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Rocket start spaceport, science technology.

Rocket start spaceport, science technology.

Rocket soyuz rocket soyuz, science technology.

Rocket soyuz rocket soyuz, science technology.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The S-1C booster for the Apollo 11 Saturn V was erected atop its mobile launcher in the Spaceport's VAB today. KSC-69P-168

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  - The S-1C booster for the Apollo 11 Saturn V was erected atop its mobile launcher in the Spaceport's VAB today. KSC-69P-168

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Apollo command and service modules scheduled for manned landing missions on the moon cross paths in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the spaceport. The meeting occurred last night when the CSM for Apollo 11 was being hoisted out of a test chamber and the CSM for Apollo 12, which recently arrived at Kennedy Space Center, was getting its initial checkouts in the aisle. Apollo 11 is scheduled for the first manned lunar landing mission this summer. Photo credit: NASA KSC-69P-0204

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Apollo command and service modules scheduled for manned landing missions on the moon cross paths in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the spaceport. The meeting occurred last night when the CSM for Apollo 11 was being hoisted out of a test chamber and the CSM for Apollo 12, which recently arrived at Kennedy Space Center, was getting its initial checkouts in the aisle. Apollo 11 is scheduled for the first manned lunar landing mission this summer.    Photo credit: NASA KSC-69P-0204

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – KSC Director Lee Scherer, left, escorts a Soviet interpreter and Vladimir Shatalov, Soviet Cosmonaut Training Chief, on a tour of Pad 39B at the Spaceport. The Soviet and American personnel connected with July's Apollo Soyuz Test Project were at KSC February 8-10 to inspect equipment and tour facilities. The first international crewed spaceflight was a joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. rendezvous and docking mission. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, or ASTP, took its name from the spacecraft employed: the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz. The three-man Apollo crew lifted off from Kennedy Space Center aboard a Saturn IB rocket on July 15, 1975, to link up with the Soyuz that had launched a few hours earlier. A cylindrical docking module served as an airlock between the two spacecraft for transfer of the crew members. Photo credit: NASA KSC-108-75P-0072

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – KSC Director Lee Scherer, left, escorts a Soviet interpreter and Vladimir Shatalov, Soviet Cosmonaut Training Chief, on a tour of Pad 39B at the Spaceport.  The Soviet and American personnel connected with July's Apollo Soyuz Test Project were at KSC February 8-10 to inspect equipment and tour facilities.      The first international crewed spaceflight was a joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. rendezvous and docking mission.  The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, or ASTP, took its name from the spacecraft employed: the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz.  The three-man Apollo crew lifted off from Kennedy Space Center aboard a Saturn IB rocket on July 15, 1975, to link up with the Soyuz that had launched a few hours earlier.  A cylindrical docking module served as an airlock between the two spacecraft for transfer of the crew members.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-108-75P-0072

A dummy space shuttle orbiter was assembled and rolled out to the launch site as part of an exercise to verify that shuttle elements are compatible with the spaceport's assembly and launch facilities, and ground support equipment

A dummy space shuttle orbiter was assembled and rolled out to the launch site as part of an exercise to verify that shuttle elements are compatible with the spaceport's assembly and launch facilities, and ground support equipment

SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER ENTERPRISE MATED TO AN EXTERNAL FUEL TANK AND TWO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ON TOP OF A MOBIL LAUNCHER PLATFORM, UNDERGOES FIT AND FUNCTION CHECKS AT THE LAUNCH SITE FOR THE FIRST SPACE SHUTTLE AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 39'S PAD A. THE DUMMY SPACE SHUTTLE WAS ASSEMBLED IN THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AND ROLLED OUT TO THE LAUNCH SITE ON MAY 1 AS PART OF AN EXERCISE TO MAKE CERTAIN SHUTTLE ELEMENTS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SPACEPORT'S ASSEMBLY AND LAUNCH FACILITIES AND GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND HELP CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-17

SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER ENTERPRISE MATED TO AN EXTERNAL FUEL TANK AND TWO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ON TOP OF A MOBIL LAUNCHER PLATFORM, UNDERGOES FIT AND FUNCTION CHECKS AT THE LAUNCH SITE FOR THE FIRST SPACE SHUTTLE AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 39'S PAD A.  THE DUMMY SPACE SHUTTLE WAS ASSEMBLED IN THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AND ROLLED OUT TO THE LAUNCH SITE ON MAY 1 AS PART OF AN EXERCISE TO MAKE CERTAIN SHUTTLE ELEMENTS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SPACEPORT'S ASSEMBLY AND LAUNCH FACILITIES AND GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND HELP CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-17

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise mated to an external fuel tank and two solid rocket boosters on top of a Mobil Launcher Platform, undergoes fit and function checks at the launch site for the first Space Shuttle at Launch Complex 39's Pad A. The dummy Space Shuttle was assembled in the Vehicle Assembly Building and rolled out to the launch site on May 1 as part of an exercise to make certain shuttle elements are compatible with the Spaceport's assembly and launch facilities and ground support equipment, and help clear the way for the launch of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-19

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise mated to an external fuel tank and two solid rocket boosters on top of a Mobil Launcher Platform, undergoes fit and function checks at the launch site for the first Space Shuttle at Launch Complex 39's Pad A.  The dummy Space Shuttle was assembled in the Vehicle Assembly Building and rolled out to the launch site on May 1 as part of an exercise to make certain shuttle elements are compatible with the Spaceport's assembly and launch facilities and ground support equipment, and help clear the way for the launch of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-19

SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER ENTERPRISE MATED TO AN EXTERNAL FUEL TANK AND TWO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ON TOP OF A MOBIL LAUNCHER PLATFORM, UNDERGOES FIT AND FUNCTION CHECKS AT THE LAUNCH SITE FOR THE FIRST SPACE SHUTTLE AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 39'S PAD A. THE DUMMY SPACE SHUTTLE WAS ASSEMBLED IN THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AND ROLLED OUT TO THE LAUNCH SITE ON MAY 1 AS PART OF AN EXERCISE TO MAKE CERTAIN SHUTTLE ELEMENTS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SPACEPORT'S ASSEMBLY AND LAUNCH FACILITIES AND GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND HELP CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-14

SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER ENTERPRISE MATED TO AN EXTERNAL FUEL TANK AND TWO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ON TOP OF A MOBIL LAUNCHER PLATFORM, UNDERGOES FIT AND FUNCTION CHECKS AT THE LAUNCH SITE FOR THE FIRST SPACE SHUTTLE AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 39'S PAD A.  THE DUMMY SPACE SHUTTLE WAS ASSEMBLED IN THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AND ROLLED OUT TO THE LAUNCH SITE ON MAY 1 AS PART OF AN EXERCISE TO MAKE CERTAIN SHUTTLE ELEMENTS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SPACEPORT'S ASSEMBLY AND LAUNCH FACILITIES AND GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND HELP CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-14

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations. The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and function checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport. Enterprise will be tansported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, California. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-13

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations.  The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and function checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport.  Enterprise will be tansported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, California. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-13

The Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations. The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and fuction checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport. Enterprise will be transported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, CA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-12

The Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations. The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and fuction checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport. Enterprise will be transported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, CA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-12

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida announces important new federal legislation designed to support the nation's continued space industry development. The announcement was made at Launch Complex 46 at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, the dual-use Navy facility recently modified for commercial launches by the State of Florida. In the background, from left to right, are Hugh Brown, Chairman, Spaceport Florida Authority; Charles Johnson, Athena Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Astronautics; and Col. Ron Larivee, Vice Commander, 45th Space Wing KSC-97PC1763

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida announces important new federal legislation designed to support the nation's continued space industry development. The announcement was made at Launch Complex 46 at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, the dual-use Navy facility recently modified for commercial launches by the State of Florida. In the background, from left to right, are Hugh Brown, Chairman, Spaceport Florida Authority; Charles Johnson, Athena Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Astronautics; and Col. Ron Larivee, Vice Commander, 45th Space Wing KSC-97PC1763

The NASA Lunar Prospector is successfully launched into space by a Lockheed Martin Athena II commercial launch vehicle. Liftoff occurred at 9:28 P.M. EST from Spaceport Florida Authority launch complex 46, the first commercial launch from this site

The NASA Lunar Prospector is successfully launched into space by a Lockheed Martin Athena II commercial launch vehicle. Liftoff occurred at 9:28 P.M. EST from Spaceport Florida Authority launch complex 46, the first commercial launch from this site

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the Moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:38 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the Moon's surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  NASA's Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the Moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:38 p.m. EST.  It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority.  Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the Moon's surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles.  It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission.

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc110

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc110

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc109

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc109

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc106

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc106

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc108

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc108

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc105

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6 at 9:28 p.m. EST. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin's Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission KSC-98pc105

Celebrating the official opening of the new International Space Station (ISS) Center at Kennedy Space Center are, left to right, James Ball, chief, NASA Public Services, KSC; KSC Director Roy D. Bridges Jr.; Hugh Harris, director, NASA Public Affairs, KSC; and Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer, Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport Inc. Center Director Bridges cuts the ribbon to the new tour attraction where full-scale mockups of station modules, through which visitors can walk, are on display. These include the Habitation Unit, where station crew members will live, sleep, and work; a Laboratory Module; and the Pressurized Logistics Module, where racks and supplies will be transported back and forth from KSC to space. Guests also can take an elevated walkway to a gallery overlooking the work are where actual ISS hardware is prepared for flight into space. This new tour site, in addition to a new Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry, are part of a comprehensive effort by NASA and Delaware North to expand and improve the KSC public tour and visitor facilities KSC-98pc156

Celebrating the official opening of the new International Space Station (ISS) Center at Kennedy Space Center are, left to right, James Ball, chief, NASA Public Services, KSC; KSC Director Roy D. Bridges Jr.; Hugh Harris, director, NASA Public Affairs, KSC; and Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer, Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport Inc. Center Director Bridges cuts the ribbon to the new tour attraction where full-scale mockups of station modules, through which visitors can walk, are on display. These include the Habitation Unit, where station crew members will live, sleep, and work; a Laboratory Module; and the Pressurized Logistics Module, where racks and supplies will be transported back and forth from KSC to space. Guests also can take an elevated walkway to a gallery overlooking the work are where actual ISS hardware is prepared for flight into space. This new tour site, in addition to a new Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry, are part of a comprehensive effort by NASA and Delaware North to expand and improve the KSC public tour and visitor facilities KSC-98pc156

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. KSC-98PC-1041

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. KSC-98PC-1041

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River. KSC-98pc-1042

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River. KSC-98pc-1042

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education. KSC-98PC-1057

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education. KSC-98PC-1057

This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education KSC-98pc1059

This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education KSC-98pc1059

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left, can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup, the Post Show Dome, the Astronaut Memorial, and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right of the site is a display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Parking lots span the width of the complex on the south side. KSC-98PC-1058

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left, can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup, the Post Show Dome, the Astronaut Memorial, and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right of the site is a display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Parking lots span the width of the complex on the south side. KSC-98PC-1058

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-98dc1879

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-98dc1879

Federal, state, NASA, KSC and Space Florida Authority (SFA) officials dig in at the planned site of a multi-purpose hangar, phase one of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex to be built near the Shuttle Landing Facility. From left, they are a representative from Rush Construction; Ed O'Connor, executive director of the Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA); Stephen T. Black, Lockheed Martin technical operations program manager; Warren Wiley, deputy director of engineering development; Tom Best, district director, representing U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon; Roy Bridges, director, Kennedy Space Center; Bill Posey, 32nd district representative; Randy Ball, state representative; Charlie Bronson, state senator; Donald McMonagle, manager of launch integration; and John London, Marshall Space Flight Center X-34 program manager. The new complex is jointly funded by SFA, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and Kennedy Space Center. It is intended to support the Space Shuttle and other RLV and X-vehicle systems. Completion is expected by the year 2000 KSC-98pc1882

Federal, state, NASA, KSC and Space Florida Authority (SFA) officials dig in at the planned site of a multi-purpose hangar, phase one of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex to be built near the Shuttle Landing Facility. From left, they are a representative from Rush Construction; Ed O'Connor, executive director of the Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA); Stephen T. Black, Lockheed Martin technical operations program manager; Warren Wiley, deputy director of engineering development; Tom Best, district director, representing U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon; Roy Bridges, director, Kennedy Space Center; Bill Posey, 32nd district representative; Randy Ball, state representative; Charlie Bronson, state senator; Donald McMonagle, manager of launch integration; and John London, Marshall Space Flight Center X-34 program manager. The new complex is jointly funded by SFA, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and Kennedy Space Center. It is intended to support the Space Shuttle and other RLV and X-vehicle systems. Completion is expected by the year 2000 KSC-98pc1882

Donald McMonagle (left), manager, Launch Integration, speaks to federal and state elected officials during the ground breaking ceremony for a multi-purpose hangar, phase one of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex to be built near the Shuttle Landing Facility. At right are Center Director Roy Bridges and Executive Director of the Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) Ed O'Connor. The new complex is jointly funded by SFA, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and Kennedy Space Center. It is intended to support the Space Shuttle and other RLV land X-vehicle systems. Completion is expected by the year 2000 KSC-98pc1881

Donald McMonagle (left), manager, Launch Integration, speaks to federal and state elected officials during the ground breaking ceremony for a multi-purpose hangar, phase one of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex to be built near the Shuttle Landing Facility. At right are Center Director Roy Bridges and Executive Director of the Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) Ed O'Connor. The new complex is jointly funded by SFA, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and Kennedy Space Center. It is intended to support the Space Shuttle and other RLV land X-vehicle systems. Completion is expected by the year 2000 KSC-98pc1881

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-98dc1878

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-98dc1878

Center Director Roy Bridges, at the podium, speaks to federal and state elected officials during the ground breaking ceremony for a multi-purpose hangar, phase one of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex to be built near the Shuttle Landing Facility. At right is Ed O'Connor, executive director of the Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA). The new complex is jointly funded by SFA, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and Kennedy Space Center. It is intended to support the Space Shuttle and other RLV land X-vehicle systems. Completion is expected by the year 2000 KSC-98pc1880

Center Director Roy Bridges, at the podium, speaks to federal and state elected officials during the ground breaking ceremony for a multi-purpose hangar, phase one of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex to be built near the Shuttle Landing Facility. At right is Ed O'Connor, executive director of the Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA). The new complex is jointly funded by SFA, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and Kennedy Space Center. It is intended to support the Space Shuttle and other RLV land X-vehicle systems. Completion is expected by the year 2000 KSC-98pc1880

Looking southwest, this view shows ongoing construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. Edging the construction is Sharkey Road, which parallels the landing strip of the Shuttle Landing Facility nearby. The RLV complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99PP-1047

Looking southwest, this view shows ongoing construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. Edging the construction is Sharkey Road, which parallels the landing strip of the Shuttle Landing Facility nearby. The RLV complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99PP-1047

This aerial view shows the construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Shuttle Landing Facility, with (left) a C-5 air cargo plane, the offloaded canister in front of it containing the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and (right) the mate/demate tower that is used when an orbiter is transported to and from KSC atop a modified Boeing 747. The RLV complex will also include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99pp-1046

This aerial view shows the construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Shuttle Landing Facility, with (left) a C-5 air cargo plane, the offloaded canister in front of it containing the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and (right) the mate/demate tower that is used when an orbiter is transported to and from KSC atop a modified Boeing 747. The RLV complex will also include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99pp-1046

An aerial view shows the early construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background, toward the west, is Banana Creek, flowing into the Indian River Lagoon, and below it the Shuttle Landing Facility's landing strip. The RLV complex will also include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1045

An aerial view shows the early construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background, toward the west, is Banana Creek, flowing into the Indian River Lagoon, and below it the Shuttle Landing Facility's landing strip. The RLV complex will also include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1045

At the construction site of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex at KSC, workers take measurements for one of the buildings. Located near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1063

At the construction site of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex at KSC, workers take measurements for one of the buildings. Located near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1063

Construction is under way for the X-33/X-34 hangar complex near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1060

Construction is under way for the X-33/X-34 hangar complex near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1060

A worker takes a measurement for construction of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex at KSC. Located near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1061

A worker takes a measurement for construction of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex at KSC. Located near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1061

At the construction site of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex at KSC, a worker takes a measurement. Located near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1062

At the construction site of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) complex at KSC, a worker takes a measurement. Located near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the complex will include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1062

Construction continues on an $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At left is a multi-purpose hangar and at right a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility (upper right). Near the top of the photo is the tow-way. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1209

Construction continues on an $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At left is a multi-purpose hangar and at right a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility (upper right). Near the top of the photo is the tow-way. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1209

An aerial closeup view reveals the ongoing construction of an $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and at left a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Near the top of the photo can be seen the tow-way. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1210

An aerial closeup view reveals the ongoing construction of an $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and at left a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Near the top of the photo can be seen the tow-way. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1210

An aerial view reveals (foreground) the ongoing construction of an $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At left is a multi-purpose hangar and at right a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The road at right is the tow-way. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99PP-1212

An aerial view reveals (foreground) the ongoing construction of an $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At left is a multi-purpose hangar and at right a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The road at right is the tow-way. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99PP-1212

The first roof panels are placed on the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The RLV complex, which includes the hangar and a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support, will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1257

The first roof panels are placed on the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The RLV complex, which includes the hangar and a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support, will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1257

A steam roller packs down the ground next to construction of a support building, part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The RLV complex, which includes a multi-purpose hangar and the building to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support, will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1263

A steam roller packs down the ground next to construction of a support building, part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The RLV complex, which includes a multi-purpose hangar and the building to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support, will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1263

Construction workers are silhouetted against the sky as they work on the girders of a support building, part of the new $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The building is to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex also includes a multi-purpose hangar. The complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The facility, jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC, will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1265

Construction workers are silhouetted against the sky as they work on the girders of a support building, part of the new $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The building is to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex also includes a multi-purpose hangar. The complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The facility, jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC, will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1265

Workers place the first roof panels on the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The RLV complex, which includes the hangar and a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support, will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1262

Workers place the first roof panels on the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The RLV complex, which includes the hangar and a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support, will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1262

Work continues on the construction of the roof for the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background can be seen the new construction for the building that will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1260

Work continues on the construction of the roof for the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background can be seen the new construction for the building that will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1260

Girders overhead cast shadows on the walls and floor of a support building under construction, part of the new $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The building is to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex also includes a multi-purpose hangar. The complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The facility, jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC, will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1266

Girders overhead cast shadows on the walls and floor of a support building under construction, part of the new $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The building is to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex also includes a multi-purpose hangar. The complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The facility, jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC, will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1266

Work continues on construction of the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background can be seen the new construction for the building that will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1259

Work continues on construction of the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background can be seen the new construction for the building that will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1259

The support building at the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center takes form. It will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex includes a multi-purpose hangar that will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1261

The support building at the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center takes form. It will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex includes a multi-purpose hangar that will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1261

A worker smoothes the recently poured foundation of the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background can be seen the new construction for the building that will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1258

A worker smoothes the recently poured foundation of the multi-purpose hangar at the site of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background can be seen the new construction for the building that will house related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1258

Construction continues on the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. Shown is the interior of the building to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex also includes a multi-purpose hangar. The complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The facility, jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC, will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1264

Construction continues on the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. Shown is the interior of the building to be used for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The RLV complex also includes a multi-purpose hangar. The complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The facility, jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC, will be operational in early 2000 KSC-99pp1264

Research scientist Greg Goins monitors radish growth under a sulfur-microwave light at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardshi KSC-00pp0696

Research scientist Greg Goins monitors radish growth under a sulfur-microwave light at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardshi KSC-00pp0696

Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0697

Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0697

Research scientist Greg Goins monitors radish growth under a sulfur-microwave light at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardshi KSC00pp0696

Research scientist Greg Goins monitors radish growth under a sulfur-microwave light at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardshi KSC00pp0696

Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0697

Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0697

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0698

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0698

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0698

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0698

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0689

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0689

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0689

Research technician Lisa Ruffa works with a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0689

Research scientist Oscar Monje records data associated with ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0690

Research scientist Oscar Monje records data associated with ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0690

Research scientist Vadim Rygalov describes a new low-pressure water-recycling experiment being designed to help simulate plant growth conditions on Mars. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0692

Research scientist Vadim Rygalov describes a new low-pressure water-recycling experiment being designed to help simulate plant growth conditions on Mars. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0692

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0693

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0693

Research scientist Vadim Rygalov describes a new low-pressure water-recycling experiment being designed to help simulate plant growth conditions on Mars. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0692

Research scientist Vadim Rygalov describes a new low-pressure water-recycling experiment being designed to help simulate plant growth conditions on Mars. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0692

Research scientist Oscar Monje records data associated with ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0690

Research scientist Oscar Monje records data associated with ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0690

Visiting scientist Cheryl Frazier monitors a prototype composting machine in Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0695

Visiting scientist Cheryl Frazier monitors a prototype composting machine in Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0695

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0694

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0694

Research scientist Gary Stutte displays a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0691

Research scientist Gary Stutte displays a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0691

Research scientist Gary Stutte displays a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0691

Research scientist Gary Stutte displays a wheat sample that is part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC-00pp0691

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0693

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0693

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0694

Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0694

Visiting scientist Cheryl Frazier monitors a prototype composting machine in Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0695

Visiting scientist Cheryl Frazier monitors a prototype composting machine in Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship KSC00pp0695

This closeup photo shows the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and to the left is a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and KSC KSC00pp0725

This closeup photo shows the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and to the left is a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and KSC KSC00pp0725

This closeup photo shows the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and to the left is a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and KSC KSC-00pp0725

This closeup photo shows the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and to the left is a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and KSC KSC-00pp0725

In the foreground of this aerial photo is the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and to its left is a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility (center). At the upper left is the runway. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and KSC KSC00pp0724

In the foreground of this aerial photo is the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. At right is a multi-purpose hangar and to its left is a building for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. The complex is situated at the Shuttle Landing Facility (center). At the upper left is the runway. The RLV complex will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and KSC KSC00pp0724

Media gather at the KSC Visitor Complex for the kickoff of the Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which will open to the public on Saturday, June 17. At the podium is Mike Quattrone, executive vice president and general manager, Discovery Channel.; Standing to the left of the podium is Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc., and far left, Jim Jennings, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center.; Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil “Gus” Grissom July 21, 1961 on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking to the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, three miles deep. It lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. The space capsule is now restored and preserved, and part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot KSC-00pp0752

Media gather at the KSC Visitor Complex for the kickoff of the Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which will open to the public on Saturday, June 17. At the podium is Mike Quattrone, executive vice president and general manager, Discovery Channel.; Standing to the left of the podium is Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc., and far left, Jim Jennings, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center.; Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil “Gus” Grissom July 21, 1961 on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking to the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, three miles deep. It lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. The space capsule is now restored and preserved, and part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot KSC-00pp0752

The ribbon is cut and the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) declared operational. Those taking part in the ceremony are (from left) Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Pam Gillespie, from Rep. Dave Weldon's office; Roy Bridges, Kennedy Space Center director; Dave King, director of Shuttle Processing; Retha Hart, deputy associate director, Spaceport Technology Management Office; and Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Program. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC-00pp1244

The ribbon is cut and the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) declared operational. Those taking part in the ceremony are (from left) Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Pam Gillespie, from Rep. Dave Weldon's office; Roy Bridges, Kennedy Space Center director; Dave King, director of Shuttle Processing; Retha Hart, deputy associate director, Spaceport Technology Management Office; and Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Program. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC-00pp1244

The ribbon is cut and the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) declared operational. Those taking part in the ceremony are (from left) Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Pam Gillespie, from Rep. Dave Weldon's office; Roy Bridges, Kennedy Space Center director; Dave King, director of Shuttle Processing; Retha Hart, deputy associate director, Spaceport Technology Management Office; and Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Program. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC00pp1244

The ribbon is cut and the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) declared operational. Those taking part in the ceremony are (from left) Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Pam Gillespie, from Rep. Dave Weldon's office; Roy Bridges, Kennedy Space Center director; Dave King, director of Shuttle Processing; Retha Hart, deputy associate director, Spaceport Technology Management Office; and Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Program. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC00pp1244

Jan Zysko (left) and Rich Mizell (right) test a Personal Cabin Pressure Altitude Monitor in an altitude chamber at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Zysko invented the pager-sized monitor that alerts wearers of a potentially dangerous or deteriorating cabin pressure altitude condition, which can lead to life-threatening hypoxia. Zysko is chief of the KSC Spaceport Engineering and Technology directorate's data and electronic systems branch. Mizell is a Shuttle processing engineer. The monitor, which has drawn the interest of such organizations as the Federal Aviation Administration for use in commercial airliners and private aircraft, was originally designed to offer Space Shuttle and Space Station crew members added independent notification about any depressurization KSC00padig049

Jan Zysko (left) and Rich Mizell (right) test a Personal Cabin Pressure Altitude Monitor in an altitude chamber at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Zysko invented the pager-sized monitor that alerts wearers of a potentially dangerous or deteriorating cabin pressure altitude condition, which can lead to life-threatening hypoxia. Zysko is chief of the KSC Spaceport Engineering and Technology directorate's data and electronic systems branch. Mizell is a Shuttle processing engineer. The monitor, which has drawn the interest of such organizations as the Federal Aviation Administration for use in commercial airliners and private aircraft, was originally designed to offer Space Shuttle and Space Station crew members added independent notification about any depressurization KSC00padig049

Jan Zysko (left) and Rich Mizell (right) test a Personal Cabin Pressure Altitude Monitor in an altitude chamber at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Zysko invented the pager-sized monitor that alerts wearers of a potentially dangerous or deteriorating cabin pressure altitude condition, which can lead to life-threatening hypoxia. Zysko is chief of the KSC Spaceport Engineering and Technology directorate's data and electronic systems branch. Mizell is a Shuttle processing engineer. The monitor, which has drawn the interest of such organizations as the Federal Aviation Administration for use in commercial airliners and private aircraft, was originally designed to offer Space Shuttle and Space Station crew members added independent notification about any depressurization KSC-00padig049

Jan Zysko (left) and Rich Mizell (right) test a Personal Cabin Pressure Altitude Monitor in an altitude chamber at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Zysko invented the pager-sized monitor that alerts wearers of a potentially dangerous or deteriorating cabin pressure altitude condition, which can lead to life-threatening hypoxia. Zysko is chief of the KSC Spaceport Engineering and Technology directorate's data and electronic systems branch. Mizell is a Shuttle processing engineer. The monitor, which has drawn the interest of such organizations as the Federal Aviation Administration for use in commercial airliners and private aircraft, was originally designed to offer Space Shuttle and Space Station crew members added independent notification about any depressurization KSC-00padig049

This close-up shows the pager-sized Personal Cabin Pressure Altitude Monitor developed by Jan Zysko, chief of the KSC Spaceport Engineering and Technology directorate's data and electronic systems branch. The monitor alerts wearers of a potentially dangerous or deteriorating cabin pressure altitude condition, which can lead to life-threatening hypoxia. Zysko originally designed the monitor to offer Space Shuttle and Space Station crew members added independent notification about any depressurization. However, it has drawn the interest of such organizations as the Federal Aviation Administration for use in commercial airliners and private aircraft as well KSC-00padig050

This close-up shows the pager-sized Personal Cabin Pressure Altitude Monitor developed by Jan Zysko, chief of the KSC Spaceport Engineering and Technology directorate's data and electronic systems branch. The monitor alerts wearers of a potentially dangerous or deteriorating cabin pressure altitude condition, which can lead to life-threatening hypoxia. Zysko originally designed the monitor to offer Space Shuttle and Space Station crew members added independent notification about any depressurization. However, it has drawn the interest of such organizations as the Federal Aviation Administration for use in commercial airliners and private aircraft as well KSC-00padig050

Ed Gormel (left), executive director of Spaceport Florida Authority, and Roy Bridges Jr., Center Director, get ready to sign a SERPL Real Property Use Permit Agreement between the two organizations to construct a three-mile roadway. It is the start of a construction project that includes the Space Experiment Research & Processing Laboratory (SERPL). The signing took place outdoors on S.R. 3 prior to a groundbreaking ceremony for the roadway. The road, to be known as Space Commerce Way, will serve the public by providing a 24-hour access route through KSC from S.R. 3 to the NASA Causeway and KSC Visitor Complex. The SERPL project is enabled by a partnership and collaboration between NASA and the State of Florida to create a vital resource for international and commercial space customers. SERPL is considered a magnet facility, and will support the development and processing of life sciences experiments destined for the International Space Station and accommodate NASA, industry and academic researchers performing associated biological research KSC01padig059

Ed Gormel (left), executive director of Spaceport Florida Authority, and Roy Bridges Jr., Center Director, get ready to sign a SERPL Real Property Use Permit Agreement between the two organizations to construct a three-mile roadway. It is the start of a construction project that includes the Space Experiment Research & Processing Laboratory (SERPL). The signing took place outdoors on S.R. 3 prior to a groundbreaking ceremony for the roadway. The road, to be known as Space Commerce Way, will serve the public by providing a 24-hour access route through KSC from S.R. 3 to the NASA Causeway and KSC Visitor Complex. The SERPL project is enabled by a partnership and collaboration between NASA and the State of Florida to create a vital resource for international and commercial space customers. SERPL is considered a magnet facility, and will support the development and processing of life sciences experiments destined for the International Space Station and accommodate NASA, industry and academic researchers performing associated biological research KSC01padig059

During a signing ceremony, Ed Gormel (left), executive director of Spaceport Florida Authority, and Roy Bridges Jr., Center Director, respond to a remark from the audience. The two are signing a SERPL Real Property Use Permit Agreement between the two organizations to construct a three-mile roadway. It is the start of a construction project that includes the Space Experiment Research & Processing Laboratory (SERPL). The signing took place outdoors on S.R. 3 prior to a groundbreaking ceremony for the roadway. The road, to be known as Space Commerce Way, will serve the public by providing a 24-hour access route through KSC from S.R. 3 to the NASA Causeway and KSC Visitor Complex. The SERPL project is enabled by a partnership and collaboration between NASA and the State of Florida to create a vital resource for international and commercial space customers. SERPL is considered a magnet facility, and will support the development and processing of life sciences experiments destined for the International Space Station and accommodate NASA, industry and academic researchers performing associated biological research KSC01padig060

During a signing ceremony, Ed Gormel (left), executive director of Spaceport Florida Authority, and Roy Bridges Jr., Center Director, respond to a remark from the audience. The two are signing a SERPL Real Property Use Permit Agreement between the two organizations to construct a three-mile roadway. It is the start of a construction project that includes the Space Experiment Research & Processing Laboratory (SERPL). The signing took place outdoors on S.R. 3 prior to a groundbreaking ceremony for the roadway. The road, to be known as Space Commerce Way, will serve the public by providing a 24-hour access route through KSC from S.R. 3 to the NASA Causeway and KSC Visitor Complex. The SERPL project is enabled by a partnership and collaboration between NASA and the State of Florida to create a vital resource for international and commercial space customers. SERPL is considered a magnet facility, and will support the development and processing of life sciences experiments destined for the International Space Station and accommodate NASA, industry and academic researchers performing associated biological research KSC01padig060

At a groundbreaking ceremony, participants and guests get ready to dig in, signifying the start of construction on a new roadway through KSC. It is the start of a construction project that includes the Space Experiment Research & Processing Laboratory (SERPL). From left are Dr. Pamella J. Dana, from the executive office of Florida’s governor, Jeb Bush; Deputy Associate Administrator Michael Hawes, Space Station, NASA; Sen. George Kirkpatrick; Spaceport Florida Authority Executive Director Ed Gormel; Executive Director Dr. Samuel T. Durrance, Florida Space Research Institute; Florida’s Lt. Gov. Frank Brogan; Congressman Dave Weldon; Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; SFA SERPL Program Manager Debra Holliday; KSC SERPL Program Manager Jan Heuser; District Manager Cheryl Harrison-Lee, Florida Department of Transportation; State Senator Jim Sebesta; and KSC Director JoAnn H. Morgan, External Relations and Business Development. The project is enabled by a partnership and collaboration between NASA and the State of Florida to create a vital resource for international and commercial space customers. SERPL is considered a magnet facility, and will support the development and processing of life sciences experiments destined for the International Space Station and accommodate NASA, industry and academic researchers performing associated biological research KSC01padig064

At a groundbreaking ceremony, participants and guests get ready to dig in, signifying the start of construction on a new roadway through KSC. It is the start of a construction project that includes the Space Experiment Research & Processing Laboratory (SERPL). From left are Dr. Pamella J. Dana, from the executive office of Florida’s governor, Jeb Bush; Deputy Associate Administrator Michael Hawes, Space Station, NASA; Sen. George Kirkpatrick; Spaceport Florida Authority Executive Director Ed Gormel; Executive Director Dr. Samuel T. Durrance, Florida Space Research Institute; Florida’s Lt. Gov. Frank Brogan; Congressman Dave Weldon; Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; SFA SERPL Program Manager Debra Holliday; KSC SERPL Program Manager Jan Heuser; District Manager Cheryl Harrison-Lee, Florida Department of Transportation; State Senator Jim Sebesta; and KSC Director JoAnn H. Morgan, External Relations and Business Development. The project is enabled by a partnership and collaboration between NASA and the State of Florida to create a vital resource for international and commercial space customers. SERPL is considered a magnet facility, and will support the development and processing of life sciences experiments destined for the International Space Station and accommodate NASA, industry and academic researchers performing associated biological research KSC01padig064

Center Director Roy Bridges (center) is congratulated by Spaceport Florida Authority Executive Director Ed Gormel (left) at the 12th annual Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award Dinner held at the KSC Visitor Complex’s Debus Conference Facility. At right is Rick Abramson, president of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc. Bridges was presented with the 2001 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award honoring his progressive, visionary leadership and contributions to space technology and exploration. The Florida Committee of the National Space Club presented the award. The Debus Award was first given in 1980. Created to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to the American aerospace effort, the award is named for the KSC’s first Director, Dr. Kurt H. Debus KSC01pp0760

Center Director Roy Bridges (center) is congratulated by Spaceport Florida Authority Executive Director Ed Gormel (left) at the 12th annual Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award Dinner held at the KSC Visitor Complex’s Debus Conference Facility. At right is Rick Abramson, president of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc. Bridges was presented with the 2001 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award honoring his progressive, visionary leadership and contributions to space technology and exploration. The Florida Committee of the National Space Club presented the award. The Debus Award was first given in 1980. Created to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to the American aerospace effort, the award is named for the KSC’s first Director, Dr. Kurt H. Debus KSC01pp0760

Workers supervise the off-loading of segments of a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.; The rocket will be used to launch the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-M (GOES-M), the latest in the current series of advanced geostationary weather satellites in service.; GOES-M is being prepared for launch at the Astrotech Space Operations facility located in the Spaceport Florida Industrial Park in Titusville, Fla. The launch is scheduled for July 15 from Pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC-01pp1041

Workers supervise the off-loading of segments of a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.; The rocket will be used to launch the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-M (GOES-M), the latest in the current series of advanced geostationary weather satellites in service.; GOES-M is being prepared for launch at the Astrotech Space Operations facility located in the Spaceport Florida Industrial Park in Titusville, Fla. The launch is scheduled for July 15 from Pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC-01pp1041

Workers supervise the off-loading of segments of a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.; The rocket will be used to launch the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-M (GOES-M), the latest in the current series of advanced geostationary weather satellites in service.; GOES-M is being prepared for launch at the Astrotech Space Operations facility located in the Spaceport Florida Industrial Park in Titusville, Fla. The launch is scheduled for July 15 from Pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC-01pp1040

Workers supervise the off-loading of segments of a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.; The rocket will be used to launch the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-M (GOES-M), the latest in the current series of advanced geostationary weather satellites in service.; GOES-M is being prepared for launch at the Astrotech Space Operations facility located in the Spaceport Florida Industrial Park in Titusville, Fla. The launch is scheduled for July 15 from Pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC-01pp1040

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The signing of a lease agreement between Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) and United Space Alliance (USA) for the use of a hangar at Kennedy Space Center brings smiles to the participants. Seated at the table are (left) Marcie Harris, USA Site Director, and (right) Ed Gormel, Spaceport Florida Executive Director. Observing behind them are (left to right) Rochelle Cooper, USA associate general counsel; Marv Jones, KSC associate director; Greg Popp, Spaceport Florida business manager; Congressman Dave Weldon; and State Rep. Mike Haridopolos. The hangar was originally developed by the state as part of a joint NASA/SFA Reusable Launch Vehicle Support Complex at KSC. USA plans to use the state-developed 50,000-square-foot facility to store and maintain Space Shuttle ground equipment KSC-01pp1267

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The signing of a lease agreement between Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) and United Space Alliance (USA) for the use of a hangar at Kennedy Space Center brings smiles to the participants. Seated at the table are (left) Marcie Harris, USA Site Director, and (right) Ed Gormel, Spaceport Florida Executive Director. Observing behind them are (left to right) Rochelle Cooper, USA associate general counsel; Marv Jones, KSC associate director; Greg Popp, Spaceport Florida business manager; Congressman Dave Weldon; and State Rep. Mike Haridopolos. The hangar was originally developed by the state as part of a joint NASA/SFA Reusable Launch Vehicle Support Complex at KSC. USA plans to use the state-developed 50,000-square-foot facility to store and maintain Space Shuttle ground equipment KSC-01pp1267

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After the signing of a lease agreement between Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) and United Space Alliance (USA) for the use of a hangar at Kennedy Space Center, (foreground left) Marcie Harris, USA site director, and (foreground right) Ed Gormel, Spaceport Florida executive director, hold a symbolic ribbon. Behind them are (left to right) Rochelle Cooper, USA associate general counsel; Marv Jones, KSC associate director; Greg Popp, Spaceport Florida business manager; Congressman Dave Weldon; and State Rep. Mike Haridopolos. The hangar was originally developed by the state as part of a joint NASA/SFA Reusable Launch Vehicle Support Complex at KSC. USA plans to use the state-developed 50,000-square-foot facility to store and maintain Space Shuttle ground equipment KSC-01pp1269

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After the signing of a lease agreement between Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) and United Space Alliance (USA) for the use of a hangar at Kennedy Space Center, (foreground left) Marcie Harris, USA site director, and (foreground right) Ed Gormel, Spaceport Florida executive director, hold a symbolic ribbon. Behind them are (left to right) Rochelle Cooper, USA associate general counsel; Marv Jones, KSC associate director; Greg Popp, Spaceport Florida business manager; Congressman Dave Weldon; and State Rep. Mike Haridopolos. The hangar was originally developed by the state as part of a joint NASA/SFA Reusable Launch Vehicle Support Complex at KSC. USA plans to use the state-developed 50,000-square-foot facility to store and maintain Space Shuttle ground equipment KSC-01pp1269

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After the signing of a lease agreement between Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) and United Space Alliance (USA) for the use of a hangar at Kennedy Space Center, (foreground left) Marcie Harris, USA site director, and (foreground right) Ed Gormel, Spaceport Florida executive director, hold a symbolic ribbon. Behind them are (left) Greg Popp, Spaceport Florida business manager, and (right) Congressman Dave Weldon. The hangar was originally developed by the state as part of a joint NASA/SFA Reusable Launch Vehicle Support Complex at KSC. USA plans to use the state-developed 50,000-square-foot facility to store and maintain Space Shuttle ground equipment KSC-01pp1268

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After the signing of a lease agreement between Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) and United Space Alliance (USA) for the use of a hangar at Kennedy Space Center, (foreground left) Marcie Harris, USA site director, and (foreground right) Ed Gormel, Spaceport Florida executive director, hold a symbolic ribbon. Behind them are (left) Greg Popp, Spaceport Florida business manager, and (right) Congressman Dave Weldon. The hangar was originally developed by the state as part of a joint NASA/SFA Reusable Launch Vehicle Support Complex at KSC. USA plans to use the state-developed 50,000-square-foot facility to store and maintain Space Shuttle ground equipment KSC-01pp1268

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- As night approaches, the P5 truss rolls away from the Spaceport Florida hangar where it waited out a rain storm. The truss is being transported to the Space Station Processing Facility. The P5 is scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station on mission 12A.1 in April 2003 KSC-01pp1364

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- As night approaches, the P5 truss rolls away from the Spaceport Florida hangar where it waited out a rain storm. The truss is being transported to the Space Station Processing Facility. The P5 is scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station on mission 12A.1 in April 2003 KSC-01pp1364

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The P5 truss finally arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility after its arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility and a brief detour to the Spaceport Florida hangar to get out of the rain. The P5 is scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station on mission 12A.1 in April 2003. KSC-01pp1365

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The P5 truss finally arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility after its arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility and a brief detour to the Spaceport Florida hangar to get out of the rain. The P5 is scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station on mission 12A.1 in April 2003. KSC-01pp1365

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The P5 truss rolls into the Spaceport Florida hangar just before a rain storm. The truss eventually will be transported to the Space Station Processing Facility. The P5 is scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station on mission 12A.1 in April 2003 KSC-01pp1362

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The P5 truss rolls into the Spaceport Florida hangar just before a rain storm. The truss eventually will be transported to the Space Station Processing Facility. The P5 is scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station on mission 12A.1 in April 2003 KSC-01pp1362

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 3. Coming in for landing. Inside the control building at the Shuttle Landing Facility, air traffic controller Donny Linton, left, and SGS air facility manager Bob Bryen survey the SLF runway. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn006

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 3. Coming in for landing. Inside the control building at the Shuttle Landing Facility, air traffic controller Donny Linton, left, and SGS air facility manager Bob Bryen survey the SLF runway. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000.  The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse  workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an  official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public  Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn006

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 2. Preparing the pad. Workers maintain Pad A at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39. Jack Hanover of SDB Engineers and Constructors Inc. prepares to change a bearing in the Rotating Service Structure. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn004

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 2. Preparing the pad. Workers maintain Pad A at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39. Jack Hanover of SDB Engineers and Constructors Inc. prepares to change a bearing in the Rotating Service Structure. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn004

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life page 2. Preparing the pad. Workers maintain Pad A at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39. Robert Lust of IVEY Construction pauses on his way to install a safety handrail. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn002

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life page 2. Preparing the pad. Workers maintain Pad A at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39. Robert Lust of IVEY Construction pauses on his way to install a safety handrail. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs  Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn002

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 1. Sunrise at Launch Pad A at Kennedy Space Center. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees. KSC00spn001

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 1. Sunrise at Launch Pad A at Kennedy Space Center. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees. KSC00spn001

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 3. Coming in for landing. A “Super Guppy” transport aircraft lands at the Shuttle Landing space Station. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn005

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 3. Coming in for landing. A “Super Guppy” transport aircraft lands at the Shuttle Landing  space Station. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25,  2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers  play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil  service and contractor employees KSC00spn005

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 2. Preparing the pad. Workers maintain Pad A at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39. A team of United Space Alliance workers don gas masks before calibrating the pad’s hypergolic fuel system. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn003

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Day in the Life, page 2. Preparing the pad. Workers maintain Pad A at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39. A team of United Space Alliance workers don gas masks before calibrating the pad’s hypergolic fuel system. This photograph was taken for a special color edition of Spaceport News designed to portray in photographs a single day at KSC, July 26, 2000. The special edition, published Aug. 25, 2000, was created to give readers a look at KSC’s diverse workforce and the critical roles workers play in the nation’s space program. Spaceport News is an official publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by the Public Affairs Office in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees KSC00spn003

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- (From left) Center Director Roy Bridges, Brig. Gen. Donald P. Pettit and Executive Director of the Cape Canaveral Spaceport Management Office Ed Gormel share the ribbon cutting at the formal opening of a Customer Service office at the Spaceport. Gen. Pettit is the commander of the 45th Space Wing KSC-02pd0041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   (From left) Center Director Roy Bridges, Brig. Gen. Donald P. Pettit  and Executive Director of the Cape Canaveral Spaceport Management Office Ed Gormel share the ribbon cutting at the formal opening of a Customer Service office at the Spaceport.  Gen. Pettit is the commander of the 45th Space Wing KSC-02pd0041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (center) cuts the ribbon for the opening of KSC Direct, the new Web-Broadcast Studio at KSC. Joining him are (left to right) Dennis Armstrong, Web Multimedia manager; JoAnn H. Morgan, director of External Relations and Business Development; Bridges; Vanessa Stromer, Information Technology Division, Spaceport Services; and Brian Chase, district director for Congressman Dave Weldon, who was unable to attend the ceremony. Located in the News Center on the Press Mound at KSC, the Web Broadcast Studio provides video clips of launches, landings and other KSC events in a real-time environment, called KSC Direct, through KSC's Web pages KSC-02pd0119

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (center) cuts the ribbon for the opening of KSC Direct, the new Web-Broadcast Studio at KSC.  Joining him are (left to right) Dennis Armstrong, Web Multimedia manager; JoAnn H. Morgan, director of External Relations and Business Development; Bridges; Vanessa Stromer, Information Technology Division, Spaceport Services; and Brian Chase, district director for Congressman Dave Weldon, who was unable to attend the ceremony.   Located in the News Center on the Press Mound at KSC, the Web Broadcast Studio provides video clips of launches, landings and other KSC events in a real-time environment, called KSC Direct, through KSC's Web pages KSC-02pd0119

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During opening ceremonies for the 40th anniversary celebration of American spaceflight, Rick Abramson, president of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc., waves to the spectators. Behind him are four of the space pioneers being honored: (from left) Wally Schirra, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn Jr. and Scott Carpenter. Next to Carpenter stands a commemorative painting of a Mercury rocket launch that the four signed. The ceremonies were held in the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. The event was capped with a dinner held at the KSC Apollo/Saturn V Center KSC-02pd0354

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   During opening ceremonies for the 40th anniversary celebration of American spaceflight, Rick Abramson, president of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc., waves to the spectators.  Behind him are four of the space pioneers being honored: (from left) Wally Schirra, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn Jr. and Scott Carpenter.  Next to Carpenter stands a commemorative painting of a Mercury rocket launch that the four signed.  The ceremonies were held in the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. The event was capped with a dinner held at the KSC Apollo/Saturn V Center KSC-02pd0354