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Shuttle Enterprise Free Flight

Shuttle Enterprise Free Flight

View from forward center of NASA DFRC Mate-Demate Device (MDD) looking north-northeast. Visible on left is the North Personnel/equipment hoist, the Fold-down Nose Platform in center, and Rollout Platform for Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) forward attach point access above that.

View from forward center of NASA DFRC Mate-Demate Device (MDD) looking north-northeast.  Visible on left is the North Personnel/equipment hoist, the Fold-down Nose Platform in center, and Rollout Platform for Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) forward attach point access above that.

The 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, carrying the Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise piggyback, lifts off from the Shuttle Landing Facility's 15,000-foot-long runway at 11:03, August 10. Enterprise flown to KSC on April 10 for use in checking out assembly, test and launch facilities which will be used for the launch of its sister ship Columbia on the first Space Shuttle flight, will make a five-stop flight to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-7

The 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, carrying the Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise piggyback, lifts off from the Shuttle Landing Facility's 15,000-foot-long runway at 11:03, August 10.  Enterprise flown to KSC on April 10 for use in checking out assembly, test and launch facilities which will be used for the launch of its sister ship Columbia on the first Space Shuttle flight, will make a five-stop flight to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-7

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations. The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and function checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport. Enterprise will be tansported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, California. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-13

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations.  The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and function checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport.  Enterprise will be tansported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, California. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-13

The Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations. The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and fuction checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport. Enterprise will be transported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, CA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-12

The Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise is lowered to the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building during destacking operations. The Enterprise, mated to an external tank and twin inert solid rocket boosters, formed a nonlaunchable Space Shuttle which was used for fit and fuction checks of assembly, test and launch facilities at the nation's Spaceport. Enterprise will be transported to the Shuttle Landing Facility, mounted piggyback on its 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and flown to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, CA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-12

Right side view of the parked 747 Shuttle carrier aircraft with the Enterprise Space Shuttle Orbiter mounted on top

Right side view of the parked 747 Shuttle carrier aircraft with the Enterprise Space Shuttle Orbiter mounted on top

A view of the parked 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Enterprise Space Shuttle Orbiter mounted on top

A view of the parked 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Enterprise Space Shuttle Orbiter mounted on top

Right side view of the 747 Shuttle carrier aircraft carrying the Enterprise Space Shuttle Orbiter during take-off. The aircraft is flanked by two F-5 Tiger II aircraft

Right side view of the 747 Shuttle carrier aircraft carrying the Enterprise Space Shuttle Orbiter during take-off. The aircraft is flanked by two F-5 Tiger II aircraft

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Orbiter Columbia is separated from the shuttle carrier aircraft in the mate/demate device at KSC. Photo credit: NASA KSC-81PC-1045

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Orbiter Columbia is separated from the shuttle carrier aircraft in the mate/demate device at KSC.    Photo credit: NASA KSC-81PC-1045

SHUTTLE CARRIER AIRCRAFT (SCA) PILOT - ELLINGTON AFB (EAFB), TX

SHUTTLE CARRIER AIRCRAFT (SCA) PILOT - ELLINGTON AFB (EAFB), TX

Challenger Ferry Flight Flyover

Challenger Ferry Flight Flyover

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1298-06

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1298-06

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1296-02

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1296-02

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1298-02

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1298-02

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1298-05

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1298-05

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1296-01

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1296-01

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1297-11

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1297-11

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J. Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1297-06

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the new space shuttle, Atlantis, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The shuttle is mounted atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified Boeing 747. Over the next seven months Atlantis will be prepared for its maiden voyage, STS-51J.      Atlantis, NASA's fourth space-rated shuttle, was named after the two-masted boat that served as the primary research vessel for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts from 1930 to 1966. The boat had a 17-member crew and accommodated up to five scientists who worked in two onboard laboratories, examining water samples and marine life. Like its predecessors, Atlantis was constructed by Rockwell International in Palmdale, Calif. The spacecraft was transported over land from Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base on April 3, 1985 for the cross-country ferry flight to Kennedy. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/shuttleoperations/orbiters/atlantis-info.html Photo credit: NASA/Louie Rochefort KSC-385C-1297-06

STS-32 Return to KSC

STS-32 Return to KSC

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) lifts off the runway at Edwards AFB, California carrying the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105) on it back. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) lifts off the runway at Edwards AFB, California carrying the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105) on it back. Exact Date Shot Unknown

Endeavour is Delivered to the Kennedy Space Center

Endeavour is Delivered to the Kennedy Space Center

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) is pulled into position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), that is suspended beneath a massive lifting structure at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) is pulled into position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), that is suspended beneath a massive lifting structure at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) is pulled into position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), that is suspended beneath a massive lifting structure at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) is pulled into position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), that is suspended beneath a massive lifting structure at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in position beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour OV-105 (Orbiter Vehicle-105), suspended with a massive lifting structure, at Rockwell International's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, at Palmdale. The shuttle will be attached to the 747 SCA for transporting to the Kennedy Space Center, FLorida. Exact Date Shot Unknown

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39480 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is prepared for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911. Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4808

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39480 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is prepared for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911.     Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4808

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39477 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is mated to the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911, in preparation for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4807

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39477 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is mated to the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911, in preparation for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.       Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4807

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39486 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is prepared for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911. Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4809

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39486 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is prepared for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911.     Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4809

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39487 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is prepared for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911. Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4806

PALMDALE, Calif. -- S91-39487 -- A Rockwell worker at the space shuttle's Palmdale Final Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif., takes a technical documentation image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is prepared for its first ferry flight to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the agency's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, designated NASA 911.         Endeavour is scheduled to return to California in 2012, where it will be on public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Its ferry flight across America is targeted for mid-September. Endeavour was the last space shuttle added to NASA’s orbiter fleet. During the course of its 19-year career, Endeavour spent 299 days in space during 25 missions. For more information on shuttle transition and retirement work, visit http://www.nasa.gov/transition. Photo credit: NASA/ Rockwell International Space Systems Division KSC-2012-4806

Endeavour Arrival

Endeavour Arrival

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) with Space Shuttle Enterprise, OV-101, sits on the ramp at Koln Airport during a tour of Europe which included a stop at the Paris Air Show. Exact Date Shot Unknown

NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) with Space Shuttle Enterprise, OV-101, sits on the ramp at Koln Airport during a tour of Europe which included a stop at the Paris Air Show. Exact Date Shot Unknown

NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) with Space Shuttle Enterprise, OV-101, is greeted by a crowd at Koln Airport during a tour of Europe which included a stop at the Paris Air Show. Exact Date Shot Unknown

NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) with Space Shuttle Enterprise, OV-101, is greeted by a crowd at Koln Airport during a tour of Europe which included a stop at the Paris Air Show. Exact Date Shot Unknown

NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) with Space Shuttle Enterprise, OV-101, attached comes in for a landing at Koln Airport during a tour of Europe which included a stop at the Paris Air Show. Exact Date Shot Unknown

NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) with Space Shuttle Enterprise, OV-101, attached comes in for a landing at Koln Airport during a tour of Europe which included a stop at the Paris Air Show. Exact Date Shot Unknown

Endeavour with Columbia Ferry Flyby

Endeavour with Columbia Ferry Flyby

Endeavour on Runway with Columbia on SCA Overhead

Endeavour on Runway with Columbia on SCA Overhead

Atlantis Ferry Flight to Palmda

Atlantis Ferry Flight to Palmda

Endeavour on Shuttle Carrier Aircraft

Endeavour on Shuttle Carrier Aircraft

The orbiter Endeavour, riding atop the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), landed at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at about 9:44 a.m. today, completing is cross-country ferry flight from Palmdale, CA. Endeavour departed Palmdale at about 9 a.m. EST March 26 and stopped briefly for fuel at Ft. Worth Naval Air Station, TX. The vehicle then proceeded to Warner Robbins Air Force Base, GA, where it stayed overnight last night before departing for KSC this morning. Endeavour will be removed from the SCA today and transported to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 early tomorrow morning KSC-97pc550

The orbiter Endeavour, riding atop the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), landed at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at about 9:44 a.m. today, completing is cross-country ferry flight from Palmdale, CA. Endeavour departed Palmdale at about 9 a.m. EST March 26 and stopped briefly for fuel at Ft. Worth Naval Air Station, TX. The vehicle then proceeded to Warner Robbins Air Force Base, GA, where it stayed overnight last night before departing for KSC this morning. Endeavour will be removed from the SCA today and transported to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 early tomorrow morning KSC-97pc550

The orbiter Endeavour, riding atop the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), landed at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at about 9:44 a.m. today, completing is cross-country ferry flight from Palmdale, CA. Endeavour departed Palmdale at about 9 a.m. EST March 26 and stopped briefly for fuel at Ft. Worth Naval Air Station, TX. The vehicle then proceeded to Warner Robbins Air Force Base, GA, where it stayed overnight last night before departing for KSC this morning. Endeavour will be removed from the SCA today and transported to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 early tomorrow morning KSC-97pc549

The orbiter Endeavour, riding atop the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), landed at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at about 9:44 a.m. today, completing is cross-country ferry flight from Palmdale, CA. Endeavour departed Palmdale at about 9 a.m. EST March 26 and stopped briefly for fuel at Ft. Worth Naval Air Station, TX. The vehicle then proceeded to Warner Robbins Air Force Base, GA, where it stayed overnight last night before departing for KSC this morning. Endeavour will be removed from the SCA today and transported to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 early tomorrow morning KSC-97pc549

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Endeavour, riding atop the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), landed at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at about 9:44 a.m. today, completing its cross-country ferry flight from Palmdale, Calif. Endeavour departed Palmdale at about 9 a.m. EST March 26 and stopped briefly for fuel at Ft. Worth Naval Air Station, Texas. The vehicle then proceeded to Warner Robbins Air Force Base, Ga., where it stayed overnight last night before departing for KSC this morning. Endeavour will be removed from the SCA today and transported to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 early tomorrow morning KSC-97pc551

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Endeavour, riding atop the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), landed at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at about 9:44 a.m. today, completing its cross-country ferry flight from Palmdale, Calif. Endeavour departed Palmdale at about 9 a.m. EST March 26 and stopped briefly for fuel at Ft. Worth Naval Air Station, Texas. The vehicle then proceeded to Warner Robbins Air Force Base, Ga., where it stayed overnight last night before departing for KSC this morning. Endeavour will be removed from the SCA today and transported to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 early tomorrow morning KSC-97pc551

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis rolls out of the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its journey to the Shuttle Landing Facility where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis will then be ferried to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1662

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis rolls out of the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its journey to the Shuttle Landing Facility where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis will then be ferried to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1662

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis rolls from the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its journey to the Shuttle Landing Facility where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis will then be ferried to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1663

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis rolls from the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its journey to the Shuttle Landing Facility where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis will then be ferried to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1663

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis sits under the Mate/Demate Device at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility, where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale's Orbiter Assembly Facility where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis' future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis' next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1664

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis sits under the Mate/Demate Device at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility, where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale's Orbiter Assembly Facility where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis' future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis' next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1664

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Atlantis sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1665

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Atlantis sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1665

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, riding atop the modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, departed Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at 1:53 p.m. on Nov. 11 en route to Palmdale, Calif., for the planned Orbiter Maintenance Down Period. Atlantis departed from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33 for Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1667

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, riding atop the modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, departed Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at 1:53 p.m. on Nov. 11 en route to Palmdale, Calif., for the planned Orbiter Maintenance Down Period. Atlantis departed from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33 for Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1667

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC’s) Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif., for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. There, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1666

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC’s) Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif., for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. There, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1666

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, riding atop the modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, departed Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on Nov. 11 at 1:53 p.m. en route to Palmdale, Calif., for its planned Orbiter Maintenance Down Period. Atlantis departed from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33 for Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1668

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, riding atop the modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, departed Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on Nov. 11 at 1:53 p.m. en route to Palmdale, Calif., for its planned Orbiter Maintenance Down Period. Atlantis departed from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33 for Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1668

Shuttle Atlantis returning to Kennedy Space Center

Shuttle Atlantis returning to Kennedy Space Center

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Stairs are rolled to the forward opening of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with its piggyback cargo, the orbiter Atlantis after it rolls to a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Stairs are rolled to the forward opening of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with its piggyback cargo, the orbiter Atlantis after it rolls to a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with orbiter Atlantis on top arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1159

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with orbiter Atlantis on top arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1159

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with orbiter Atlantis on top touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with orbiter Atlantis on top touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft gently lands its piggyback cargo orbiter Atlantis at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1161

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft gently lands its piggyback cargo orbiter Atlantis at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis returns home after a 10-month stay in the Palmdale, CA, orbiter processing facility undergoing extensive inspections and modifications. They included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. The flight from Palmdale included a fueling stop in Ft. Hood, TX, and overnight stay at Ft. Campbell, KY. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1161

The orbiter Atlantis is towed away from the Shuttle Landing Facility after returning home from California atop its Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. The orbiter spent 10 months in Palmdale undergoing extensive inspections and modifications in the orbiter processing facility there. The modifications included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1164

The orbiter Atlantis is towed away from the Shuttle Landing Facility after returning home from California atop its Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. The orbiter spent 10 months in Palmdale undergoing extensive inspections and modifications in the orbiter processing facility there. The modifications included several upgrades enabling it to support International Space Station missions, such as adding an external airlock for ISS docking missions and installing thinner, lighter thermal protection blankets for weight reduction which will allow it to haul heavier cargo. Atlantis will undergo preparations in the Orbiter Processing Facility at KSC for its planned flight in June 1999 KSC-98pc1164

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, reaches to embrace his wife, Annie, after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. Behind the couple is the mate/demate device used to raise and lower the orbiter from its shuttle carrier aircraft during ferry operations. Glenn and other crewmembers flew into KSC to make final preparations for launch. Targeted for liftoff at 2 p.m. on Oct. 29, the STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. The mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC on Nov. 7. The other STS-95 crew members are Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) KSC-98pc1398

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, reaches to embrace his wife, Annie, after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. Behind the couple is the mate/demate device used to raise and lower the orbiter from its shuttle carrier aircraft during ferry operations. Glenn and other crewmembers flew into KSC to make final preparations for launch. Targeted for liftoff at 2 p.m. on Oct. 29, the STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. The mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC on Nov. 7. The other STS-95 crew members are Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) KSC-98pc1398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (right) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (right) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (left) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (left) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia rolls out of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, bound for the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device. At the SLF the orbiter is to be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1134

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia rolls out of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, bound for the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device. At the SLF the orbiter is to be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1134

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia (foreground) moves under the Mate-Demate Device at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The crane seen above it will lift the orbiter so that the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in the background can move underneath Columbia, which will then be attached to the back of the SCA for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter is the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1140

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Columbia (foreground) moves under the Mate-Demate Device at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The crane seen above it will lift the orbiter so that the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) in the background can move underneath Columbia, which will then be attached to the back of the SCA for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter is the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1140

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On an orbiter transporter, Columbia is turned, after rolling out of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, for its move to the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device. At the SLF the orbiter is to be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1136

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On an orbiter transporter, Columbia is turned, after rolling out of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, for its move to the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device. At the SLF the orbiter is to be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1136

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Aboard a transporter, the orbiter Columbia moves past the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Shuttle Landing Facility. There the orbiter will be mated to the SCA, with the help of a Mate-Demate Device, for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter is the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1139

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Aboard a transporter, the orbiter Columbia moves past the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Shuttle Landing Facility. There the orbiter will be mated to the SCA, with the help of a Mate-Demate Device, for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter is the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1139

On an orbiter transporter, Columbia is ready for its move to the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device (MDD), in the distance at the top of the photo. Seen next to the MDD is the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft which will carry the orbiter piggyback in a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or 'glass cockpit.' Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000. KSC-99PP-1137

On an orbiter transporter, Columbia is ready for its move to the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device (MDD), in the distance at the top of the photo. Seen next to the MDD is the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft which will carry the orbiter piggyback in a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or 'glass cockpit.' Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000. KSC-99PP-1137

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Aboard a transporter, the orbiter Columbia is moved on the tow-way along the Banana Creek. Columbia is heading to the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device where it will be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1138

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Aboard a transporter, the orbiter Columbia is moved on the tow-way along the Banana Creek. Columbia is heading to the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device where it will be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1138

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Photographed from overhead, the orbiter Columbia begins to turn after rolling out of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, bound for the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device. At the SLF the orbiter is to be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1135

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Photographed from overhead, the orbiter Columbia begins to turn after rolling out of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, bound for the Shuttle Landing Facility's (SLF) Mate-Demate Device. At the SLF the orbiter is to be mated to the Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1135

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the Shuttle Landing Facility, the orbiter Columbia leaves Kennedy Space Center on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig006

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the Shuttle Landing Facility, the orbiter Columbia leaves Kennedy Space Center on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig006

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is cast in morning shadows as it backs away from the Mate/Demate Device with the orbiter Columbia strapped to its back. The oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, Columbia is being ferried to Palmdale, Calif., where it will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility. The nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP) is the second in Columbia's history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1141

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is cast in morning shadows as it backs away from the Mate/Demate Device with the orbiter Columbia strapped to its back. The oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, Columbia is being ferried to Palmdale, Calif., where it will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility. The nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP) is the second in Columbia's history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1141

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the orbiter Columbia moves down the runway on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig008

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the orbiter Columbia moves down the runway on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig008

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, egrets along the runway take flight as the orbiter Columbia leaves Kennedy Space Center on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig007

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, egrets along the runway take flight as the orbiter Columbia leaves Kennedy Space Center on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig007

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the orbiter Columbia takes to the sky on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig009

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the orbiter Columbia takes to the sky on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig009

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the orbiter Columbia takes off into a clear sky on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig010

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the orbiter Columbia takes off into a clear sky on the back of a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on a ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif. On the rear of the orbiter can be seen the tail cone, a fairing that is installed over the aft fuselage of the orbiter to decrease aerodynamic drag and buffet when the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft is transporting the orbiter cross-country. It is 36 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 22 feet high. Columbia, the oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, will undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility during a nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP), the second in its history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99padig010

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with the orbiter Columbia strapped to its back, waits at the Shuttle Landing Facility for clear weather to take off for its final destination, Palmdale, Calif. The oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, Columbia is being ferried to Palmdale to undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility. The nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP) is the second in Columbia's history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1142

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with the orbiter Columbia strapped to its back, waits at the Shuttle Landing Facility for clear weather to take off for its final destination, Palmdale, Calif. The oldest of four orbiters in NASA's fleet, Columbia is being ferried to Palmdale to undergo extensive inspections and modifications in Boeing's Orbiter Assembly Facility. The nine-month orbiter maintenance down period (OMDP) is the second in Columbia's history. Orbiters are periodically removed from flight operations for an OMDP. Columbia's first was in 1994. Along with more than 100 modifications on the vehicle, Columbia will be the second orbiter to be outfitted with the multifunctional electronic display system, or "glass cockpit." Columbia is expected to return to KSC in July 2000 KSC-99pp1142

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility shows the fuel truck shelter (left), administrative building (center) with parking lot behind it (foreground), two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked on the apron and the mate/demate device (right). In the background is the runway. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC00pp1430

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility shows the fuel truck shelter (left), administrative building (center) with parking lot behind it (foreground), two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked on the apron and the mate/demate device (right). In the background is the runway. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC00pp1430

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility shows the fuel truck shelter (left), administrative building (center) with parking lot behind it (foreground), two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked on the apron and the mate/demate device (right). In the background is the runway. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC-00pp1430

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility shows the fuel truck shelter (left), administrative building (center) with parking lot behind it (foreground), two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked on the apron and the mate/demate device (right). In the background is the runway. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC-00pp1430

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) faces northeast, with the Atlantic Ocean in the distance. In the center is the apron of the SLF with two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked there, the mate/demate device behind them, a shelter for fuel trucks (foreground), and an administrative building between. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC-00pp1431

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) faces northeast, with the Atlantic Ocean in the distance. In the center is the apron of the SLF with two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked there, the mate/demate device behind them, a shelter for fuel trucks (foreground), and an administrative building between. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC-00pp1431

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) faces northeast, with the Atlantic Ocean in the distance. In the center is the apron of the SLF with two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked there, the mate/demate device behind them, a shelter for fuel trucks (foreground), and an administrative building between. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC00pp1431

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This aerial view of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) faces northeast, with the Atlantic Ocean in the distance. In the center is the apron of the SLF with two Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) parked there, the mate/demate device behind them, a shelter for fuel trucks (foreground), and an administrative building between. The STAs are Grumman Gulfstream 2 aircraft with converted cockpits that emulate those in the Shuttles for practice landings at the SLF. The mate/demate device is used to lift the orbiter onto or off a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft when it has to be ferried to or from KSC KSC00pp1431

Catching the glow of the late afternoon sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig080

Catching the glow of the late afternoon sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig080

Kicking up dust, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with its unique cargo on top, touches down on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1642

Kicking up dust, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with its unique cargo on top, touches down on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1642

In late afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California where the orbiter landed more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig079

In late afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California where the orbiter landed more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig079

The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) and its unique cargo Discovery on top rest in the shadows from the setting sun behind them. Discovery will be lifted off the SCA via the mate/demate device and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1645

The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) and its unique cargo Discovery on top rest in the shadows from the setting sun behind them. Discovery will be lifted off the SCA via the mate/demate device and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1645

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique cargo Discovery on top, is towed to the mate/demate device at the SLF. Discovery will be lifted off the SCA and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1644

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique cargo Discovery on top, is towed to the mate/demate device at the SLF. Discovery will be lifted off the SCA and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1644

In the glow of a late afternoon sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig078

In the glow of a late afternoon sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig078

In the soft glow of a soon-to-set sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, gently touches down on the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig076

In the soft glow of a soon-to-set sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, gently touches down on the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig076

In late afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California where the orbiter landed more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig079

In late afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California where the orbiter landed more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig079

On a warm afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, rolls down the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig077

On a warm afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, rolls down the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig077

On a warm afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, rolls down the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig077

On a warm afternoon, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, rolls down the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig077

In the soft glow of a soon-to-set sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, gently touches down on the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig076

In the soft glow of a soon-to-set sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique orbiter passenger attached to its back, gently touches down on the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The SCA is returning Discovery to KSC after the orbiter’s California landing at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00padig076

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique cargo Discovery on top, is towed to the mate/demate device at the SLF. Discovery will be lifted off the SCA and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1643

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), with its unique cargo Discovery on top, is towed to the mate/demate device at the SLF. Discovery will be lifted off the SCA and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC-00pp1643

Kicking up dust, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with its unique cargo on top, touches down on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00pp1642

Kicking up dust, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with its unique cargo on top, touches down on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00pp1642

Catching the glow of the late afternoon sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig080

Catching the glow of the late afternoon sun, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) rolls down the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility as it returns the orbiter Discovery to KSC. The ferry flight started in California after the orbiter’s landing more than a week ago at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of mission STS-92. Discovery wears a tail cone protecting its aft nozzles for the ferry flight. Discovery will be demated from the SCA via the mate/demate device at the SLF and transported to the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. There it will undergo preparations for its next launch, STS-102, scheduled for February 2001 KSC00padig080

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-97 crew pose for a photo on the parking area. Behind them are the T-38 jet aircraft that brought them. From left, they are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Joe Tanner and Marc Garneau (with the Canadian Space Agency); Commander Brent Jett; and Pilot Mike Bloomfield. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training, familiarization with the payload, and a simulated launch countdown. In the background, top, is the mate/demate device that is used to load or unload an orbiter from the back of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. In the background left is a Shuttle Training Aircraft. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:05 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1641

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-97 crew pose for a photo on the parking area. Behind them are the T-38 jet aircraft that brought them. From left, they are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Joe Tanner and Marc Garneau (with the Canadian Space Agency); Commander Brent Jett; and Pilot Mike Bloomfield. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training, familiarization with the payload, and a simulated launch countdown. In the background, top, is the mate/demate device that is used to load or unload an orbiter from the back of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. In the background left is a Shuttle Training Aircraft. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:05 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1641

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-97 crew pose for a photo on the parking area. Behind them are the T-38 jet aircraft that brought them. From left, they are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Joe Tanner and Marc Garneau (with the Canadian Space Agency); Commander Brent Jett; and Pilot Mike Bloomfield. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training, familiarization with the payload, and a simulated launch countdown. In the background, top, is the mate/demate device that is used to load or unload an orbiter from the back of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. In the background left is a Shuttle Training Aircraft. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:05 p.m. EST KSC00pp1641

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-97 crew pose for a photo on the parking area. Behind them are the T-38 jet aircraft that brought them. From left, they are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Joe Tanner and Marc Garneau (with the Canadian Space Agency); Commander Brent Jett; and Pilot Mike Bloomfield. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training, familiarization with the payload, and a simulated launch countdown. In the background, top, is the mate/demate device that is used to load or unload an orbiter from the back of the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. In the background left is a Shuttle Training Aircraft. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:05 p.m. EST KSC00pp1641

<i>[Photo courtesy of Boeing photographer Bob Williams.]</i> The orbiter Columbia sits under a mate/demate device at Boeing’s Orbiter Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif. It is waiting to be mated to Shuttle Carrier Aircraft no. 905 for its ferry flight to Kennedy Space Center. Columbia has been undergoing modifications and upgrades at the Boeing plant. Ferry preparations and the flight plan are contingent upon weather conditions in California and enroute to Florida KSC01padig093

<i>[Photo courtesy of Boeing photographer Bob Williams.]</i> The orbiter Columbia sits under a mate/demate device at Boeing’s Orbiter Assembly Facility in Palmdale, Calif. It is waiting to be mated to Shuttle Carrier Aircraft no. 905 for its ferry flight to Kennedy Space Center. Columbia has been undergoing modifications and upgrades at the Boeing plant. Ferry preparations and the flight plan are contingent upon weather conditions in California and enroute to Florida KSC01padig093

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A firetruck stands by as the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with its cargo the orbiter Columbia comes to a stop at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Skid Strip. Columbia’s ferry flight began in California March 1. Unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Dyess AFB, Texas, until it could return to Florida. Columbia is returning from a 17-month-long modification and refurbishment process as part of a routine maintenance plan. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-107, scheduled Oct. 25 KSC01padig129

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A firetruck stands by as the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with its cargo the orbiter Columbia comes to a stop at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Skid Strip. Columbia’s ferry flight began in California March 1. Unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Dyess AFB, Texas, until it could return to Florida. Columbia is returning from a 17-month-long modification and refurbishment process as part of a routine maintenance plan. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-107, scheduled Oct. 25 KSC01padig129

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Media (foreground) capture the orbiter Columbia atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft as it taxis down the runway. A helicopter hovers in the background. The SCA and its cargo landed at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Skid Strip. The ferry flight began in California March 1. Unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Dyess AFB, Texas, until it could return to Florida. Columbia is returning from a 17-month-long modification and refurbishment process as part of a routine maintenance plan. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-107, scheduled Oct. 25 KSC01padig128

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Media (foreground) capture the orbiter Columbia atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft as it taxis down the runway. A helicopter hovers in the background. The SCA and its cargo landed at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Skid Strip. The ferry flight began in California March 1. Unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Dyess AFB, Texas, until it could return to Florida. Columbia is returning from a 17-month-long modification and refurbishment process as part of a routine maintenance plan. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-107, scheduled Oct. 25 KSC01padig128

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with the orbiter Atlantis on top, is towed around the turn to to the parking area at the Shuttle Landing Facility. There it will be demated from the orbiter in the mate/demate device. Atlantis landed in California Feb. 19 concluding mission STS-98. The ferry flight began in California March 1; unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Altus AFB, Okla., until it could return to Florida. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-104, the 10th construction flight to the International Space Station, scheduled June 8 KSC-01pp0496

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with the orbiter Atlantis on top, is towed around the turn to to the parking area at the Shuttle Landing Facility. There it will be demated from the orbiter in the mate/demate device. Atlantis landed in California Feb. 19 concluding mission STS-98. The ferry flight began in California March 1; unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Altus AFB, Okla., until it could return to Florida. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-104, the 10th construction flight to the International Space Station, scheduled June 8 KSC-01pp0496

The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with its piggyback cargo the orbiter Atlantis, is towed to the parking area at the Shuttle Landing Facility. There it will be demated from the orbiter in the mate/demate device. Atlantis landed in California Feb. 19 concluding mission STS-98. The ferry flight began in California March 1; unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Altus AFB, Okla., until it could return to Florida. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-104, the 10th construction flight to the International Space Station, scheduled June 8 KSC-01pp0497

The Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with its piggyback cargo the orbiter Atlantis, is towed to the parking area at the Shuttle Landing Facility. There it will be demated from the orbiter in the mate/demate device. Atlantis landed in California Feb. 19 concluding mission STS-98. The ferry flight began in California March 1; unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Altus AFB, Okla., until it could return to Florida. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-104, the 10th construction flight to the International Space Station, scheduled June 8 KSC-01pp0497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, heads into the mate/demate device at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after a protracted trip from California. Atlantis landed in California Feb. 19 concluding mission STS-98. The ferry flight began March 1; unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Altus AFB, Okla., until it could return to Florida. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-104, the 10th construction flight to the International Space Station, scheduled June 8 KSC01padig122

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, heads into the mate/demate device at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after a protracted trip from California. Atlantis landed in California Feb. 19 concluding mission STS-98. The ferry flight began March 1; unfavorable weather conditions kept it on the ground at Altus AFB, Okla., until it could return to Florida. The orbiter will next fly on mission STS-104, the 10th construction flight to the International Space Station, scheduled June 8 KSC01padig122