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Cape canaveral usa space center, science technology.

Cape canaveral usa space center, science technology.

Rocketry at Space Center, Houston, Texas

Rocketry at Space Center, Houston, Texas

Exact shuttle mock-up at Space Center, Houston, Texas

Exact shuttle mock-up at Space Center, Houston, Texas

Astronauts outfits on display at the Space Center in Houston, Texas

Astronauts outfits on display at the Space Center in Houston, Texas

At Jetty Park in Port Canaveral, a crowd of approximately 6,000 gathered to view the 7 a.m. space shuttle launch. Many people spent the night at the Brevard County park, equipped with cameras, lawn chairs, and coolers. Jetty Park, south of the space center, was one of the best viewing sites in the county. KSC-81PC-0418

At Jetty Park in Port Canaveral, a crowd of approximately 6,000 gathered to view the 7 a.m. space shuttle launch. Many people spent the night at the Brevard County park, equipped with cameras, lawn chairs, and coolers. Jetty Park, south of the space center, was one of the best viewing sites in the county. KSC-81PC-0418

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, right, presents a framed photograph of the Kremlin to center director Robert Crippen during a visit to the space center. Space, energy and the environment are the three major focuses of the Russian's U.S. visit, which also included a stop at the agency's Johnson Space Center. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-93PC-1148

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, right, presents a framed photograph of the Kremlin to center director Robert Crippen during a visit to the space center. Space, energy and the environment are the three major focuses of the Russian's U.S. visit, which also included a stop at the agency's Johnson Space Center. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-93PC-1148

STS-81 Mission Specialist J.M. "Jerry" Linenger talks to the press at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after the flight crew arrived at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996. Linenger will be the fourth U.S. astronaut to stay onboard the Russian space station and serve as a Mir crew member. Mission Commander Michael A. Baker is to his left KSC-97pc122

STS-81 Mission Specialist J.M. "Jerry" Linenger talks to the press at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after the flight crew arrived at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996. Linenger will be the fourth U.S. astronaut to stay onboard the Russian space station and serve as a Mir crew member. Mission Commander Michael A. Baker is to his left KSC-97pc122

STS-81 Mission Commander Michael A. Baker talks to the press at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after he and his crew arrived at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission KSC-97pc121

STS-81 Mission Commander Michael A. Baker talks to the press at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after he and his crew arrived at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission KSC-97pc121

The STS-81 flight crew poses on the runway of KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after they arrive at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. They are (from left): Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr.; and Mission Specialists Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff; John M. Grunsfeld, Marsha S. Ivins, and J.M. "Jerry" Linenger. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996 after arrival there during the STS-79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module which will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission KSC-97pc119

The STS-81 flight crew poses on the runway of KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after they arrive at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. They are (from left): Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr.; and Mission Specialists Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff; John M. Grunsfeld, Marsha S. Ivins, and J.M. "Jerry" Linenger. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996 after arrival there during the STS-79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module which will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission KSC-97pc119

The STS-81 flight crew is welcomed to KSC by NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (far right) and Johnson Space Center Director George Abbey (second from right) as they arrive at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. They are (from left): Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr.; and Mission Specialists Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff; John M. Grunsfeld, Marsha S. Ivins, and J.M. "Jerry" Linenger. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996 after arrival there during the STS-79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module which will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission KSC-97pc123

The STS-81 flight crew is welcomed to KSC by NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (far right) and Johnson Space Center Director George Abbey (second from right) as they arrive at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. They are (from left): Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr.; and Mission Specialists Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff; John M. Grunsfeld, Marsha S. Ivins, and J.M. "Jerry" Linenger. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996 after arrival there during the STS-79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module which will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission KSC-97pc123

The STS-81 flight crew conducts a press briefing on the runway of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility after they arrive at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. They are (from left): Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr.; and Mission Specialists Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff; John M. Grunsfeld, Marsha S. Ivins, and J.M. "Jerry" Linenger. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996 after arrival there during the STS79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module which will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission KSC-97pc120

The STS-81 flight crew conducts a press briefing on the runway of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility after they arrive at the space center for the final countdown preparations for the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. They are (from left): Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr.; and Mission Specialists Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff; John M. Grunsfeld, Marsha S. Ivins, and J.M. "Jerry" Linenger. The 10-day mission will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19, 1996 after arrival there during the STS79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module which will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission KSC-97pc120

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC963

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC963

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC961

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC961

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC965

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC965

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC964

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC964

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC960

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC960

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC962

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC962

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC959

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC959

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The crew members are Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC966

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch  Pad 39A at 2:02 p.m. EDT July 1 to begin the 16-day STS-94 Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch window was opened 47 minutes earlier than  the originally scheduled time of 2:37 p.m. to improve the opportunity to lift off before  Florida summer rain showers reached the space center. The  crew members are Mission  Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; Pilot Susan L. Still; Payload Commander Janice Voss;  Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists  Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the space flight, the MSL-1 will be  used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the  International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal  growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic  Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of  Columbia’s payload bay. These payloads had previously flown on the STS-83 mission in  April, which was cut short after nearly four days because of indications of a faulty fuel  cell. STS-94 is a reflight of that mission KSC-97PC966

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1049

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle  Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at  6:46:34 a.m. EDT  with Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L.  Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist  Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander  Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger  K.  Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission  elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity  Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1049

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1051

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle  Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at  6:46:34 a.m. EDT  with Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L.  Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist  Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander  Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger  K.  Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission  elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity  Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1051

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches  down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with  Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to  complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas,  Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload  Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1052

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle  Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at  6:46:34 a.m. EDT  with Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L.  Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist  Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander  Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger  K.  Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission  elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity  Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1052

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building at right and the Mate-Demate Device at left, the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia glides onto Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building at right and the Mate-Demate Device at left, the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia glides onto Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches  down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with  Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to  complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas,  Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload  Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1044

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches  down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with  Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to  complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas,  Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload  Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1044

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1047

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches  down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with  Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to  complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas,  Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload  Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science  Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1047

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1045

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle  Orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at  6:46:34 a.m. EDT  with Mission Commander  James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L.  Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist  Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander  Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger  K.  Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. Mission  elapsed time for STS-94 was 15 days,16 hours, 44 seconds. During the Microgravity  Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the  hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space  Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials  processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of  the STS-83 mission that lifted off   from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a  faulty fuel cell. This was Columbia’s 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the  space center in the history of the Shuttle program KSC-97PC1045

Two T-38 jets with members of the STS-86 crew fly over the space center after takeoff from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The seven crew members were at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. They are returning to Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, for final prelaunch training. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1378

Two T-38 jets with members of the STS-86 crew fly over the space center after takeoff from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The seven crew members were at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. They are returning to Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, for final prelaunch training. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1378

A flock of birds takes flight as the orbiter Columbia, with its drag chute deployed, touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc567

A flock of birds takes flight as the orbiter Columbia, with its drag chute deployed, touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc567

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc554

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc554

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc557

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc557

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc563

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc563

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc558

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc558

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc553

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc553

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98dc560

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98dc560

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia is about to touch down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-pa90-05

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia is about to touch down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-pa90-05

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia is moments from touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-pa90-04

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia is moments from touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-pa90-04

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc564

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc564

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc555

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc555

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98dc559

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98dc559

Flying along the Indian River toward KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility is the orbiter Columbia as it nears touchdown on Runway 33 to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. This unique view with Titusville and the Indian River in the background was taken from the roof of the 525-foot-high Vehicle Assembly Building. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc561

Flying along the Indian River toward KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility is the orbiter Columbia as it nears touchdown on Runway 33 to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. This unique view with Titusville and the Indian River in the background was taken from the roof of the 525-foot-high Vehicle Assembly Building. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc561

STS-90 Mission Specialists Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency (left) and Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., inspect the orbiter Columbia's tires in the evening after their midday arrival on May 3, ending their nearly 16-day Neurolab mission. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system KSC-98pc578

STS-90 Mission Specialists Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency (left) and Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., inspect the orbiter Columbia's tires in the evening after their midday arrival on May 3, ending their nearly 16-day Neurolab mission. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system KSC-98pc578

Some of the STS-90 crew members pose at the Shuttle Landing Facility hours after arrival on May 3, ending their nearly 16-day Neurolab mission. Shown left to right are Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan, D.V.M.; Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D.; and Mission Specialists Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency and Kathryn (Kay) Hire holding a sign that states "Proud to be at KSC." The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system KSC-98pc579

Some of the STS-90 crew members pose at the Shuttle Landing Facility hours after arrival on May 3, ending their nearly 16-day Neurolab mission. Shown left to right are Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan, D.V.M.; Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D.; and Mission Specialists Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency and Kathryn (Kay) Hire holding a sign that states "Proud to be at KSC." The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system KSC-98pc579

With its drag chute deployed, the orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc566

With its drag chute deployed, the orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc566

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia is about to touch down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-pa90-03

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia is about to touch down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-pa90-03

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc556

The orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc556

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Framed by Florida foliage and wetlands, this unique view was taken from the roof of the 525-foot-high Vehicle Assembly Building. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc562

The orbiter Columbia approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Framed by Florida foliage and wetlands, this unique view was taken from the roof of the 525-foot-high Vehicle Assembly Building. Main gear touchdown was at 12:08:59 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1998, landing on orbit 256 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 12:09:58 EDT, completing a total mission time of 15 days, 21 hours, 50 minutes and 58 seconds. The 90th Shuttle mission was Columbia's 13th landing at the space center and the 43rd KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program. During the mission, the crew conducted research to contribute to a better understanding of the human nervous system. The crew of the STS-90 Neurolab mission include Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc562

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc773

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc773

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Charred trees and brush in a wooded section of Kennedy Space Center still burn Monday, June 22, after lightning touched off three different fires Sunday evening in and around Kennedy Space Center at Tel IV, Ransom Road and Pine Island Road. This area is part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The fires were a short distance from operational facilities at the space center and forced the closing of Florida State Route 3. The fires are being contained by firefighters from Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service KSC-98pc766

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Charred trees and brush in a wooded section of Kennedy Space Center still burn Monday, June 22, after lightning touched off three different fires Sunday evening in and around Kennedy Space Center at Tel IV, Ransom Road and Pine Island Road. This area is part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The fires were a short distance from operational facilities at the space center and forced the closing of Florida State Route 3. The fires are being contained by firefighters from Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service KSC-98pc766

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc769

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc769

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc770

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc770

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc772

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc772

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc771

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is located on Kennedy Space Center property. KSC-98pc771

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A wooded section of the southeast corner of Kennedy Space Center burns on Monday, June 22, after lightning touched off three different fires Sunday evening in and around Tel IV, Ransom Road and Pine Island Road. This area is part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The fires were a short distance from operational facilities at the space center and forced the closing of Florida State Route 3. The fires are being contained by firefighters from Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service KSC-98pc768

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  A wooded section of the southeast corner of Kennedy Space Center burns on Monday, June 22, after lightning touched off three different fires Sunday evening in and around Tel IV, Ransom Road and Pine Island Road. This area is part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The fires were a short distance from operational facilities at the space center and forced the closing of Florida State Route 3. The fires are being contained by firefighters from Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service KSC-98pc768

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A fire burns in the background as members of the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service operate firefighting equipment soaking the grass and underbrush in an attempt to keep the fire away from Kennedy Parkway and the wooded area on the other side of the road. Lightning touched off three different fires Sunday evening in and around Kennedy Space Center at Tel IV, Ransom Road and Pine Island Road. This area is part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge operated by the service. The fires were a short distance from operational facilities at the space center and forced the closing of Florida State Route 3. The fires are being contained by firefighters from Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service KSC-98pc767

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  A fire burns in the background as members of the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service operate firefighting equipment soaking the grass and underbrush in an attempt to keep the fire away from Kennedy Parkway and the wooded area on the other side of the road. Lightning touched off three different fires Sunday evening in and around Kennedy Space Center at Tel IV, Ransom Road and Pine Island Road. This area is part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge operated by the service. The fires were a short distance from operational facilities at the space center and forced the closing of Florida State Route 3. The fires are being contained by firefighters from Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service KSC-98pc767

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center, an anhinga gets ready to eat the fish it captured in the nearby Indian River with its long, dagger-shaped bill. The bird will flip its catch into the air and gulp it down headfirst. The anhinga is also known as the "snakebird" because in the water its body is submerged so that only its head and long, slender neck are visible. Ranging the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts from North Carolina to Texas, north in the Mississippi Valley to Arkansas and Tennessee, and in the South to South America, it inhabits freshwater ponds and swamps with thick vegetation. They are often seen with wings half-open, drying them in the sun since they lack oil glands with which to preen KSC-99wl05

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center, an anhinga gets ready to eat the fish it captured in the nearby Indian River with its long, dagger-shaped bill. The bird will flip its catch into the air and gulp it down headfirst. The anhinga is also known as the "snakebird" because in the water its body is submerged so that only its head and long, slender neck are visible. Ranging the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts from North Carolina to Texas, north in the Mississippi Valley to Arkansas and Tennessee, and in the South to South America, it inhabits freshwater ponds and swamps with thick vegetation. They are often seen with wings half-open, drying them in the sun since they lack oil glands with which to preen KSC-99wl05

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Spotted in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center, an anhinga captures a fish in its long, dagger-shaped bill. It is also known as the "snakebird" because in the water its body is submerged so that only its head and long, slender neck are visible. Ranging the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts from North Carolina to Texas, north in the Mississippi Valley to Arkansas and Tennessee, and in the South to South America, it inhabits freshwater ponds and swamps with thick vegetation. They are often seen with wings half-open, drying them in the sun since they lack oil glands with which to preen KSC-99wl06

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Spotted in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center, an anhinga captures a fish in its long, dagger-shaped bill. It is also known as the "snakebird" because in the water its body is submerged so that only its head and long, slender neck are visible. Ranging the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts from North Carolina to Texas, north in the Mississippi Valley to Arkansas and Tennessee, and in the South to South America, it inhabits freshwater ponds and swamps with thick vegetation. They are often seen with wings half-open, drying them in the sun since they lack oil glands with which to preen KSC-99wl06

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A robin perches on a branch in the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a>Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. Robins range throughout North America, from Alaska to Florida. Although considered a harbinger of spring, they do winter in northern states, frequenting cedar bogs and swamps. They also winter in Florida, where they often can be seen in flocks of hundreds near KSC and the wildlife refuge, which comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods to fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc66

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A robin perches on a branch in the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a>Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. Robins range throughout North America, from Alaska to Florida. Although considered a harbinger of spring, they do winter in northern states, frequenting cedar bogs and swamps. They also winter in Florida, where they often can be seen in flocks of hundreds near KSC and the wildlife refuge, which comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods to fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc66

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pintail duck swims calmly in the waters of the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a>Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. The pintail can be found in marshes, prairie ponds and tundra, and salt marshes in winter. They range from Alaska and Greenland south to Central America and the West Indies. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc65

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pintail duck swims calmly in the waters of the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a>Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. The pintail can be found in marshes, prairie ponds and tundra, and salt marshes in winter. They range from Alaska and Greenland south to Central America and the West Indies. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc65

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A sandpiper wades the water in the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a> Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. Sandpipers are usually seen foraging on the beach or margins of lakes, ponds, marshes or streams. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc64

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A sandpiper wades the water in the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a> Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. Sandpipers are usually seen foraging on the beach or margins of lakes, ponds, marshes or streams. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc64

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The KSC Visitor Complex welcomes more than 2.75 million visitors each year. Featured are bus tours of the space center with up-close views of Space Shuttle launch facilities and International Space Station processing. The Visitor Complex has recently undergone a $13 million expansion, with new exhibits, films, and an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge KSC-99pp0409

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The KSC Visitor Complex welcomes more than 2.75 million visitors each year. Featured are bus tours of the space center with up-close views of Space Shuttle launch facilities and International Space Station processing. The Visitor Complex has recently undergone a $13 million expansion, with new exhibits, films, and an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge KSC-99pp0409

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Media and photographers get a close-up view of the Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule after its recovery from the Atlantic Ocean floor where it lay for 38 years. Launched July 21, 1961, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it. It quickly sank to a three-mile depth. Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. Curt Newport, an underwater salvage expert, located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader. The expedition was sponsored by the Discovery Channel. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y. KSC-99pp1033

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Media and photographers get a close-up view of the Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule after its recovery from the Atlantic Ocean floor where it lay for 38 years.   Launched July 21, 1961, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.  A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it.  It quickly sank to a three-mile depth.  Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. Curt Newport, an underwater salvage expert, located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader.  The expedition was sponsored by the Discovery Channel.  The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas,  where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y. KSC-99pp1033

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Retrieved from the ocean floor three miles deep, the Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule is revealed to photographers and the media in Port Canaveral, Fla. The capsule was found and raised by Curt Newport (left), leading an expedition sponsored by the Discovery Channel. After its successful 16-minute suborbital flight on July 21, 1961, the Liberty Bell 7, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it. It quickly sank to a three-mile depth. Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. An underwater salvage expert, Newport located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y KSC-99pp1030

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Retrieved from the ocean floor three miles deep, the Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule is revealed to photographers and the media in Port Canaveral, Fla.  The capsule was found and raised by Curt Newport (left), leading an expedition sponsored by the Discovery Channel.  After its successful 16-minute suborbital flight on July 21, 1961, the Liberty Bell 7, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.  A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it.  It quickly sank to a three-mile depth.  Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. An underwater salvage expert, Newport located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader.  The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas,  where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y KSC-99pp1030

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A close-up of the recently recovered Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule from the ocean floor shows the lettering "United States" still clearly visible on its side. Thirty-eight years ago, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it. It quickly sank to a three-mile depth. Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. In an expedition sponsored by the Discovery Channel, underwater salvage expert Curt Newport fulfilled a 14-year dream in finding and, after one abortive attempt, successfully raising the capsule and bringing it to Port Canaveral. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y. KSC-99pp1036

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A close-up of the recently recovered Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule from the ocean floor shows the lettering "United States" still clearly visible on its side. Thirty-eight years ago, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.  A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it.  It quickly sank to a three-mile depth.  Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. In an expedition sponsored by the Discovery Channel, underwater salvage expert Curt Newport fulfilled a 14-year dream in finding and, after one abortive attempt, successfully raising the capsule and bringing it to Port Canaveral. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas,  where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y. KSC-99pp1036

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This photograph shows two mercury dimes that were found inside the recently recovered Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule. Thirty-eight years ago, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it. It quickly sank to a three-mile depth. Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. In an expedition sponsored by the Discovery Channel, underwater salvage expert Curt Newport fulfilled a 14-year dream in finding and, after one abortive attempt, successfully raising the capsule and bringing it to Port Canaveral. The dimes had apparently been placed in the capsule before its launch July 21, 1961. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y. KSC-99pp1035

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This photograph shows two mercury dimes that were found inside the recently recovered Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule. Thirty-eight years ago, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.  A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it.  It quickly sank to a three-mile depth.  Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. In an expedition sponsored by the Discovery Channel, underwater salvage expert Curt Newport fulfilled a 14-year dream in finding and, after one abortive attempt, successfully raising the capsule and bringing it to Port Canaveral.  The dimes had apparently been placed in the capsule before its launch July 21, 1961. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas,  where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y. KSC-99pp1035

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gunther Wendt takes a turn at the podium after viewing the recovered Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule, seen in the background. At right is Curt Newport who led the expedition to find and retrieve the capsule. The expedition was sponsored by the Discovery Channel. Wendt worked on the Liberty Bell 7 before its launch July 21, 1961. After its successful 16-minute suborbital flight, the Liberty Bell 7, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it. It quickly sank to a three-mile depth. Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. An underwater salvage expert, Newport located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y KSC-99pp1031

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gunther Wendt takes a turn at the podium after viewing the recovered Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule, seen in the background.  At right is Curt Newport who led the expedition to find and retrieve the capsule.  The expedition was sponsored by the Discovery Channel.   Wendt worked on the Liberty Bell 7 before its launch July 21, 1961. After its successful 16-minute suborbital flight, the Liberty Bell 7, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.  A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it.  It quickly sank to a three-mile depth.  Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. An underwater salvage expert, Newport located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader.  The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas,  where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y KSC-99pp1031

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Media and spectators get a close-up view of the Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule after its recovery from the Atlantic Ocean floor where it lay for 38 years. Launched July 21, 1961, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it. It quickly sank to a three-mile depth. Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. Curt Newport, an underwater salvage expert, located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader. The expedition was sponsored by the Discovery Channel. The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y KSC-99pp1032

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Media and spectators get a close-up view of the Liberty Bell 7 Project Mercury capsule after its recovery from the Atlantic Ocean floor where it lay for 38 years.   Launched July 21, 1961, the capsule made a successful 16-minute suborbital flight, with astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom aboard, and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.  A prematurely jettisoned hatch caused the capsule to flood and a Marine rescue helicopter was unable to lift it.  It quickly sank to a three-mile depth.  Grissom was rescued but his spacecraft remained lost on the ocean floor, until now. Curt Newport, an underwater salvage expert, located the capsule through modern technology, and after one abortive attempt, successfully raised it and brought it to Port Canaveral. The recovery of Liberty Bell 7 fulfilled a 14-year dream for the expedition leader. The expedition was sponsored by the Discovery Channel.  The capsule is being moved to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas,  where it will be restored for eventual public display. Newport has also been involved in salvage operations of the Space Shuttle Challenger and TWA Flight 800 that crashed off the coast of Long Island, N.Y KSC-99pp1032

US Navy (USN) Sailors and civilian personnel unload food and water from a USN UH-3H Sea King helicopter, brought in from Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola, Florida (FL), providing support and relief to victims of Hurricane Katrina at the Stennis Space Center (SSC), Mississippi (MS). The space center is being used as an evacuation center for hurricane refugees

US Navy (USN) Sailors and civilian personnel unload food and water from a USN UH-3H Sea King helicopter, brought in from Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola, Florida (FL), providing support and relief to victims of Hurricane Katrina at the Stennis Space Center (SSC), Mississippi (MS). The space center is being used as an evacuation center for hurricane refugees

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Seen here is Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter from Germany, who represents the European Space Agency. Other crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1047

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Seen here is Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter from Germany, who represents the European Space Agency.  Other crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1047

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Mission Commander Steven Lindsey is introducing the crew, from left: Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak, Lindsey, Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1039

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Mission Commander Steven Lindsey is introducing the crew, from left: Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak, Lindsey, Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency.  The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1039

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey pauses at a microphone to introduce the crew. Joining him are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak (partly visible at left), Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey pauses at a microphone to introduce the crew.  Joining him are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak (partly visible at left), Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Seen here at center is Mission Specialist Piers Sellers; at left is Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson. Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1045

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Seen here at center is Mission Specialist Piers Sellers; at left is Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson.  Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak  and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency.  The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1045

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Seen here at center is Pilot Mark Kelly. Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1042

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Seen here at center is Pilot Mark Kelly.  Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency.  The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1042

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After their arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-121 crew poses for a photo. From left are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak, Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter from Germany, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1048

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After their arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-121 crew poses for a photo.  From left are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak, Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter from Germany, who represents the European Space Agency.  The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1048

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Seen here at center is Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson; at right is Piers Sellers. Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1044

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Seen here at center is Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson; at right is Piers Sellers.  Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency.  The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1044

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey pauses at a microphone to introduce the crew. Joining him are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak (partly visible at left), Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1040

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey pauses at a microphone to introduce the crew.  Joining him are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak (partly visible at left), Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency.   The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1040

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Seen here is Mission Specialist Michael Fossum. Other crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Seen here is Mission Specialist Michael Fossum.  Other crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media. Seen here at center is Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak; at left is Pilot Mark Kelly. Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1043

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center aboard a Grumman G2 aircraft, the STS-121 crew gathers at a microphone for the media.  Seen here at center is Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak; at left is Pilot Mark Kelly.  Other crew members are Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency.  The crew is at the space center to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121.  It will carry supplies to the International Space Station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1043

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, passengers disembark from the shuttle carrier aircraft, or SCA, that carried space shuttle Endeavour back to the space center. The SCA will be towed into the mate/demate device that will lift the shuttle and put it back on the ground. After making the three-day trip from California, touchdown at Kennedy was at 2:44 p.m. EST. The SCA is a modified Boeing 747 jetliner. Endeavour landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California Nov. 30 to end mission STS-126. The return to Kennedy began Dec. 8 and took four days after stops across the country for fuel. The last stop was at Barksdale Air Force Base in Shreveport, La. Weather conditions en route and in Florida postponed the landing at Kennedy until Dec. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3984

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --  At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, passengers disembark from the shuttle carrier aircraft, or SCA, that carried space shuttle Endeavour back to the space center.  The SCA will be towed into the mate/demate device that will lift the shuttle and put it back on the ground. After making the three-day trip from California, touchdown at Kennedy was at 2:44 p.m. EST. The SCA is a modified Boeing 747 jetliner. Endeavour landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California Nov. 30 to end mission STS-126. The return to Kennedy began Dec. 8 and took four days after stops across the country for fuel. The last stop was at Barksdale Air Force Base in Shreveport, La.  Weather conditions en route and in Florida postponed the landing at Kennedy until Dec. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3984

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana talks to guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3311

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana talks to guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3311

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center's External Relations Director Lisa Malone hosts the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. On the right at the table at left are Florida Rep. Ralph Poppell and Center Director Bob Cabana. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3307

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center's External Relations Director Lisa Malone hosts the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. On the right at the table at left are Florida Rep. Ralph Poppell and Center Director Bob Cabana.  Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3307

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Introductions are made at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Seated at far right are Center Director Bob Cabana and, on the left, Florida Rep. Ralph Poppell. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3306

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Introductions are made at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Seated at far right are Center Director Bob Cabana and, on the left, Florida Rep. Ralph Poppell.  Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3306

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex enjoy reminiscing about the early days of the Space Shuttle Program with Center Director Bob Cabana, far right on stage. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3310

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex enjoy reminiscing about the early days of the Space Shuttle Program with Center Director Bob Cabana, far right on stage.  Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3310

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center's External Relations Director Lisa Malone introduces Florida Senator Thad Altman during the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Seated at far left is Center Director Bob Cabana. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government representatives heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3305

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center's External Relations Director Lisa Malone introduces Florida Senator Thad Altman during the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex.  Seated at far left is Center Director Bob Cabana.  Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government representatives heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3305

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana talks to guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3308

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana talks to guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3308

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana talks to guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3309

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana talks to guests at the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3309

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Florida Rep. Ralph Poppell (left) talks with Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana during the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3304

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Florida Rep. Ralph Poppell (left) talks with Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana during the annual Community Leaders Breakfast held in the Debus Center at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex. Community leaders, business executives, educators, community organizers and state and local government heard Cabana provide an overview of operations at the space center and a look ahead at upcoming missions and activities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3304

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a dragonfly is seen in the Launch Complex 39 area near the Press Site. Because female dragonflies lay their eggs in or near water, they are a common sight at the space center. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5321

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a dragonfly is seen in the Launch Complex 39 area near the Press Site. Because female dragonflies lay their eggs in or near water, they are a common sight at the space center.      Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5321

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a dragonfly is seen in the Launch Complex 39 area near the Press Site. Because female dragonflies lay their eggs in or near water, they are a common sight at the space center. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5319

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a dragonfly is seen in the Launch Complex 39 area near the Press Site. Because female dragonflies lay their eggs in or near water, they are a common sight at the space center.      Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5319

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a dragonfly is seen in the Launch Complex 39 area near the Press Site. Because female dragonflies lay their eggs in or near water, they are a common sight at the space center. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5320

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a dragonfly is seen in the Launch Complex 39 area near the Press Site. Because female dragonflies lay their eggs in or near water, they are a common sight at the space center.      Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5320

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members pose for a photo in front of 'Bumblebee,' while 'Optimus Prime' is on display to its right. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5030

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members pose for a photo in front of 'Bumblebee,' while 'Optimus Prime' is on display to its right. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5030

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members pose for a photo in front of 'Bumblebee.' "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5029

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members pose for a photo in front of 'Bumblebee.' "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5029

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image a Kennedy employee family member stands in front of 'Optimus Prime' for a photo op. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5027

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image a Kennedy employee family member stands in front of 'Optimus Prime' for a photo op. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5027

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members are gathered around 'Optimus Prime' for a photo op. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5033

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members are gathered around 'Optimus Prime' for a photo op. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5033

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image 'Optimus Prime' takes center stage. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5028

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image 'Optimus Prime' takes center stage. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5028

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members are able to peer inside of 'Bumblebee's' interior. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members are able to peer inside of 'Bumblebee's' interior. "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members are enjoying the opportunity to gather around 'Bumblebee.' "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5032

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA Kennedy Space Center employees in Florida were provided a unique photo opportunity on Oct. 8 from some of the robot 'stars' of the upcoming movie, "Transformers 3." Paramount Pictures filmed scenes for the movie at Kennedy from Oct. 4 through 8. As a show of appreciation for sharing the space center with the "Transformers 3" cast and crew, Kennedy employees and their families were invited to see two Transformers characters, Optimus Prime and Bumblebee, in their vehicle form, on display outside Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In this image Kennedy employee family members are enjoying the opportunity to gather around 'Bumblebee.' "Transformers 3" is due out in theaters summer 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux KSC-2010-5032

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A begins to move away from space shuttle Discovery. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. From here, cameras will catch the shuttle lift off amidst the space center's pristine wildlife refuge. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1574

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A begins to move away from space shuttle Discovery. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. From here, cameras will catch the shuttle lift off amidst the space center's pristine wildlife refuge.              Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1574

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A begins to move away from space shuttle Discovery. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. From here, cameras will catch the shuttle lift off amidst the space center's pristine wildlife refuge. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1575

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A begins to move away from space shuttle Discovery. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. From here, cameras will catch the shuttle lift off amidst the space center's pristine wildlife refuge.              Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1575