railroad yard left behind after Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC sustained damage to the south wall and roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building plus the roof of the Thermal Protection System Facility. KSC-04pd1802

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Frank Rhodes and Lynn Rosenbauer look at wrapped material removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1782

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harrington talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the hangar. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1785

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Matt Carter (left) and Mike Sherman set up racks to hold equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1784

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance worker Steve Mitchell unpacks equipment that was removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1780

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers set up shelves for equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) and now being stored in the hangar. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1792

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty carry out equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment is being moved to the RLV hangar at KSC. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1777

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills works on equipment in the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar at KSC. The hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1793

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia debris hangar at KSC, a United Space Alliance worker lines up air heaters salvaged from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in order to dry them out. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment has been moved to the RLV hangar at KSC. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1778

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Repair crews clean up debris left behind after Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC sustained damage to the south wall and roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building plus the roof of the Thermal Protection System Facility. KSC-04pd1800

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged facility. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1790

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty clean up hurricane debris inside the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). Much of the roof was torn off by Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. Undamaged equipment has been moved to the RLV hangar at KSC. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1776

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harrington talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the hangar. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1786

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Repair crews clean up debris left behind after Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. Hurricane damage sustained at KSC included the south wall and roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building plus the roof of the Thermal Protection System Facility. KSC-04pd1799

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged facility. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1791

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Kathy Evans works on equipment in the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar at KSC. The hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1794

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A repair crew replaces a light fixture damaged by Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. Hurricane damage sustained at KSC included the south wall and roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building plus the roof of the Thermal Protection System Facility. KSC-04pd1798

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). Here United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1789

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A repair crew replaces a light fixture damaged by Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC sustained damage to the south wall and roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building plus the roof of the Thermal Protection System Facility. KSC-04pd1801

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Kevin Harrington, manager of Softgoods Production, talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the hangar. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1788

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) looks at equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility to the RLV Hangar. At left are United Space Alliance technicians Shelly Kipp and Eric Moss. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1843

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (left, in foreground), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), gives a tour of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility to (from center) NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, Center Director James Kennedy and Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. O’Keefe and Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1850

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director of Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (left) talks to NASA Associate Administrator of the Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy at the Shuttle Landing Facility. NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances over Labor Day weekend. The Vehicle Assembly Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and Processing Control Center all received significant damage from the storm. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1832

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director of the Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (left) and NASA Associate Administrator of the Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy examine one of the panels that was blown off the Vehicle Assembly Building. NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances over Labor Day weekend. The Vehicle Assembly Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and Processing Control Center all received significant damage from the storm. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft, awaiting launch in October, were well protected and unharmed. KSC-04pd1837

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The helicopter carrying NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and KSC Director of Spaceport Services Scott Kerr passes by the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to observe the damage inflicted by Hurricane Frances over the Labor Day weekend. The VAB lost approximately 850 tiles on the south wall, seen here. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The storm also caused significant damage to the Thermal Protection System Facility and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1847

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe examines one of the panels that was blown off the Vehicle Assembly Building. O’Keefe is visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances over Labor Day weekend. The Vehicle Assembly Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and Processing Control Center all received significant damage from the storm. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft, awaiting launch in October, were well protected and unharmed. KSC-04pd1838

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage inside the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility are KSC Director of Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (left) and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy (right). The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Readdy and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1851

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) sits next to KSC Director of Spaceport Services Scott Kerr in the helicopter from which they will observe overall damage at the Center from Hurricane Frances. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The Labor Day storm caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1846

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (second from right), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), briefs NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore and Center Director James Kennedy about the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar. At far right is USA Manager of Soft Goods Production in the TPSF, Kevin Harrington. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1841

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Martin Wilson (second from right), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), briefs NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore and Center Director James Kennedy about the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar.  At far right is USA Manager of Soft Goods Production in the TPSF, Kevin Harrington. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1841
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (second from right), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), briefs NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore and Center Director James Kennedy about the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar. At far right is USA Manager of Soft Goods Production in the TPSF, Kevin Harrington. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1841

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - United Space Alliance technician Shelly Kipp (right) shows some of the material salvaged from the storm-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (left). Martin Wilson (center), manager of TPS operations for USA, looks on. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1845

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (second from right), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA) , introduces Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production in the TPSF, during a briefing to (from left) NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore, Center Director James Kennedy and KSC Director of the Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (behind Kennedy), on the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1840

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Martin Wilson (second from right), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA) , introduces Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production in the TPSF, during a briefing to (from left) NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore, Center Director James Kennedy and KSC Director of the Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (behind Kennedy), on the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar.  O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1840
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (second from right), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA) , introduces Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production in the TPSF, during a briefing to (from left) NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore, Center Director James Kennedy and KSC Director of the Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (behind Kennedy), on the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1840

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Michael E. Wetmore (left) greets NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe upon his arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility. O’Keefe is visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances over Labor Day weekend. Center Director Jim Kennedy (center) was also on hand to welcome O’Keefe. The Vehicle Assembly Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and Processing Control Center all received significant damage from the storm. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1831

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe looks at equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility to the RLV Hangar. AT right is Martin Wilson, manager of TPS operations for United Space Alliance. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1842

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (far left), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), leads NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (second from left) on a tour of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1849

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe looks at images of damaged KSC facilities in the RLV Hangar before surveying the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances over Labor Day weekend. The Vehicle Assembly Building, Thermal Protection System Facility, and Processing Control Center all received significant damage from the storm. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft, awaiting launch in October, were well protected and unharmed. KSC-04pd1834

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance, briefs NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of the Spaceport Services Scott Kerr, NASA Associate Administrator of the Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy, and Center Director James Kennedy (right) on the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar. O’Keefe and Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft, awaiting launch in October, were well protected and unharmed. KSC-04pd1839

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage on the second floor of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) are (from left) Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production, TPSF ; Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System operations for USA; Scott Kerr, KSC director of Spaceport Services; and James Kennedy, Center director. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1852

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Looking at damage on the second floor of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) are (from left) Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production, TPSF ; Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System operations for USA; Scott Kerr, KSC director of Spaceport Services; and James Kennedy, Center director.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane.  The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1852
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage on the second floor of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) are (from left) Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production, TPSF ; Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System operations for USA; Scott Kerr, KSC director of Spaceport Services; and James Kennedy, Center director. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center. Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1852

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers attempt to secure the roof of the Tile Shop in the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in preparation for Hurricane Jeanne, which is expected to impact Central Florida Sunday. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, lost approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4. Jeanne is the fourth hurricane in 45 days to make landfall somewhere in the state. KSC-04pd1902

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Jeanne, workers in the Reusable Launch Vehicle Hangar unroll long pieces of plastic to place on shelves holding Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) equipment. Jeanne is expected to impact Central Florida Sunday. This is the fourth hurricane in 45 days to make landfall somewhere in the state. The TPSF suffered extensive damage from Hurricane Frances, causing the relocation of equipment and materials to the hangar. KSC-04pd1885

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Employees at NASA Kennedy Space Center move equipment into the Thermal Protection System facility that has recently been repaired. The upper floor of the facility, where soft material was processed, was damaged during the 2004 hurricanes and the equipment was temporarily moved to the RLV Hangar. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2516

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Employees at NASA Kennedy Space Center move a blanket sewing machine into the Thermal Protection System facility. that has recently been repaired. The upper floor of the facility, where soft material was processed, was damaged during the 2004 hurricanes and the equipment was temporarily moved to the RLV Hangar. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2517

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Tim Wright, engineering manager with United Space Alliance, tests a new tile, called "Boeing replacement insulation" or "BRI-18." The new tiles will gradually replace older tiles around main landing gear doors, external tank doors and nose landing gear doors. Currently, 10 tiles have been processed inside the facility. Discovery will receive the first BRI-18 tiles. Technicians inside the Orbiter Processing Facility are performing fit checks and will begin bonding the tiles to the vehicle this month. The raw material is manufactured by The Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, Calif. Replacing older tile with the BRI-18 tile in strategic areas is one of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's recommendations to strengthen the orbiters. The tiles are more impact resistant than previous designs, enhancing the crew’s safety. KSC-06pd0022

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Thermal Protection System Facility, Tim Wright, engineering manager with United Space Alliance, tests a new tile, called "Boeing replacement insulation" or "BRI-18." The new tiles will gradually replace older tiles around main landing gear doors, external tank doors and nose landing gear doors. Currently, 10 tiles have been processed inside the facility. Discovery will receive the first BRI-18 tiles. Technicians inside the Orbiter Processing Facility are performing fit checks and will begin bonding the tiles to the vehicle this month. The raw material is manufactured by The Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, Calif. Replacing older tile with the BRI-18 tile in strategic areas is one of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's recommendations to strengthen the orbiters. The tiles are more impact resistant than previous designs, enhancing the crew’s safety. KSC-06pd0021

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery -- its nose encased in protective plastic, its cockpit windows covered, and strongbacks attached to its payload bay doors -- rolls past the Thermal Protection System Facility, at right, on its way from Orbiter Processing Facility-2, or OPF-2, to the Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB. Discovery will be stored inside the VAB for approximately one month while shuttle Atlantis undergoes processing in OPF-2 following its final mission, STS-135. Discovery flew its 39th and final mission, STS-133, in February and March 2011, and currently is being prepared for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. For more information about Discovery's Transition and Retirement, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/discovery_rss_collection_archive_1.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-5542

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are manufactured inside the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The insulation includes thermal barriers that are used around hatches, thrusters and other open areas of the backshell to protect the joints from heat. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1597

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Frank Pelkey, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, inspects a heat shield tile that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1590

Tim Wright, a United Space Alliance engineering manager at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, unpacks the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The tiles are being manufactured and inspected in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. The tiles will be baked at 2,200 degrees F to cure their ceramic coating. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1572

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are in a Keith thermal automation oven in the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Inside the oven, the tiles will be baked at 2,200 degrees F to cure their ceramic coating. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1575

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Frank Pelkey, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, inspects a heat shield tile that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1591

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are being manufactured in the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1580

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chris Keeling, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manufactures the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1579

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- United Space Alliance workers, Tim Wright, left, and Chris Keeling, manufacture the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1593

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chris Keeling, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manufactures the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1578

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are removed from a Keith thermal automation oven. Inside, the tiles were baked at 2,200 degrees F to cure their ceramic coating. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1587

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chris Keeling, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manufactures the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1581

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- -- Tim Wright, a United Space Alliance engineering manager at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, explains the properties of the thermal barriers that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1598

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chris Keeling, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manufactures the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1582

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chris Keeling, a United Space Alliance technician at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manufactures the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1584

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Tim Wright, a United Space Alliance engineering manager at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, explains the properties of the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1588

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Tim Wright, a United Space Alliance engineering manager at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, put the heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule in a Keith thermal automation oven. The tiles will be baked at 2,200 degrees F to cure their ceramic coating. The work to manufacture and inspect the tiles is taking place in Kennedy's Thermal Protection System Facility. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1574

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield tiles that will be installed to the backshell of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Flight Test EFT-1 capsule are in a Keith thermal automation oven in the Thermal Protection System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Inside the oven, the tiles will be baked at 2,200 degrees F to cure their ceramic coating. EFT-1 will be used during Orion's first test flight in space. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2012-1576