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[Illustrations of experiments proving air is a compressed substance and title page]

Substance of an address delivered by James M. Garnett to the people of Essex, at their late election for a member of Congress, held on the 17th April [1815?].

New York, November 19, 1824. The following is the substance of a trial of Messrs William & P. C. Smith for a conspiracy against Mr. Abraham Paul, as published in the New-York papers during the present week .... New York 1824.

coat of arms from "[The Substance of a Journal during a Residence at the Red River Colony, British North America; and frequent Excursions among the North-West American Indians, in the years 1820-1823.]"

The gridiron "The honorable member solemnly declared in writing that when this country returned to cash payments he would suffer himself to be broiled upon a gridiron, now the country has returned to cash payments and I think the hon. member bound to undergo the consequences." Substance of C of Exchequer's speech upon bank charter / / H.B. ; A. Ducotes lithogy., 70 St. Martin's Lane.

fossil from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

fossils from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

Beryx radians from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

diagram from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

map from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

map from "Sketch of the Geology of North America, being the substance of a memoir read before the Ashmolean Society, etc"

Spirolinites in flints from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

geyser from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

engraving from "[The Wonders of Geology; or, a familiar exposition of geological phenomena: being the substance of a course of lectures ... by G. M. ... from notes taken by G. F. Richardson.]"

edible substance that, according to Abrahamic doctrine, God provided for the Israelites during their travels in the desert from "The Sacred Gift. A series of meditations upon Scripture subjects. Secondseries"

coat of arms from "Sayer's History of Westmoreland, containing the substance of all the remarkable events recorded by Burn and Nicolson, together with a variety of ... information from ancient MSS. ... With illustrations by T. Gilks"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

map from "[A Description of Active and Extinct Volcanos ... Being the substance of some lectures delivered before the University of Oxford, with much additional matter. [With plates, including maps.]]"

I sell the shadow to support the substance, Sojourner Truth.

Sojourner Truth, "I Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance"

map from "Sketches of some Striking Incidents in the History of Barnstaple, being the substance of a lecture, etc"

Shadow and Substance (from Wayside Posies: Original Poems of the Country Life)

Honor the Lord with thy substance and with the first fruits of all thine increase

Never! Since the creation of intellectual substance, has a nation of people exhibited more attrocious barbarity, than have the American people for the last quarter of a century ... Geo Lane. Author of the paper entitled "The Worlds own" &c. New

diagram from "Notes on Crystallography and Crystallo-Physics, being the substance of lectures delivered at Yedo during the years 1876-77. [Edited by Thomas Davies.]"

diagram from "Notes on Crystallography and Crystallo-Physics, being the substance of lectures delivered at Yedo during the years 1876-77. [Edited by Thomas Davies.]"

diagram from "Notes on Crystallography and Crystallo-Physics, being the substance of lectures delivered at Yedo during the years 1876-77. [Edited by Thomas Davies.]"

map from "The Raiyān Moeris. (The substance of an address before the Amer. Geog. Soc., Nov. 11, 1889.) [With 4 maps.]"

map from "The Raiyān Moeris. (The substance of an address before the Amer. Geog. Soc., Nov. 11, 1889.) [With 4 maps.]"

map from "The Raiyān Moeris. (The substance of an address before the Amer. Geog. Soc., Nov. 11, 1889.) [With 4 maps.]"

map from "The Raiyān Moeris. (The substance of an address before the Amer. Geog. Soc., Nov. 11, 1889.) [With 4 maps.]"

map from "The Raiyān Moeris. (The substance of an address before the Amer. Geog. Soc., Nov. 11, 1889.) [With 4 maps.]"

The substance or the shadow? / J.S. Pughe.

Get after the substance, not the shadow / Keppler.

Substance and form. The guy that put the soul in soldier

Seventy-one years, or, My life with photography. Substance and shadow, Cosmopolitan Club, Dec. 6, 1932

Uncle Sam makes own glass. Washington, D.C. Aug. 24. All optical glass used by the United States Navy is manufactured and finished by the Bureau of Standards in Washington. L. Maxwell, of the Glass Section, Bureau of Standards, is shown cutting molten glass into the mold. He uses ordinary tailor's shears in cutting the hot substance which is about as soft as hot molasses candy

Rubber reclamation. Rubber harvest from scrapped tires. Reclaimed, dried scrap rubber is plasticized on the eighty-four-inch mill roll of a xylos process plant in the Midwest. Pigments are added to give the properties desired in the finished product. As it comes off the mill rolls, the reclaimed substance has regained the appearance of new rubber. Firestone

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Kirksite is poured from a melting pot into a pouring ladle in the Inglewood, California, foundry of North American Aviation, Incorporated. This substance is molded into dies for the forming of sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

A view of the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69) during a test of the ship's aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) firefighting system. A soap substance is mixed with the AFFF to assist in cleaning the deck

Aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) sprays from nozzles located in flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69) during a test of the ship's firefighting system. A soap substance is mixed with the AFFF to assist in cleaning the deck

Crew members wash down the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69) during a test of the ship's aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) firefighting system. A soap substance is mixed with the AFFF to assist in cleaning the deck

A view of the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69) during a test of the ship's aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) firefighting system. Flight deck crewmen are standing by to scrub the deck in the background. A soap substance is mixed with the AFFF to assist in cleaning the deck

S47-229-029 - STS-047 - PS Mohri and ``caged`` crystalline substance at Rack 10 in SLJ

S47-229-030 - STS-047 - PS Mohri and ``caged`` crystalline substance at Rack 10 in SLJ

S47-229-028 - STS-047 - PS Mohri and ``caged`` crystalline substance at Rack 10 in SLJ

S47-229-034 - STS-047 - PS Mohri and ``caged`` crystalline substance at Rack 10 in SLJ

S47-229-032 - STS-047 - PS Mohri and ``caged`` crystalline substance at Rack 10 in SLJ

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a worker looks over the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft before it undergoes lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (its white cap is seen on the left) to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc44

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers raise the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft from its workstand to move it to another area for lighting tests on the solar panels. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc47

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility deploy a solar panel on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft before performing lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc38

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the fully extended solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a>spacecraft undergo lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc42

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers adjust the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a>spacecraft before performing lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc43

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers at left check instruments during a lighting test on the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a>spacecraft. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (its white cap is seen on the near end of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc46

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers look over the solar panels on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft that are deployed for lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc49

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a worker (left) conducts lighting tests on the fully extended solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a>spacecraft. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc41

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility check solar panels on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft before performing lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (its white cap is seen on the left) to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc37

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility watch as the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft is lowered before deploying panels for lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (seen on top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc39

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers get ready to rotate the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft before deploying the solar panels (at left and right) for lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc48

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility watch as the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft is rotated and lowered before deploying the solar panels for lighting tests. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (seen on top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc40

Bright white light (left) and blue light (upper right) appear on the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm"> Stardust</a> spacecraft during lighting tests in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999, for a rendezvous with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Stardust will use a substance called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc45

At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker helps guide the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket as it is lowered for mating with the first stage. The rocket is targeted for launch on Feb. 6, carrying the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust </a> spacecraft into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc60

At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket arrives for mating with the first stage. The rocket is targeted for launch on Feb. 6, carrying the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust </a> spacecraft into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc56

The second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket arrives at the top of the tower at Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station for mating with the first stage. The rocket is targeted for launch on Feb. 6, carrying the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust </a>spacecraft into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc58

Workers at Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, ensure the successful mating of the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket with the first stage below it. The rocket is targeted for launch on Feb. 6, carrying the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust </a> spacecraft into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc61

Workers at the top of the tower at Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, watch as the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket moves toward the opening through which it will be mated with the first stage. The rocket is targeted for launch on Feb. 6, carrying the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust </a> spacecraft into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc59

The second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket begins its move up the tower at Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for mating with the first stage. The rocket is targeted for launch on Feb. 6, carrying the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust </a> spacecraft into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc57

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Casey McClellan (right), with Lockheed Martin, and an unidentified worker look over the spacecraft Stardust before a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0095

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the spacecraft Stardust is on display for a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0094

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, media representatives, dressed in protective suits, are updated by Project Manager Richard Grammier (center, top), with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, about the Stardust spacecraft (in the background). Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0096

The cover is removed from the Stardust spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility prior to a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0093

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Casey McClellan (left) and Denise Kato (right), with Lockheed Martin, prepare the spacecraft Stardust for a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0097

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker holds the video camera to be mounted on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. His co-worker (right) makes equipment adjustments. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0117

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the mating of the spacecraft Stardust (above) with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket (below). Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0102

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker (left) runs a wire through a mounting hole on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket in order to affix an external video camera held by the worker at right. The Delta II will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0116

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers check the mounting on a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0119

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the overhead crane lifting the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust is being moved in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0100

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers finish mounting a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0118

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the spacecraft Stardust being lowered in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0101

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the final adjustments on the protective canister enclosing the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust will be moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0123

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers guide a protective canister as it is lowered over the Stardust spacecraft. Once it is enclosed, Stardust will be moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0122

Completely enclosed in a protective canister, the spacecraft Stardust is moved by a crane toward a transporter in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. Stardust is being moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0124

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility keep watch as an overhead crane lowers the Stardust spacecraft, enclosed in a protective canister, onto a transporter. Stardust is being moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0125

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Stardust spacecraft waits to be encased in a protective canister for its move to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0120

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a canister (left) is moved toward the Stardust spacecraft (right). The protective canister will enclose Stardust before the spacecraft is moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0121

Workers watch as the protective canister surrounding the Stardust spacecraft is removed at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. Preparations continue for liftoff of the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0135

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers watch as the protective canister is lifted from the Stardust spacecraft. Preparations continue for liftoff of the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0133

Workers inside the launch tower at Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, watch as the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket is lowered for mating with the second stage below it. The Stardust spacecraft, above it out of sight, is connected to the rocket's third stage. Stardust, targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6, is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0130

The protective canister is removed from around the Stardust spacecraft at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. Preparations continue for liftoff of the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0134

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Stardust spacecraft is revealed after removal of a protective canister. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0136

Inside the launch tower at Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers guide the Stardust spacecraft toward an opening to a Boeing Delta II rocket below. The spacecraft is already connected to the third stage of the rocket that will be mated with the second stage in preparation for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0128

In the early morning, the Stardust spacecraft, with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket attached, arrives atop a transporter at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The second and third stages of the rocket will be mated and prepared for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0126

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Stardust spacecraft, attached to the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket, is lifted up the launch tower. The second and third stages of the rocket will be mated next as preparations continue for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0127

Workers inside the launch tower at Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, guide the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket, and the Stardust spacecraft connected to it, through an opening to the second stage of the rocket below. The second and third stages of teh rocket will be mated next as preparations continue for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pd0129

Workers at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, connect the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket (above), which is already attached to the Stardust spacecraft, with the second stage (below). Stardust, targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6, is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0131