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Skylab sketch

Wernher von Braun inspecting a mockup of the Skylab Orbital Workshop

Space Station

Space Station

Skylab, 1973-1979

SL2-04-118 (June 1973) --- A color photograph of the San Francisco Bay, California area, taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. (The picture should be held with the clouds and Pacific Ocean on the left.) Note the thickly populated and highly developed area around the bay. Among the cities visible are San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and San Jose. This view extends eastward to show a portion of the San Joaquin Valley. This photograph was taken by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment in the Multiple Docking Adapter of the space station. Type SO-356 film was used. The S190-A experiment is part of the Skylab Earth Resources Experiments Package (EREP). Photo credit: NASA SL2-04-118

SL2-16-281 (June 1973) --- A vertical view of the Orlando and central Florida area photographed from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. (The picture should be held with the heaviest cloud cover at the bottom.) The extensive road and highway network in the area is clearly visible. The Lakeland and Winter Haven area is near the center of the picture. Interstate 4 extends southwesterly out of Orlando through the center of the picture. The urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex is clearly evident. The giant recreational facility is just southwest of Orlando. This picture was taken by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment in the Multiple Docking Adapter of the space station. Type SO-356 film was used. Photo credit: NASA SL2-16-281

Skylab

Final testing of the Soviet Salyut-7 space station before launch. "Soviet Military Power," 1983, Page 69

Space Station Mock-up in Neutral Buoyancy Simulator

Artist's concept of a space station in orbit

Model of a Soyuz spacecraft docking with the Salyut-7 space station. The display is in front of one of the pavilions of the Exhibition of Soviet National Economic Achievement

A model of a Salyut-7 space station, with a Soyuz space craft docked at each end. The display is in front of one of the pavilions of the Exhibition of Soviet National Economic Achievement located across from the Kosmos Hotel on the north side of the city

SPACE STATION MODEL MOCKUPS N-239A PROX-OPS (PROXIMITY OPERATIONS SIMULATOR) FABRICATION WITH PHIL CULBERTSON ARC-1985-AC85-0827-228

Space Station

Space Station

Space Station

Space Station

CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. -- This aerial view shows construction progress of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-391C-7421

CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. -- This aerial view shows construction progress of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-392C-0326

CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. -- This aerial view shows construction progress of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-392C-3756-28

CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. -- This aerial view shows construction progress of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-392C-3756-23

Space Station Gravitational Biology Facility Project Mock-up with Kristine Guerra (2.5) with Biolab (simulating weightlessness in space) ARC-1992-AC92-0401-3

Space Station Data Systems Advance Portable Workstation (Computer). WNE ARC-1994-AC94-0024

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Russian-built Docking Module is lowered for installation into the payload bay of the space shuttle Atlantis while it is in bay 2 of the Orbiter Processing Facility. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two spacecraft. The white structures attached to the module's sides are solar panels that will be attached to the Mir after the conclusion of the STS-74 mission. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-95PC-1324

ZEISS COMPOUND MICROSCOPE WITH MONITOR & MELISSA KIRVEN-BROOKS. Space Station Biological Research Project. (SSBRP) ARC-1996-AC96-0394-5

SAC AND INCUBATOR WITH MELISSA KIRVEN-BROOKS. Space Station Biological Research Project ARC-1996-AC96-0394-2

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt, in right foreground, talks to fellow crew members, Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, in left foreground, of the Russian Space Agency, and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. In the background are NASA suit technician Al Rochford, at left, and astronaut Mario Runco Jr., who is assisting the STS-84 crew. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist Michael C. Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc739

The STS-84 crew gets a ride in an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. At right, from front to back, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins and Commander Charles J. Precourt. On left, from front to back, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Edward Tsang Lu. George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, is seated next to Lu. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc742

STS-84 Pilot Eileen Marie Collins practices using a gas mask during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. It will be second space flight for Collins, who was the first woman Shuttle pilot on her initial mission, STS-63 in 1995. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc741

With several of her fellow crew members watching, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, seated at center, gets instructions on using the slidewire baskets, part of the emergency egress system at Launch Pad 39A. Familiarization with pad procedures and systems is part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities for the crew. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian space agency, is one of the seven STS-84 crew members for the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Another member, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. Kondakova previously lived on the Russian space station as the flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc740

STS-84 crew members examine part of the emergency egress system at Launch Pad 39A, during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Dressed in their blue flight suits are Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, standing in foreground; and, in basket from right, Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu and Carlos I. Noriega and Commander Charles J. Precourt. Ken Clark, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA), is standing at lower left. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist Michael C. Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc744

STS-84 crew members listen intently to Commander Charles J. Precourt, at far right, as he talks to news media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale, and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc737

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale participates in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Foale, a veteran of three space flights, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc735

The STS-84 crew pose for a group photograph in front of the crew hatch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. In the front row, from left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Edward Tsang Lu; and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. In the back row, from left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Commander Charles J. Precourt and Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega. They are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc738

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt talks to news media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Two-time space flyer Precourt will lead the other six STS-84 crew members on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. One of the crew members, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc734

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets instruction in Launch Pad 39A’s emergency egress system from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA). The sevenmember crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. NASA astronaut Mario Runco Jr., next to Kondakova in a blue flight suit, is assisting the crew during TCDT. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc743

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, talks to news media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Kondakova will be one of seven crew members on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Another of the crew members, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. Kondakova previously lived on the Russian space station as the flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc736

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt, at right, and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other five members of the STS-84 crew are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc750

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale rides in an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc753

Wearing their orange launch and entry spacesuits, members of the STS-84 crew are all smiles as they pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A with the Space Shuttle Atlantis in the background. Kneeling in front are Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy, at right, of the European Space Agency, and Carlos I. Noriega. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale and Edward Tsang Lu, and Commander Charles J. Precourt. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc751

STS-84 Pilot Eileen Marie Collins participates in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Behind her is Commander Charles J. Precourt. TCDT is a dress rehearsal for the launch, which is scheduled May 15. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission KSC-97pc758

The STS-84 crew pose for a photograph with members of the mission payload team in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dressed in their blue flight suits, from left, are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc752

STS-84 crew members ride in and learn how to operate an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In the front seat is Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits beside her on top of the personnel carrier. Directly behind Hoggard, from left, are Commander Charles J. Precourt and Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova (sitting) of the Russian Space Agency. At the rear, from left, are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale and Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc755

STS-84 crew members practice emergency egress procedures in slidewire baskets at Launch Pad 39A. They are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. In the foreground are Commander Charles J. Precourt, at left, and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. In the middle basket are Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, at left, and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. In the last slidewire basket at rear, from left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Edward Tsang Lu and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc748

Proudly wearing red KSC Fire/Rescue hats, members of the STS-84 crew pause for a moment for a group photograph while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency; and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu and Commander Charles J. Precourt. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc756

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency rides in an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Her nickname on this mission is Betty Sue. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc754

STS-84 Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, at left, and Elena V. Kondakova, of the Russian Space Agency, find a moment to communicate one-on-one, perhaps about upcoming and past experiences living on the Russian Space Station Mir, during a busy training session at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other five crew members are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. Kondakova spent 169 days in space as the cosmonaut flight engineer of the 17th main mission to Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. After Atlantis docks with Mir on STS-84, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff. KSC-97pc759

STS-84 crew members ride in and learn how to operate an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Seated inside the M-113, from left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins (waving) and Commander Charles J. Precourt, in front. George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits on top of the personnel carrier. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc757

STS-84 Mission Specialists, from left, C. Michael Foale, Edward Tsang Lu and Elena V. Kondakova practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other four members of the STS-84 crew are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc749

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1), scheduled to fly on Space Shuttle mission STS-88 is undergoing processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to Node 1, the space station’s structural building block, during ground processing. STS-88 is the first International Space Station assembly flight. KSC-97PC1265

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1), scheduled to fly on Space Shuttle mission STS-88 is undergoing processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to Node 1, the space station’s structural building block, during ground processing. STS-88 is the first International Space Station assembly flight. KSC-97PC1264

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The SPACEHAB Double Module which will be used primarily as a cargo container for Space Shuttle Mission STS-86 makes a temporary stop at the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) en route to Launch Pad 39A. SPACEHAB will be put into the payload canister in the SSPF. The module was prepared for flight at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. About three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies will be exchanged between Atlantis and the Mir during the mission. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the Russian space station, replacing NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1337

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This horizontal tube is known as MEPHISTO, the French acronym for a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. This experiment, designed for the study of solidification (or freezing) during the growth cycle of liquid materials used for semiconductor crystals, aims to aid in the development of techniques for growing higher quality crystals on Earth. All STS-87 experiments are scheduled for launch on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1382

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Seen at right in the circular white cover is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment. The large white vertical cylinder in the center of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) and the horizontal tube to the left of it is MEPHISTO, a French acronym for a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. Just below MEPHISTO is the Space Acceleration Measurement System, or SAMS, which measures the microgravity conditions in which the experiments are conducted. The The metallic breadbox-like structure behind the AADSF is the Confined Helium Experiment (CHeX) that will study one of the basic influences on the behavior and properties of materials by using liquid helium confined between solid surfaces and microgravity. All of these experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1380

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Seen in the foreground at right is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment. The metallic breadbox-like structure behind the IDGE is the Confined Helium Experiment (CHeX) that will study one of the basic influences on the behavior and properties of materials by using liquid helium confined between solid surfaces and microgravity. The large white vertical cylinder at left is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) and the horizontal tube behind it is MEPHISTO, the French acronym for a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. Just below the left end of MEPHISTO is the Space Acceleration Measurement System, or SAMS, which measures the microgravity conditions in which the experiments are conducted. All of these experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1379

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Seen in the foreground at right is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment. The metallic breadbox-like structure behind the IDGE is the Confined Helium Experiment (CHeX) that will study one of the basic influences on the behavior and properties of materials by using liquid helium confined between solid surface, and microgravity. These experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1383

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The large white vertical cylinder in the center of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) and the horizontal tube to the left of it is MEPHISTO, a French acronym for a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. Seen at right behind the AADSF in the circular white cover is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment. Under the multi-layer insulation with the American flag and mission logo is the Space Acceleration Measurement System, or SAMS, which measures the microgravity conditions in which the experiments are conducted. All of these experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1458

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The vertical tube in the center of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF), which will be used by researchers to study the solidification of semiconductor materials in microgravity. Scientists will be able to better understand how microgravity influences the solidification process of these materials and develop better methods for controlling that process during future Space flights and Earth-based production. To its left is MEPHISTO, the French acronym for a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. All STS-87 experiments are scheduled for launch on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1459

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Here, a technician is monitoring the Confined Helium Experiment, or CHeX, that will use microgravity to study one of the basic influences on the behavior and properties of materials by using liquid helium confined between silicon disks. CHeX and several other experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1457

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). A technician is working on the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF), which will be used by researchers to study the solidification of semiconductor materials in microgravity. Scientists will be able to better understand how microgravity influences the solidification process of these materials and develop better methods for controlling that process during future Space flights and Earth-based production. All STS-87 experiments are scheduled for launch on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1462

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The large white vertical cylinder in the middle of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) and the horizontal tube to its left is MEPHISTO, the French acronym for a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. Seen to the right of the AADSF is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment. Under the multi-layer insulation with the American flag and mission logo is the Space Acceleration Measurement System, or SAMS, which measures the microgravity conditions in which the experiments are conducted. All of these experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1461

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Seen in the foreground at right is the USMP-4 logo with the acronyms of its experiments. Above the American flag at left is the MEPHISTO experiment, a cooperative American and French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. Scientists will study changes in solidification rates, temperature, and interface shape of an alloy to understand how these changes affect composition and properties of the metal produced. Under the multi-layer insulation with the American flag and mission logo is the Space Acceleration Measurement System, or SAMS, which measures the microgravity conditions in which the experiments are conducted. All USMP-4 experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1460

Technicians are monitoring experiments on the United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) in preparation for its scheduled launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from Kennedy Space Center (KSC). USMP-4 experiments are prepared in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The large white vertical cylinder at the right of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF ), which is a sophisticated materials science facility used for studying a common method of processing semiconductor crystals called directional solidification. The technician in the middle of the photo is leaning over MEPHISTO, a cooperative American-French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth KSC-97PC1470

Technicians are monitoring experiments on the United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) in preparation for its scheduled launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from Kennedy Space Center (KSC). USMP-4 experiments are prepared in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The large white vertical cylinder in the center of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF), which is a sophisticated materials science facility used for studying a common method of processing semiconductor crystals called directional solidification. The white horizontal tube to the right is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment KSC-97PC1469

United States Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) experiments are prepared to be flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-87 in the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Seen in the foreground at left is the USMP-4 logo with the acronyms of its experiments. Above the American flag at left is the MEPHISTO experiment, a cooperative American and French investigation of the fundamentals of crystal growth. The large white vertical cylinder in the center of the photo is the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF), which is a sophisticated materials science facility used for studying a common method of processing semiconductor crystals called directional solidification. The white horizontal tube to the right is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), which will be used to study the dendritic solidification of molten materials in the microgravity environment. All USMP-4 experiments are scheduled for launch aboard STS-87 on Nov. 19 from KSC KSC-97PC1472

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 (PMA 2), at left, part of the first International Space Station (ISS) element to be launched from the U.S., awaits prelaunch processing in the Space Station Processing Facility after its arrival at KSC. PMAs 1 and 2 attached to a component called Node 1, shown in background at far right, to form the first U.S.-launched ISS element. The Node 1/PMA assembly will provide key connecting points in orbit for other Space Station modules and for docking of the orbiter with the ISS. PMA 1 will provide the interface between U.S. and Russian elements of the Station; PMA 2 will provide a Shuttle orbiter docking area. The Node 1/PMA assembly is targeted for liftoff aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in July 1998. KSC-97pc1531

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 (PMA 2), part of the first International Space Station (ISS) element to be launched from the U.S., awaits prelaunch processing in the Space Station Processing Facility after its arrival at KSC. PMAs 1 and 2 attached to a component called Node 1, a Station structural building block, will make up the first U.S.-launched ISS element. The Node 1/PMA assembly will provide key connecting points in orbit for other Space Station modules and for docking of the orbiter with the ISS. PMA 1 will provide the interface between U.S. and Russian elements of the Station; PMA 2 will provide a Shuttle orbiter docking area. The Node 1/PMA assembly is targeted for liftoff aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in July 1998. KSC-97pc1530

In preparation for Space Shuttle Mission STS-87, the United States Microgravity Payload-4 undergoes final processing in the Space Station Processing Facility before its move to Launch Complex 39B. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite KSC-97PC1571

In preparation for Space Shuttle Mission STS-87, the United States Microgravity Payload-4 undergoes final processing in the Space Station Processing Facility before its move to Launch Complex 39B. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite KSC-97PC1570

In preparation for Space Shuttle Mission STS-87, the United States Microgravity Payload-4 undergoes final processing in the Space Station Processing Facility before its move to Launch Complex 39B. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite KSC-97PC1569

In preparation for Space Shuttle Mission STS-87, the United States Microgravity Payload-4 undergoes final processing in the Space Station Processing Facility before its move to Launch Complex 39B. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite KSC-97PC1568

STS-88 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for that mission in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. Discussing the mission are, from left to right, Pilot Rick Sturckow, Mission Specialists Jerry Ross and Nancy Currie, and Commander Bob Cabana. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-88, the first ISS assembly flight, is targeted for launch in July 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour KSC-97PC1793

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test TCDT activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Posing, from left to right, are Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D. Commander Terrence Wilcutt Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D. Pilot Joe Edwards, Jr. and Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency and James Reilly, Ph.D. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a January 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m. Photo credit: NASA KSC-98PC-0122

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., participates in a question and answer session for the media as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc126

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency gets ready to drive the M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities while George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits atop the vehicle. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc117

The STS-89 crew pose in the white room at the entrance to the Space Shuttle Endeavour at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The crew include, from left to right, Mission Specialist James Reilly, Ph.D.; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Mission Specialists Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., and Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency. In back are, from left to right, Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., and Michael Anderson. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc128

STS-89 Pilot Joe Edwards Jr., prepares to drive an M-113 armored personnel carrier as George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, looks on during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc120

STS-89 Commander Terrence Wilcutt gets ready to train in an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Standing inside the M-113 vehicle is Wilcutt while George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits atop the armored personnel carrier. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc116

STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D. gets ready to drive an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Standing inside the M-113 is Dr. Thomas while George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits atop the vehicle. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc119

STS-89 Mission Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., prepares to drive an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc121

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency drives the M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities while George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, gets a free ride. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc118

The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Posing, from left to right, are Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D.; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency and James Reilly, Ph.D. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc122

Sitting at the entrance to the orbiter is STS-89 Mission Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., as she prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc139

Smiling at the entrance to the orbiter is STS-89 Mission Specialist James Reilly, Ph.D., as he prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc141

Assisted with flight gear by white room closeout crew members is STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc140

STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc138

STS-89 Commander Terrence Wilcutt arrives at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility in one of the T-38 aircraft traditionally flown by the astronaut corps. The eight STS-89 crew members flew into KSC from Johnson Space Center as final preparations are under way toward the scheduled liftoff on Jan. 22 of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc161

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, poses with his wife, Nadezhda Sharipova, and Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., at right, shortly after arrival at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The eight STS-89 crew members flew into KSC from Johnson Space Center as final preparations are under way toward the scheduled liftoff on Jan. 22 of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc164

STS-89 Mission Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., at left, and Commander Terrence Wilcutt discuss their upcoming mission at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The eight STS-89 crew members flew into KSC from Johnson Space Center as final preparations are under way toward the scheduled liftoff on Jan. 22 of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc165

STS-89 Pilot Joe Edwards Jr. arrives at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility in one of the T-38 aircraft traditionally flown by the astronaut corps. The eight STS-89 crew members flew into KSC from Johnson Space Center as final preparations are under way toward the scheduled liftoff on Jan. 22 of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc163

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency arrives at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility in one of the T-38 aircraft traditionally flown by the astronaut corps. The eight STS-89 crew members flew into KSC from Johnson Space Center as final preparations are under way toward the scheduled liftoff on Jan. 22 of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc162

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Commander Terrence Wilcutt poses in front of the crew's family and friends at KSC's Launch Pad 39A the day before the scheduled launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Final preparations are under way toward liftoff on Jan. 22 on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc188

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., Michael Anderson, James Reilly, Ph.D.; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency pose at KSC's Launch Pad 39A the day before the scheduled launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Final preparations are under way toward liftoff on Jan. 22 on the eighth mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc187

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., poses at KSC's Launch Pad 39A wearing a miniature koala bear on the day before the scheduled launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour that will carry him up to the Russian Space Station Mir. Final preparations are under way toward liftoff on Jan. 22 on the eighth mission to dock with Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas, who was born and educated in South Australia, will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST KSC-98pc186

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc228

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc223

The Space Shuttle Endeavour greets a very significant day for the youngest orbiter of the fleet as its Rotational Service Structure is rolled back on its scheduled day of launch. STS-89, slated for a 9:48 p.m. EST liftoff Jan. 22, is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc198

The Space Shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Space Station Mir. Endeavour lifted off successfully at its scheduled time of 9:48:15 p.m. EST on Jan. 22 from Pad 39A. STS-89 is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc224

STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39A before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour for launch. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc230