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Capt. A.M. Randol, 1st U.S. Artillery. Col. 2d, N.Y. Cav.

Capt. A.M. Randol, 1st U.S. Artillery. Col. 2d, N.Y. Cav.

Capt. A.M. Randol, 1st U.S. Artillery. Col. 2d, N.Y. Cav.

Capt. A.M. Randol, 1st U.S. Artillery. Col. 2d, N.Y. Cav.

Capt. A.M. Randol, 1st U.S. Artillery. Col. 2d, N.Y. Cav.

Capt. A.M. Randol, 1st U.S. Artillery. Col. 2d, N.Y. Cav.

Topographical Map of the Battle Field of Nashville, Tenn., 15th & 16th Dec. 1864. Prepared under the direction of Col. Wm. E. Merrill, 1st U.S.V.V. Engineers, Chief Engineer, Dept. of the Cumberland, By Major James R. Willett, 1st U.S.V.V. Engineers, Chief Inspector R. R. Defences, Dept. of the Cumberland. Surveyed by Chs. Peseux & John H. Willett, 1864-[186]5. Drawn by Chs. Peseux.

Topographical Map of the Battle Field of Nashville, Tenn., 15th & 16th Dec. 1864. Prepared under the direction of Col. Wm. E. Merrill, 1st U.S.V.V. Engineers, Chief Engineer, Dept. of the Cumberland, By Major James R. Willett, 1st U.S.V.V. Engineers, Chief Inspector R. R. Defences, Dept. of the Cumberland. Surveyed by Chs. Peseux & John H. Willett, 1864-[186]5. Drawn by Chs. Peseux.

Col. Hiram, 1st U.S. Sharpshooters

Col. Hiram, 1st  U.S. Sharpshooters

Company Street, Battery D, 1st U.S. Arty., Camp Seymour, Beaufort, S. C.

Company Street, Battery D, 1st U.S. Arty., Camp Seymour, Beaufort, S. C.

[Private William Liming of Co. B, 21st U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps Infantry Regiment, and unidentified soldier in same uniform]

[Private William Liming of Co. B, 21st U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps Infantry Regiment, and unidentified soldier in same uniform]

Brandy Station, Virginia. Detachment of 1st U.S. Cavalry

Brandy Station, Virginia. Detachment of 1st U.S. Cavalry

Battlefield in front of Franklin, Tennessee, where the United States Forces commanded by Major General J. M. Schofield severely repulsed the Rebel Army under General J. B. Hood, November 30th, 1864. Compiled under the Direction of Col. W. E. Merrill, Chief Engr., D. Cd., by Edward Ruger, Supt., Topl. Engr. Office, Milty. Divn. Tenn....Surveys made by Major James R. Willett, 1st U.S.V.V. Engrs., and Major I. J. S. Remington, 74st Illinois V. V. Infy.

Battlefield in front of Franklin, Tennessee, where the United States Forces commanded by Major General J. M. Schofield severely repulsed the Rebel Army under General J. B. Hood, November 30th, 1864. Compiled under the Direction of Col. W. E. Merrill, Chief Engr., D. Cd., by Edward Ruger, Supt., Topl. Engr. Office, Milty. Divn. Tenn....Surveys made by Major James R. Willett, 1st U.S.V.V. Engrs., and Major I. J. S. Remington, 74st Illinois V. V. Infy.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, 1942-1943; souvenir annual.

Deputy Under Secretary of the Army, John W. Shanon, joins SSGT Millie Chabrier, 758st U.S. Army Garrison, for a chat at the mess hall during his visit. Looking on are CPT E. Vargas (left) and SSGT Perez (right)

Deputy Under Secretary of the Army, John W. Shanon, joins SSGT Millie Chabrier, 758st U.S. Army Garrison, for a chat at the mess hall during his visit. Looking on are CPT E. Vargas (left) and SSGT Perez (right)

Team 4 starts up the hill in Buedingen to their first challenge. There are over 200 steps to climb which they learned by coming back down and counting while carrying a steel weight. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Team 4 starts up the hill in Buedingen to their first challenge. There are over 200 steps to climb which they learned by coming back down and counting while carrying a steel weight. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Team 4 walks past the Buedingen Schloss on their way to the next challenge. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Team 4 walks past the Buedingen Schloss on their way to the next challenge. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Spur holder, SGT. Lindsay overseas spur, David candidate as he selects weapon parts by feeling for the ones he will need to assemble a 50 Caliber machine gun. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Spur holder, SGT. Lindsay overseas spur, David candidate as he selects weapon parts by feeling for the ones he will need to assemble a 50 Caliber machine gun. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SPC. Bosold carries a fuel and water can down a steep slope. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SPC. Bosold carries a fuel and water can down a steep slope. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Command SGT. MAJ. David Davenport and LT. COL. John A. Peeler check haircuts of Spur candidates. Command SGT. MAJ. Davenport gives the thumb up to CAPT. Irin which means to go to the haircut queue. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Command SGT. MAJ. David Davenport and LT. COL. John A. Peeler check haircuts of Spur candidates. Command SGT. MAJ. Davenport gives the thumb up to CAPT. Irin which means to go to the haircut queue. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

CAPT. Felix, and SPC. Bosold choose to have haircuts after LT. COL. John A. Peeler and Command SGT. MAJ. David S. Davenport Sr. hold a haircut inspection. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

CAPT. Felix, and SPC. Bosold choose to have haircuts after LT. COL. John A. Peeler and Command SGT. MAJ. David S. Davenport Sr. hold a haircut inspection. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. O'Donnell Displays personnel gear to earn his spurs. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. O'Donnell Displays personnel gear to earn his spurs. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. Plew, SPC. Bosold, PVT. Kemper, and SGT. Hickey perform a dance before beginning their last task They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. Plew, SPC. Bosold, PVT. Kemper, and SGT. Hickey perform a dance before beginning their last task They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. 1ST Class Cortes and another Spur candidate assemble a 50 Caliber machine gun. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. 1ST Class Cortes and another Spur candidate assemble a 50 Caliber machine gun. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

CAPT. Mercado, 1ST LT. Smith, 2nd LT. Nolan, and STAFF SGT. Victor evacuate this simulated injury carrying the Command SGT. MAJ. log to the Landing Zone. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

CAPT. Mercado, 1ST LT. Smith, 2nd LT. Nolan, and STAFF SGT. Victor evacuate this simulated injury carrying the Command SGT. MAJ. log to the Landing Zone. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. 1ST Class Manstran, SGT. O'Donnell, SGT. Hickey, 2nd LT. Grow, SPC. Bosold, PFC. Kemper, SGT. Plew, SGT. Pace, and others go through drills to earn their spurs. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. 1ST Class Manstran, SGT. O'Donnell, SGT. Hickey, 2nd LT. Grow, SPC. Bosold, PFC. Kemper, SGT. Plew, SGT. Pace, and others go through drills to earn their spurs. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Spur Holder SGT. 1ST Class Renken gives spur candidate SPC. Haselbauer, and CAPT. Wang their spur candidate names on the parade field as they attempt to earn their spurs. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Spur Holder SGT. 1ST Class Renken gives spur candidate SPC. Haselbauer, and CAPT. Wang their spur candidate names on the parade field as they attempt to earn their spurs. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

CAPT. Felix relaxes in the gym at Armstrong Kaserne after completing 9 tasks and walking over 30 miles in the past 33 hours. He is from the 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

CAPT. Felix relaxes in the gym at Armstrong Kaserne after completing 9 tasks and walking over 30 miles in the past 33 hours. He is from the 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

LT. COL. Peeler, Squadron Commander, addresses the Leadership as Command SGT. MAJ. Davenport addresses the Spur Candidates on the parade field in Buedingen, Germany. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

LT. COL. Peeler, Squadron Commander, addresses the Leadership as Command SGT. MAJ. Davenport addresses the Spur Candidates on the parade field in Buedingen, Germany. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

2nd LT. Grow carrying water can and fuel can makes his way up a steep incline in this task. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. The task was one of the most physically demanding of 9 tasks. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

2nd LT. Grow carrying water can and fuel can makes his way up a steep incline in this task. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. The task was one of the most physically demanding of 9 tasks.  (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

2nd LT. Belanger in the prone firing position at the gym on Armstrong kaserne with the Blackhawk crest behind him participates in the 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment's Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

2nd LT. Belanger in the prone firing position at the gym on Armstrong kaserne with the Blackhawk crest behind him participates in the 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment's Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. 1ST Class Cortes receives his Spur candidate name, luck of the draw, from a spur holder in his attempt to earn spurs. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

SGT. 1ST Class Cortes receives his Spur candidate name, luck of the draw, from a spur holder in his attempt to earn spurs. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Honor guard at the entrance to Buedingen Kaserne presents arms and welcome people to CAV country, lead by Command SGT. MAJ. David Davenport to earn their spurs. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

Honor guard at the entrance to Buedingen Kaserne presents arms and welcome people to CAV country, lead by Command SGT. MAJ. David Davenport to earn their spurs. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, begins on Launch Pad 39A, revealing Space Shuttle Atlantis, bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8 and started at 10:56 p.m. EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1391

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, begins on Launch Pad 39A, revealing Space Shuttle Atlantis, bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8 and started at 10:56 p.m. EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure.  Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1391

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1393

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure.  Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1393

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1392

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure.  Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1392

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Connecting the RSS to the cockpit of the shuttle is the orbiter access arm with the White Room extended. The White Room provides access into the orbiter for the astronauts. Above the external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1394

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Connecting the RSS to the cockpit of the shuttle is the orbiter access arm with the White Room extended. The White Room provides access into the orbiter for the astronauts. Above the external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1394

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform as technicians in the control booth roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, away from the orbiter. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform as technicians in the control booth roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, away from the orbiter. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure.  Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Connecting the RSS to the cockpit of the shuttle is the orbiter access arm with the White Room extended. The White Room provides access into the orbiter for the astronauts. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1396

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Connecting the RSS to the cockpit of the shuttle is the orbiter access arm with the White Room extended. The White Room provides access into the orbiter for the astronauts. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1396

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A by Theaphlias B. Terrell, operations manager of Bionetics Photoservice, following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1401

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A by Theaphlias B. Terrell, operations manager of Bionetics Photoservice, following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1401

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1402

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1402

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. In the foreground, photographers position themselves on the crawlerway, in hopes of capturing a unique prelaunch image. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1404

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. In the foreground, photographers position themselves on the crawlerway, in hopes of capturing a unique prelaunch image. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1404

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. In the foreground is the crawlerway. a 130-foot-wide roadway with a 5-percent grade leading to the top of the launch pad. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1403

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. In the foreground is the crawlerway. a 130-foot-wide roadway with a 5-percent grade leading to the top of the launch pad. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1403

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The lightning mast on Launch Pad 39A stands ready to protect Space Shuttle Atlantis from potential thunderstorms following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The lightning mast on Launch Pad 39A stands ready to protect Space Shuttle Atlantis from potential thunderstorms following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1399

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1399

Aerial view of troops in the 1st U.S. Va. Div. Numbering 15,000, who gathered on Hillside at Div. HQS, Korea to enjoy the USO show starring comedian Danny Kaye, and singer Monica Lewis, MGM Motion Picture Actress

Aerial view of troops in the 1st U.S. Va. Div. Numbering 15,000, who gathered on Hillside at Div. HQS, Korea to enjoy the USO show starring comedian Danny Kaye, and singer Monica Lewis, MGM Motion Picture Actress

Aerial view of troops in the 1st U.S. Va. Div. Numbering 15,000, who gathered on Hillside at Div. HQS, Korea to enjoy the USO show starring comedian Danny Kaye, and singer Monica Lewis, MGM Motion Picture Actress

Aerial view of troops in the 1st U.S. Va. Div. Numbering 15,000, who gathered on Hillside at Div. HQS, Korea to enjoy the USO show starring comedian Danny Kaye, and singer Monica Lewis, MGM Motion Picture Actress

[Unidentified soldier in artillery uniform and Shako hat with Battery K, 1st U.S. Artillery flag and battle honors in front of painted backdrop showing garden leading to river] / S. Anderson, 61 Camp St., New Orleans.

[Unidentified soldier in artillery uniform and Shako hat with Battery K, 1st U.S. Artillery flag and battle honors in front of painted backdrop showing garden leading to river] / S. Anderson, 61 Camp St., New Orleans.

[Unidentified soldier in artillery uniform and Shako hat with Battery K, 1st U.S. Artillery flag and battle honors in front of painted backdrop showing garden leading to river] / S. Anderson, 61 Camp St., New Orleans.

[Unidentified soldier in artillery uniform and Shako hat with Battery K, 1st U.S. Artillery flag and battle honors in front of painted backdrop showing garden leading to river] / S. Anderson, 61 Camp St., New Orleans.

1st U.S. colored infantry

1st U.S. colored infantry

1st U.S. colored infantry

1st U.S. colored infantry

[Brandy Station, Va. Officers and men of Co. K, 1st U.S. Cavalry (1st Division, Cavalry Corps)]

[Brandy Station, Va. Officers and men of Co. K, 1st U.S. Cavalry (1st Division, Cavalry Corps)]

[Brandy Station, Va. Officers and men of Co. K, 1st U.S. Cavalry (1st Division, Cavalry Corps)]

[Brandy Station, Va. Officers and men of Co. K, 1st U.S. Cavalry (1st Division, Cavalry Corps)]

Washington, District of Columbia. Hancock's Veteran Corps on F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry

Washington, District of Columbia. Hancock's Veteran Corps on F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry

Washington, District of Columbia. Hancock's Veteran Corps on F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry

Washington, District of Columbia. Hancock's Veteran Corps on F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry