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Recto: On Timber, the Species of Trees (Vitruvius, Book 2, Chapter 9, no. 4); Verso: On Timber, the Battle of Larignium (Vitruvius, Book 2, Chapter 9, no. 15)..

Pÿgargus, Weiss Zars; Tragelaphus, Pÿgargi Species; Hippelaphus Foemina.

Salvia Hispanica, foliis ovatis, petiolis utrinque mucronatis; species imbricatis, calycibus trisidis = Chia Americana. [Chia Sage]

Military laboratory, at No. 34, Dock street near the Drawbridge, Philadelphia: where owners and commanders of armed vessels may be supplied, for either the use of small arms or cannon, at the shortest notice, with every species of military store

The Skeleton of a large species of quadruped hitherto unknown lately discovered one hundred feet under ground near the River La Plata / drawn up by G. Cuvier.

Lepas Anatifera or Barnacle Shell at the base of which are seen some other species of the same genus.

Vorticella polypina magnified & also in its natural size. It is a marine speceies & allied to Vorticella racemosa; Convallarian Vorticella a very common fresh water species, highly magnified.

Holothuria Utriculus. An elegant species of a Sea green colour varied with purple & with very long deep blue tentacula.

flora from "Observationes in varias trifoliorum species"

Botanical Study with a Species of the Nettle Family (genus Urtica)

[Different species of bats, with details of heads, wing and teeth structure] / Fournier, sc. ; N. Remond, imp.

Slavery abolished by the laws of nature!!! Negroes not of the same species with white men!!! The mulatto race will soon cease to exist!! [Regarding course of lectures in aid of the abolition of slavery in the United States to be given by Robert

engraving from "On the Domesticated Animals of the British Islands: comprehending the natural and economical history of species and varieties; the description of the properties of external form, and observations on the principles and practice of breeding"

lamb from "On the Domesticated Animals of the British Islands: comprehending the natural and economical history of species and varieties; the description of the properties of external form, and observations on the principles and practice of breeding"

Shorthorn cattle from "On the Domesticated Animals of the British Islands: comprehending the natural and economical history of species and varieties; the description of the properties of external form, and observations on the principles and practice of breeding"

Scottish Deerhound from "On the Domesticated Animals of the British Islands: comprehending the natural and economical history of species and varieties; the description of the properties of external form, and observations on the principles and practice of breeding"

[Title page of On the origin of species]

diagram from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

hominid from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts"

map from "The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts"

map from "The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

map from "[The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man, with remarks on theories of the origin of species by variation. Illustrated by woodcuts.]"

To conchologists, etc. I desire to obtain suites of the species named in my list for special study. If you can supply any of these and find anything in my list of duplicates which is of value to you, I will gladly make an exchange ... B. Shimek.

Sudan. Khartoum. Khartoum Zoo. A species of Antelope (Addax Nasomaculatus)

Gloucester, Massachusetts. Heavy nets slide down Old Glory's side at fishing grounds off the New England coast where rosefish are being sought. This species of fish can be caught only in the daytime

Gloucester, Massachusetts. Muscles strain as husky fishermen of Portuguese descent pull nets on board the "Old Glory". Their haul is rosefish, a species now used in large quantities by the armed forces

Gloucester, Massachusetts - Heavy nets slide down Old Glory's side at fishing grounds off the New England coast where rosefish are being sought. This species of fish can be caught only in daytime

Production. Veneer for aircraft and other war essentials. Veneer panels for our combat planes will be made from this half-round log of walnut being withdrawn from the steaming vat of a Midwest factory. Great care must be taken in this vatting operation to raise various species of wood to the temperatures at which they can be cut smoothly. Louisville, Kentucky

Gloucester, Massachusetts. Heavy nets slide down Old Glory's side at fishing grounds off the New England coast where rosefish are being sought. This species of fish can be caught only in the daytime

Production. Veneer for aircraft and other war essentials. Veneers for our combat planes are made from these specially selected logs, stored in the yard of a large Midwest factory. The logs on the right are African mahogany from the British Gold Coast. Those on the left are American poplar. Millions of feet of both species are converted monthly into various thicknesses of aircraft veneers. Louisville, Kentucky

Victory food from American waters. Muscles strain as husky fisherman of Portuguese descent pull nets on board the Old Glory. Their haul is rosefish, a species now used in large quantities by the armed forces

Victory food from American waters. Heavy nets slide down Old Glory's side at fishing grounds off the New England coast where rosefish are being sought. This species of fish can be caught only in daytime

Photograph of Assistant Ranger Bob Greenlaw Point Out Bad Species

Photograph of Cow Moose on Halfway Ranger District

Photograph of Cow Moose on Halfway Ranger District

Photograph of Cow Moose on Halfway Ranger District

Photograph of a Red Fox and a Fisher

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Great Horned Owl

Photograph of Great Horned Owl

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Great Horned Owl

Photograph of Red Fox Pup Hiding Behind a Rock

Photograph of Red Fox Pup Hiding Behind a Rock

Photograph of Red Tailed Hawk

Photograph of Great Horned Owl

Photograph of Butterfly on Thistle

Photograph of Canadian Geese Flying Over Chippewa National Forest

Photograph of Canadian Geese Flying Over Chippewa National Forest

Photograph of Fisher in Tree Looking for Porcupine

Photograph of Distant View of a Fisher in Tree

Photograph of Putting an Eartag on an Eight-Pound Male Fisher

Photograph of Fisher in Tree Looking for Porcupine

Photograph of Deer Fawn and Ferns

Photograph of Raccoon in Tree

Photograph of Kildeer Chicks in Nest

Photograph of Kildeer Sitting on Nest

Photograph of Kildeer on Nest

Photograph of Kildeer and Broken Wing Act

Photograph of Kildeer Near Nest

Photograph of Fish Spawning Station for Coho Salmon

Photograph of On-Site Lecture on Streambank Erosion

Photograph of Salmon Spawning Bed

Photograph of Sleeping Fawn

Photograph of Raccoon in Tree

Photograph of Horned Owl

Photograph of Bobcat

Photograph of Raccoon in Tree

Photograph of Buffalo

Photograph of Immature Bald Eagle

Photograph of Skunk Sniffing the Air

Photograph of Bobcat

Photograph of Horned Owl

Photograph of Immature Bald Eagle

This (Sandpiper like) bird, as well as many other species keep watch over Moffett Field wetlands. The shorebird in this picture is a greater yellowlegs (Tinga melanoleuca) which is a common bird found in our coastal salt marsh and tidal zones in winter months. Generally, they summer/breed up north in Canada and Alaska and then migrate in the fall to winter along the west coast of the U.S. and Mexico. Known for their loud call of a slightly descending series of three or more tew notes. Diet consists of small fish, insects, snails, worms, and tadpoles. used in Ames 60 yr. History NASA SP-2000-4314 ARC-1991-AC91-0121-1

Burrowing Owls keep watch over Moffett Field wetlands. The burrowing owl is currently listed as a Species of Special Concern in California. Data collected since 1992 at Moffett Field suggest that the population at Moffett Field is the largest sub-population of owls in the region. Thus, the Moffett Field population is an important site for the long-term survival of burrowing owls in the Bay Area (Trulio 1999). used in Ames 60 yr. History NASA SP-2000-4314 ARC-1993-AC93-0121-1

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A female Red-bellied Woodpecker clings to a utility pole where it has made a home on Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge. The most common type of woodpecker in the South, the "Zebraback" nests in the cavities of trees and consumes large quantities of wood-boring beetles, as well as other insect pests. More than 280 species of birds make their homes on the 140,000-acre refuge, which lies within the boundaries of Kennedy Space Center.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, are shown in their holding tanks in the Operations and Checkout Building. The fish will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc411

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Ingo Ronny Wortmann (left) and Dr. Dirk Voeste, scientists with Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany, examine swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, in their holding tanks in the Operations and Checkout Building. The fish will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized freshwater habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc413

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, are shown in their holding tank in the Operations and Checkout Building. The fish will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D. KSC-98pc408

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, are shown in their holding tank in the Operations and Checkout Building. The fish will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc412

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dr. Dirk Voeste, a scientist with Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany, examines some swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, in their holding tank in the Operations and Checkout Building. The fish will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc410

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A water snail (Biomphalaria glabrata), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, is held up for inspection in the Operations and Checkout Building. The snails will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc409

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Startled by the almost silent appearance of the orbiter Discovery as it lands following the STS-91 mission, several birds hurriedly leave KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) for a more secluded spot. The SLF is nestled among the wilds of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, home to over 300 species of birds. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:18 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, landing on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:22 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. During the mission, the orbiter docked with the Russian space station Mir for the ninth time, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. STS-91 also featured first flights for both the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and the Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew included Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space KSC-98pc739

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A young, male bobcat balances gingerly on telephone pole cables next to the south-bound lane of Kennedy Parkway. The cat is nocturnal and is seldom observed during the day unless scared from its daytime shelter in the grass or beneath a shrub. Usually found in broken sections of heavily wooded or brushy country, bobcats are reported as common in scrub strand and roadside or weedy grass habitats at KSC. The bobcat is known to inhabit mangrove habitats and will readily swim across small bodies of water. The bobcat occurs across southern Canada then south over the entire United States, except for the midwestern corn belt, to southern Mexico. It is the last large mammalian predator remaining on KSC. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is located on Kennedy Space Center property, is home to many species of wild animals, including the bobcat. KSC-98pc1602

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A drop of water clings to the chin of a horned grebe after surfacing from underwater in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The species inhabits marshes and lakes in summer, but winters along the Atlantic Coast to Texas. This is the most common saltwater grebe in the East KSC-99pc20