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Pilot Office, Belfast

Alexandra Graving Dock, Belfast (2)

Skeppsvarvet, vy på norra sidan.

Union Iron Works /

Shipyards and Harbor, Newport News, Va.

S/S Olaus Olsson går av stapeln i Söderhamn 1902.

En brigg, förrådshus och bostadshus på varvet i Kalmar.

Building a Warship, Cramp's Shipyards, Philadelphia, Pa.

The Docks, Cramp's Shipyards, Philadelphia, Pa.

U.S. Reports: Western Union Telegraph Co. v. Chiles, 214 U.S. 274 (1909)

Kummelnäs varv.

Öresundsvarvet.

Varmbadshuset i förgrunden och Laboriatorieholmen och varvet i bakgrunden.

SkeppsvarvF. Schichau, Elbing

Fo45045A

American delegates visit shipyards in scotland

American delegates visit shipyards in Scotland. Mr. Wilson, Secretary of Labor putting a rivet into a ship

Ceremonies - Independence Day, 1918 - Independence Day Parade, New York City, July 4, 1918. The shipyards were represented by this float

Fredriks Jonssons varv 1918. 3 msk Göta, 198 br.reg.t. under byggnad. I förgrunden varvspersonalen. Längst t.h. varvsägaren och byggmästaren Fredrik Jonsson.

Fredriks Jonssons varv 1919. 3 msk Frejas spantresning. I förgrunden varvspersonalen. Längst t.v. varvsägaren och byggmästaren Fredrik Jonsson.

Fredriks Jonssons varv 1919. 3 msk Freja, 183 br.reg.t. under byggnad. I förgrunden varvspersonalen. Längst t.v. varvsägaren och byggmästaren Fredrik Jonsson.

Charleston, West Virginia. Shipyards at Charleston

Skeppsvarvet i Lödöse, Lödöse Varf AB.

Götaverken från flygplan.

Varv med fartyg vid Ekenäsviken.

How vessels are destroyed in the Virginia shipyards. Alex, Va.

Fo138627A

Tegelbyggnad med vällingklocka på varvet i Kalmar.

Varvsporten N:r 171930

Karlskrona örlogsvarv.Varvsporten nr 17 och varvsarbetare vid middagstid 1930.

I283

I329

Förrådsbyggnader med träfasader och cyklar lutande på väggarna på varvet i Kalmar.

Ett skeppsvarv med vällingklocka och järnvägsräls på varvsholmen.

Flygbild över Kungsörs båtvarv.

Stora kranen vid skeppsvarvet.

Kran i arbete på skeppsvarvet.

Lilla kranen vid skeppsvarvet.

Spår mot skeppsvarvet.

Spår mot skeppsvarvet.

Workers leaving Pennsylvania shipyards, Beaumont, Texas

Housing. Manitowac, Wisconsin. Three youthful residents of the 400-unit federal housing project, in Manitowac, Wisconsin, investigate the merits of a neighbor's bird bath. Operated by the National Housing Authority (NHA), this project includes 400 prefabricated demountable, steel channel frame and plywood units, which helps to alleviate the city's housing shortage. Principal residents of the project are naval and civilian employees of Manitowac's shipyards

A Syrian neighborhood near the shipyards. Slum area where many shipyard workers live. Winter Street, Quincy, Massachusetts

Parking lot with shipyards in background. Quincy, Massachusetts

House on Winter Street, Quincy, Massachusetts. Because of lack of parking facilities, people living in the vicinity of the shipyards are renting car space in their backyards and the lots around their houses for "fifty cents a week."

Sign advertising parking space in backlot of a private house in the vicinity of the shipyards in Quincy, Massachusetts

Lastplats vid hamnen.

Shipyards at Bethlehem steel mill. Sparrows Point, Maryland

Shipyards at Bethlehem steel mill. Sparrows Point, Maryland

Inside the home of Ralph Hart, a worker at the shipyards. Their house is one of a small settlement of shacks and houses that are springing up a few miles out of Bath

Housing. Manitowac, Wisconsin. Youngsters find plenty of room for play in one of Wisconsin's newest federal housing projects at Manitowac. Principal residents of the project, operated by the National Housing Authority (NHA) are naval and civilian employees of Manitowac's shipyards

A Syrian neighborhood near the shipyards. Slum area where many shipyard workers live. Winter Street, Quincy, Massachusetts

Poster. A careless word...another cross. Poster distributed by Office of War Information (OWI) to bowling alleys, shipyards, billiard halls, post offices, theatres, war plants, libraries, hotels. The original comes in two sizes: 28" x 40" and 22" x 28", and is printed in white against a brown-green background. Copies are obtainable from Division of Public Inquiries, Office of War Information, 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.

War Production Board poster. Poster produced by the WPB for distribution to shipyards. The original is 28 1/2 inches by 40 inches and is printed in full color. It was designed by the Office of War Information (OWI) from a painting by C.C. Beall. Copies may be obtained from Central Distribution Service, Office of Emergency Management (OEM), 1516 14th Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C.

Shipyards at Bethlehem steel mill. Sparrows Point, Maryland

A large parking lot with the shipyards in the background. Quincy, Massachusetts

Before Senate Wire Tapping committee. Washington, D.C., June 12. During an appearance before the Senate Wire Tapping Committee today, Joseph N. Pew, Jr., Pennsylvania Republican and official of the Sun Oil Co., flatly denied that he had engaged a private detective organization to 'watch' Democratic officials. However, he admitted that he hired Frank B. Bielaski, New York private detective, to 'watch stock transactions' in connection with a 'movement to rehabilitate' the Cramp Shipyards in Philadelphia. These shipyards, he said, were commercially unsound and could not be operated profitably

Shipyards at Bethlehem steel mill. Sparrows Point, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. All assembled and ready to go in place. Prefabrication of sections such as this in a nearby plant formerly making freight cars saves weeks in the building of ships for Uncle Sam's new merchant fleet. This piece is being hoisted into place, and soon the welder will begin his vital work. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. This maze of rolling cranes, at a large Eastern shipyard is a typical scene in many large shipyards at work on ships for Uncle Sam's Navy and merchant fleet. Stocks of material are piled up for the cranes to take to vessels under construction so there is no delay in production while waiting for sections or materials. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Red-hot, this steel plate is shaped on the mold to form a stern section for a member of the "Liberty Fleet," under construction at a large Eastern shipyard. The work is being done at a nearby plant formerly used for the building of freight cars. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. This is the bow of a new Liberty Fleet member, awaiting its hose or template at a large Eastern shipyard. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Workers at a prefabricating plant turn out steel parts for a large Eastern shipyard building units of Uncle Sam's "Liberty Fleet." Here they operate a giant shear. This plant was originally used to produce freight cars, and the shears are part of the plant's original equipment. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These are shell frames and deck brackets ready to be welded between deck beams and frames for ship of the Liberty Fleet under construction at a large Eastern yard. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. All assembled and ready to go in place. Prefabrication of sections such as this in a nearby plant formerly making freight cars saves weeks in the building of ships for Uncle Sam's new merchant fleet. This piece is being hoisted into place, and soon the welder will begin his vital work. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipyards at 4:00 p.m. Newport News, Virginia

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Most large shipyards have their own rail systems, with several locomotives and flat cars used for hauling heavy ship parts about the yards. This man operates such a locomotive transporting completed sections from a former freight car plant six miles to the ways where they are assembled into completed ships. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. This is the signal man of a riggers crew at a large Eastern shipyard. He is about ready to give the go-ahead signal to the operator of a large overhead electric crane. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Welding is one of the most important advances in shipbuilding during the present century with the torch resulting in immense savings in time, material and weight in the building of ships. This welder is joining side plates to angle frames forming section of the propeller shaft tunnels on a new member of Uncle Sam's Liberty ships, under construction at a large Eastern shipyard which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding (Norfolk Navy Yard). These are some of the 26,000 men whose hands are fashioning powerful new additions to Uncle Sam's rapidly expanding naval forces. A few miles away at the yards of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, other thousands are also coming off their shifts. This scene is typical of dozens of shipyards throughout the nation. Shipyard workers have a lot to smile about, for invariably they have done their work so well and efficiently that production is ahead of schedule

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Welding is more important than ever before in shipbuilding, saving time, weight and steel. This work is done at a nearby plant which formerly turned out freight cars. This worker is welding top plates to angle frames for a merchant ship under construction at a large Eastern yard. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These stacks of steel plate are in readiness for an uninterrupted flow toward the production line of a large Eastern plant fabricating sections for ships built at a nearby yard. This plant was formerly used for Pullman car construction. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These stacks of steel plate are in readiness for an uninterrupted flow toward the production line of a large Eastern plant fabricating sections for ships built at a nearby yard. This plant was formerly used for freight car construction. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Wooden templates are used as patterns for the laying out of a number of steel plates. This worker is carrying the template for a gun foundation from the mold loft to the plate working section. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Workers at a prefabricating plant turn out steel parts for a large Eastern shipyard building units of Uncle Sam's "Liberty Fleet." Here they operate a giant shear. This plant was originally used to produce freight cars, and the shears are part of the plant's original equipment. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Here are prefabricated tanks and deck girder sections ready to be hoisted up and set in their place in one of the new merchant ships under construction in a large Eastern shipyard. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Here are two members of the Liberty Fleet lying at anchor in the basin of a large eastern shipyard, awaiting final fitting and rigging. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Steel plates of wasteless dimensions stacked ready for laying out, one of the first operations on the production line of multiply cargo ship construction. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These are prefabricated inner bottom tank sections, ready to be set in place and welded into a unit. Fabricated in an old freight car plant, they will be used in ships of the "Liberty Fleet" being built in a large Eastern shipyard. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipyards at 4:00 p.m. Newport News, Virginia

Mail racks for occupants of the FSA (Farm Security Administration) duration dormitories for workers at the Navy shipyards. Bremerton, Washington

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These are prefabricated bulkhead sections for ships of the Liberty Fleet being welded together before they are hoisted into position in a new ship in front of a large Eastern yard. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Workman at Navy shipyards at FSA (Farm Security Administration) duration dormitories. Bremerton, Washington

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Electric welding is a vital skill in the building of Uncle Sam's new merchant fleet. This welder inserting a new rod in his charged holder, on one of the ships. Production scene in an Eastern shipyard. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Workman at Navy shipyards at FSA (Farm Security Administration) duration dormitories. Bremerton, Washington

Workmen at the Navy shipyards in the community room at the FSA (Farm Security Administration) duration dormitories. Bremerton, Washington

Launching of 10,000 ton ships. The first of 90 sister ships to be built for the Maritime Commission slides off the dock into the Atlantic. Launched just one year from the time construction work started on the shipyards, this 10,000 ton vessel is of the "Virginia Dare" type. In the future these ships will slide down the runway at the rate of one per week. From laying of keel to launching takes only 90 days

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Here are two members of the Liberty Fleet lying at anchor in the basin of a large Eastern shipyard. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These flatcars loaded with prefabricated and assembled sections for ships under construction at a large Eastern yard are leaving a nearby plant formerly used for the manufacture of Pullman cars. The work of this plant means many valuable months saved in the building of Uncle Sam's "Liberty Fleet." All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Man and wife from South Carolina. He just got a job in shipyards, moved into this one room apartment, rent eight dollars a week. Newport News, Virginia

Room in FSA (Farm Security Administration) dormitories occupied by women who work at the Navy shipyards. Bremerton, Washington

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. This is a travograph-oxy-acetylene machine, a cutter which treads its own pattern. Here it is cutting two identical floor plates for a tank section at the bottom of a new member of the "Liberty Fleet." The work is done at what was formerly a freight car plant now a large Eastern plant. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding (Norfolk Navy Yard). These are some of the 26,000 men whose hands are fashioning powerful new additions to Uncle Sam's rapidly expanding naval forces. A few miles away at the yards of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, other thousands are also coming off their shifts. This scene is typical of dozens of shipyards throughout the nation. Shipyard workers have a lot to smile about, for invariably they have done their work so well and efficiently that production is ahead of schedule

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Red-hot, this steel plate is shaped on the mold to form a stern section for a member of the "Liberty Fleet," under construction at a large Eastern shipyard. The work is being done at a nearby plant formerly used for the building of freight cars. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding (Norfolk Navy Yard). These are some of the 26,000 men whose hands are fashioning powerful new additions to Uncle Sam's rapidly expanding naval forces. A few miles away at the yards of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, other thousands are also coming off their shifts. This scene is typical of dozens of shipyards throughout the nation. Shipyard workers have a lot to smile about, for invariably they have done their work so well and efficiently that production is ahead of schedule

FSA (Farm Security Administration) duration dormitories for workers at the Navy shipyards. Bremerton, Washington

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Welding is more important than ever before in shipbuilding, saving time, weight and steel. This welder is working on the foundation for steel pillars to support the decks on top of the shaft tunnel of a new merchant ship under construction at a large Eastern plant. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Welding is one of the most important advances of the century in shipbuilding, saving time, steel and weight. This welder is working on the inside of a fuel tank in a ship of Uncle Sam's new "Liberty Fleet." All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. Welding is more important than ever before in shipbuilding, saving time, weight and steel. This work is done at a nearby plant which formerly turned out freight cars. These workers are doing a dual welding operation on fuel oil tanks for the bottom of a "Liberty Ship" under construction at a large Eastern yard. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flatcars. Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Boy from North Carolina. Family had just moved to Newport News, Virginia, for work in shipyards