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The Secrets of the Nine Luminaries (Kuyō hiryaku)

Kabuki Actors Ichikawa Yaozō II, Nakajima Mihoemon II, Ichikawa Ebizō III, and Ichimura Uzaemon IX in the Play Sugawara’s Secrets of Calligraphy (Sugawara denju tenarai kagami)

Kabuki Actors Ichikawa Yaozō II, Nakajima Mihoemon II, Ichikawa Ebizō III, and Ichimura Uzaemon IX in the Play Sugawara’s Secrets of Calligraphy (Sugawara denju tenarai kagami)

Kabuki Actors Ichikawa Yaozō II, Nakajima Mihoemon II, Ichikawa Ebizō III, and Ichimura Uzaemon IX in the Play Sugawara’s Secrets of Calligraphy (Sugawara denju tenarai kagami)

Bando Hikosaburo III as Sugawara no Michizane, from the Kabuki play, "Sugawara's Secrets of Calligraphy" (Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami)

The secrets of Troppeau

Secrets of the prison-house--a cell in the female department of the Washington jail / from a sketch made on the spot by our special artist, Mr. Lumley.

Les quatre secrets.

Little Secrets

The Case of Paul Beck, Rule-of-Thumb Detective: Cabinet Secrets

Secrets of the camouflage artists / by Helen Johns Kirtland, Leslie's staff correspondent.

"Hitherto I Have Performed it Myself": Six Dead Secrets, Topsy-Turvy Tales

John W. Robbins of the Comptrollers General's Office holds the secrets of 1,000,000 Americans [...] These secrets are in the form of packages containing the belongings of soldiers and Robbins task is to find surviving relatives and restore the packages to them

John W. Robbins of the Comptrollers General's Office holds the secrets of 1,000,000 Americans ... These secrets are in the form of packages containing the belongings of soldiers and Robbins task is to find surviving relatives and restore the packages to them

El-Azrak & Wadi Sirhan in the Arabian Desert. Druse [i.e., Druze] political refugees from Jebel Druse (The Hauran). A Druse A'kil, i.e., one who may be trusted with secrets of the order

Senate committee quizzes members on government cooperation given French mission. Washington, D.C., Feb. 16. Secretary of Treasury Henry Morgenthau and Secretary of War Harry H. Woodring were today questioned by the Senate Military Affairs Committee concerning the aid they gave a French Mission buying late model American-made fighting planes. Following the hearing Chairman Sheppard announced a transcript of the testimony, excluding what was considered military secrets, would be made public shortly. In the picture, left to right: Secretary Morgenthau, Chairman Andrew J. May of the House Military Affairs Committee; John W. Hanes, Undersecretary of the Treasury; Secretary Woodring; and Assistant Secretary of War Louis Johnson, 2-16-39

Aluminum casting. Before metal can be poured into the mold, this wooden superstructure will be completely filled with sand. Technically, it's known as facing sand on coperflask and placing of gaggers. But in anybody's language, it's one of the many operations necessary to complete molds in which vital aluminum parts for the armed forces will be cast. What the exact object being cast is, is one of the army's secrets. Aluminum Industries Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio

Washington, D.C. Sister Aquinas, "flying nun," exchanging trade secrets with an engineer at the Washington National Airport

Labels. In enemy-occupied countries where matches are scarce, five tons of them have been circulated by methods which must remain military secrets for the present. They carry this message to every match lighter: "The Four Freedoms--Freedom to speak, Freedom to worship, Freedom to think, Freedom from want."

Historic Route 66 - Holding the Secrets of Route 66

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin removing the lower sections of the canister surrounding NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0700

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers remove another section of the canister surrounding NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0701

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin to remove the canister around the top of the NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0698

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers look over NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite after sections of the canister have been removed. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0703

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers check out the protective cover placed over the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0702

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers oversee the removal of the canister from the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0699

NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite sits ready for the fairing installation at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0717

A worker in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, watches as the first segment of the fairing is maneuvered around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. At the lower left in the photo can be seen a camera installed on the second stage of the rocket to record the separation of the fairing several minutes after launch. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0720

A camera is shown mounted on the second stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket scheduled to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite June 24 from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The camera will record the separation of the fairing encircling the satellite, which should occur several minutes after launch. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0716

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers oversee the lifting of the fairing (right) into the tower. At left is NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite around which the fairing will be fitted. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0718

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide the first segment of the fairing around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. At the lower left can be seen a camera installed on the second stage of the rocket to record the separation of the fairing several minutes after launch. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0721

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide the first segment of the fairing around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0719

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (foreground) is partially covered by half of the fairing (behind it) that will protect it during launch. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0722

STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), prepares to leave the T-38 jet aircraft that brought him to KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) are arriving for pre-launch activities. Tognini is making his inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0824

The STS-93 crew leave the Shuttle Landing Facility after answering questions for the media and posing for photographers, whose shadows stretch across the SLF. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins (waving), Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.), and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. The crew arrived at KSC for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0830

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins poses for photographers in the early morning sun after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0828

After arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-93 crew speak to the media about their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.), Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Commander Eileen M. Collins. Hawley has the most Shuttle flights, this being his fifth. Collins is making her third flight (the first as a commander), Coleman is making her second flight, and Ashby and Tognini are making their first flights. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0827

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins waves to spectators after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0822

Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. greets STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins after her arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (behind her). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0826

STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby lands at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. STS-93 is Ashby's inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0823

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins peers into the eastern early morning sky after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0829

STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) shows her sense of humor upon arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Coleman is making her second Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0825

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team poses with Astronauts (from left) Steven W. Lindsey, Nancy Jane Currie and Laurel B. Clark. The team arrived at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0884

Upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0889

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0872

STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves to her family nearby, a last meeting before launch of mission STS-93 on July 20. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0865

Among those gathered at the VIP viewing site for the launch of STS-93 are First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (center) and Donna Shalala, secretary , Department of Health and Human Services (far right). Also present is Chelsea Clinton. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0895

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves while a suit tech adjusts her boot, part of the launch and entry suit, during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0868

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0869

Space Shuttle Columbia catches the rising sun after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0862

The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back from Space Shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39-B, in preparation for launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0861

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) waves after donning her launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0871

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA Astronaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper (left) upon her arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0886

Members of the U.S. World Cup Soccer Team pose with Astronauts Scott Parazynski, Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven W. Lindsey, and Nancy Jane Currie and NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin after the team's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. The team arrived with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0892

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the VIP Lounge, Apollo/Saturn V Center, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton gets ready to speak to the group gathered there before the launch of STS-93. At right is NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0893

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) smiles after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0867

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronaut Nancy Jane Currie upon Mrs. Clinton's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Waiting at left are Astronauts Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper and Steven W. Lindsey. Mrs. Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea (far right) are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0890

The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Columbia is due to launch Tuesday, July 20, at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0866

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Next to Gold are (from left) Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0888

Space Shuttle Columbia, sitting on its mobile launcher platform, is framed against the early morning sky after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0863

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon her arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station as her teammates look on. The team is at KSC to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 scheduled for liftoff at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0885

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The group waiting in the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the launch of STS-93 pose for a photo. Among the spectators gathered are First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, astronauts, and attendees of a Women in Space forum, including Donna Shalala, secretary , Department of Health and Human Services. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0894

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronauts (from left) Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven W. Lindsey, and Nancy Jane Currie upon Mrs. Clinton's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. She and her daughter, Chelsea (far right) are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0891

Generating her own attention waiting for the launch of STS-93 at the VIP viewing site is Chelsea Clinton, daughter of the President and Mrs. Clinton. The First Lady and Chelsea arrived earlier to view the launch. Much attention has been generated over STS-93 due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0897

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0880

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0879

The rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on launch Pad 39-B reveals Space Shuttle Columbia on its mobile launcher platform, waiting for the launch of mission STS-93 on July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0864

Members of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team were greeted upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station by Astronauts (right) Steven W. Lindsey, Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper and Scott E. Parzynski. The team are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0887

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (right) chats with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and others while waiting for the launch of STS-93. Much attention has been generated over STS-93 due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0896

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the "Astrovan," which will transport them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0873

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waits after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his helmet. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0870

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.)gets help donning his launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0920

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations for the second time. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0917

The STS-93 crew gathers a second time for a pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0914

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) gets help with her launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0918

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves after donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0919

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building for the second time enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0921

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins gets help donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0915

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations for the second time, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waves after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his boot. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0916

Flanked by security, the STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they head for the "Astrovan" a second time to take them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After the July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0922

US Air Force Airmen train in a maintenance shop to learn the RC-135 engine's secrets. Young troops are getting valuable in-house training, improving their effectiveness on the flight line. Engine reliability has soared since the course has put out better trained techs. This image was used in the May 2000 AIRMAN Magazine article "Working Wonders with Engines."

Secrets of the Noachian Highlands: Pit Craters

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tucked inside a Pegasus XL rocket, attached to the under belly of this Orbital Stargazer L-1011 aircraft, the HESSI spacecraft is being carried approximately 113 nautical miles east-southeast of Cape Canaveral to an altitude of about 39,000 feet for release. During its planned two-year mission HESSI will study the secrets of how solar flares are produced in the Sun's atmosphere. Launch of HESSI in mid-air over the Atlantic Ocean is scheduled for 3:26 p.m. EST KSC-02pd0099

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Emerging through the smoke and steam, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. KSC-05pp0138

Ring Scan Spilling Secrets

Secrets of Schröteri

A Saucerful of Secrets

Unmasking the Secrets of Mercury

Uncovering the secrets of the Quintuplet Cluster

Secrets of Hidden Valley on Mars

Secrets Revealed from Pluto Twilight Zone

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

[Design drawing for stained glass window showing life: God to Man/Adam and Eve, Man to Man/Doctor delivering baby, and Man to God?/Woman scientist seeking "secrets of life"]

[Design drawing for stained glass window showing life: God to Man/Adam and Eve, Man to Man/Doctor delivering baby, and Man to God?/Woman scientist seeking "secrets of life"]

[Design drawing for stained glass window showing life: God to Man/Adam and Eve, Man to Man/Doctor delivering baby, and Man to God?/Woman scientist seeking "secrets of life"]

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible the continuance of Houdini's master mysteries.

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible the continuance of Houdini's master mysteries.

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible the continuance of Houdini's master mysteries.