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A steam harvester at work cutting a 25 foot swath, California, U.S.A.

A steam harvester at work cutting a 25 foot swath, California, U.S.A.

"Duster" (plane spraying insecticide) over a field of beans. The mechanic in the foreground indicates the outside limit of the last "swath" which has settled by the time the plane returns. Note how low the plane flies. Bean fields like this, hundreds of acres in extent, are plowed, planted, cultivated, and even harvested by tractors. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton and Vineland, New Jersey

Dusting plane hedge-hopping after spraying swath on beanfield. These planes can spray 100 acres an hour, can usually fly one or two hours unless it rains or storms in an average day. The ususal traveling "dusting circus" has at least three or four planes, its own pilots, mechanics and elementary repair shop. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton and Vineland, New Jersey

Dusting plane hedge-hopping after spraying swath on beanfield. These planes can spray 100 acres an hour, can usually fly one or two hours unless it rains or storms in an average day. The usual traveling "dusting circus" has at least three or four planes, its own pilots, mechanics and elementary repair shop. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton and Vineland, New Jersey

"Duster" plane spraying insecticide over a field of beans. The mechanic in the foreground indicates the outside limit of the last "swath" which has settled by the time the plane returns. Note how low the plane flies. Beanfields like this, hundreds of acres in extent, are plowed, planted cultivated and even harvested by tractors. Seabrook Farms, Bridgeton, and Vineland, New Jersey

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Dusting plane hedge-hopping after spraying swath on beanfield. These planes can spray 100 acres an hour, can usually fly one or two hours unless it rains or storms in an average day. The usual traveling "dusting circus" has at least three or four planes, its own pilots, mechanics and elementary repair shop. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton and Vineland, New Jersey

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Duster plane spraying insecticide over a field of beans. The mechanic in the foreground indicates the outside limit of the last "swath" which has settled by the time the plane returns. Note how low the plane flies. Bean fields like this, hundreds of acres in extent, are plowed, cultivated and even harvested by tractors. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton, and Vineland, New Jersey

"Duster" plane spraying insecticide over a field of beans. The mechanic in the foreground indicates the outside limit of the last "swath" which has settled by the time the plane returns. Note how low the plane flies. Beanfields like this, hundreds of acres in extent, are plowed, planted cultivated and even harvested by tractors. Seabrook Farms, Bridgeton, and Vineland, New Jersey

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Dusting plane hedge-hopping after spraying swath on beanfield. These planes can spray 100 acres an hour, can usually fly one or two hours unless it rains or storms in an average day. The usual traveling "dusting circus" has at least three or four planes, its own pilots, mechanics and elementary repair shop. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton and Vineland, New Jersey

Dusting plane hedge-hopping after spraying swath on beanfield. These planes can spray 100 acres an hour, can usually fly one or two hours unless it rains or storms in an average day. The ususal traveling "dusting circus" has at least three or four planes, its own pilots, mechanics and elementary repair shop. Seabrook Farms, between Bridgeton and Vineland, New Jersey

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Opening ceremonies of the Alcan Highway at Soldiers' Summit, a stretch of the highway 1500 feet above the wide swath of Kluane Lake, which is approximately 100 miles east of the Alaskan-Yukon international boundary

Opening ceremonies of the Alcan Highway at Soldiers' Summit, a stretch of highway 1500 feet above the wide swath of Kluane Lake, which is approximately 100 miles east of the Alaska-Yukon international boundary

An artist's concept of a battle cruiser (CGH-67) with the SWATH (small waterplane area twin hulls) configuration

An artist's concept of an undersea surveillance combatant ship showing the SWATH (small waterplane area twin hulls) configuration

Air Force personnel sift through the wreckage of an Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker that cut a 30-by-100-yard swath through the jungle on San Juan Hill. The aircraft, of the 305th Air Refueling Wing at Grissom Air Force Base, Indiana, crashed on San Juan Hill after missing an approach at Howard Air Force Base. All four crew members perished in the accident.

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc279

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc278

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc284

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc280

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc282

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc283

The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission KSC-97pc281

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc228

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc223

STS089-S-005 (22 Jan. 1998) --- The space shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Mir Space Station. Endeavour lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 9:48:15 p.m. (EST), Jan. 22, 1998. STS-89 represents the eighth docking mission with Mir (all previous such flights utilized the Atlantis). After the docking with Mir, Andrew S. W. Thomas, mission specialist, will transfer to the station, succeeding astronaut David A. Wolf as guest cosmonaut researcher. Wolf will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Thomas is expected to live and work on Mir until June 1998. Other crew members onboard were Terrence W. Wilcutt, Joe F. Edwards Jr., Bonnie J. Dunbar, James F. Reilly, Michael P. Anderson and Salizhan S. Sharipov. Sharipov represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Photo credit: NASA sts089-s-005

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc224

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc221

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc229

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc220

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc222

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-pa-sts-89

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc225

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc227

A Swath of Eros

Aerial quarter starboard stern view of the Lockheed-Martin experimental Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) ship Sea Slice, operating off the coast of Port Hueneme, California (CA) during Fleet Battle Experiment Juliet (FBE-J), conducted during Exercise MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE 2002 (MC-02). Millennium Challenge is the nation's premier joint integrating event, bringing together both live field exercises and computer simulations throughout the Department of Defense

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour, painting a swath of light on nearby water, blazes into the night sky on mission STS-113. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred ontime at 7:49:47 p.m. EST. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Also onboard are the Expedition 6 crew, who will replace Expedition 5. Endeavour is scheduled to land at KSC after an 11-day journey. KSC-02pp1817

Radar Swath of Oct. 28, 2005, Titan Flyby

An aerial view of the experimental Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) ship Sea SLICE as it returns to its homeport of Naval Station San Diego.

An aerial view of the Tugboat HARBOR COMMANDER, Pacific Tugboat Services, pushing the experimental Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) ship Sea SLICE on its returns to homeport at Naval Station (NS) San Diego. The SLICE is a new, patented ship technology that enables SWATH ships to operate at higher speeds while retaining their characteristic low motions in a seaway. SLICE technologys key innovation is reduction of wave making drag, accomplished by its four teardrop-shaped submerged hulls

An aerial view of the Tugboat HARBOR COMMANDER, Pacific Tugboat Services, pushing the experimental Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) ship Sea SLICE on its return to homeport at Naval Station (NS) San Diego. The SLICE is a new, patented ship technology that enables SWATH ships to operate at higher speeds while retaining their characteristic low motions in a seaway. SLICE technologys key innovation is reduction of wave making drag, accomplished by its four teardrop-shaped submerged hulls

An aerial view of the experimental Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) ship Sea SLICE as it returns to its homeport of Naval Station San Diego.

The Honorable Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), U.S. Senator from Alaska, shows a piece of steel with her welded name during the keel laying ceremony for the Office of Naval Research funded Expeditionary Craft (E-Craft) Sealifter (MV) SUSITNA, at Ketchikan Shipyard, Alaska, on Aug. 24, 2006. The design of the E-Craft incorporates lift technology that will allow the ferry to change from Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) mode to barge mode by lowering or raising its center deck. Also in the photo are Randy Johnson, left, President, Alaska Ship and Drydock, and U.S. Navy Rear Adm. William E. Landay, CHIEF of Naval Research. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams) (Released)

The Honorable Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), U.S. Senator from Alaska, gives her remarks during the keel laying ceremony for the Office of Naval Research funded Expeditionary Craft (E-Craft) Sealifter (MV) SUSITNA, at Ketchikan Shipyard, Alaska, on Aug. 24, 2006. The design of the E-Craft incorporates lift technology that will allow the ferry to change from Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) mode to barge mode by lowering or raising its center deck. Also in the photo are Randy Johnson, left, President, Alaska Ship and Drydock, and U.S. Navy Rear Adm. William E. Landay, CHIEF of Naval Research. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams) (Released)

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Lake County, Fla., February 3, 2007 -- Tornadoes cut a swath through central Florida last night. FEMA has begun its initial response to the disaster. Mark Wolfe/FEMA

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Lake County, FL, February 7, 2007 -- The central Florida tornadoes cut a swath through the pine trees in Lake County. Tornadoes are an extremely power and devastating force. Mark Wolfe/FEMA

[Severe Winter Storms and Flooding] Springfield, MO, 2-09-07 --- Trucks bringing debris collected in Springfield line up at the monitoring tower where loads are checked and drivers given tickets showing the amount of branches in truck beds. The debris, including trees, was generated by effects of the severe ice storm that cut a swath across Missouri Jan. 12-14, 2007. FEMA Photo/Michael Raphael

[Severe Winter Storms and Flooding] Springfield, MO, 2/92007 --- Trucks loaded with debris picked up in Springfield were checked at the monitoring tower, with drivers given tickets showing percentages of loads. Then drivers dumped their loads at the site and went back to the city to pick up more debris caused by the severe ice storm that cut a swath through Missouri Jan. 12-14, 2007. FEMA Photo/Michael Raphael

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Enterprise, AL, March 3, 2007 -- The recent Alabama tornadoes cut a swath through this wooded area.. The tornadoes caused extensive damage in Alabama. Mark Wolfe/FEMA

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Newtonia, Missouri, May 12, 2008 -- An EF4 tornado cut a swath across southwest Missouri on May 10, badly damaging and destroying dozens of homes in Newtonia. Michael Raphael/FEMA

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Granby, Missouri, May 12, 2008 -- A powerful tornado cut a swath 75 miles long May 10, from Oklahoma to Purdy, Missouri, uprooting trees, tossing cars, flattening houses including this home in Granby. Michael Raphael/FEMA

Studying a Wider Swath

NASA Spacecraft Captures Swath of Destruction from Deadly Oklahoma Tornado

Farmer Garfield: Cutting a swath to the White House

Farmer Garfield: Cutting a swath to the White House