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Brahe, Tycho

Brahe, Tycho

Brahe, Tycho

Brahe, Tycho

Brahe, Tycho

[Roger bacon conducting an experiment]

Boyle, Robert

Portret van Robert Boyle

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Robert Boyle

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

Boyle, Robert

[Roger Bacon, 1214?-1294; head and shoulders, facing left, reading Tract de Alchym]

Gemma Frisius / Esme de Boulonois, fe.

Brahe, Tycho

Bacon, Roger

Bacon, Francis

Brahe, Tycho

Francis Bacon from "[The Castles and Abbeys of England ... Illustrated by ... engravings.]"

[Tomb of Croce-Spinelli and Sivel (French scientists), killed in the crash of the balloon Zenith, 15 Apr. 1875]

Scientists assert that all diseases can be prevented by inoculation / J. Keppler.

Gruppeportrett, to unge kvinner, sannsynlig Thekla Ragnhild Resvoll (1871-1948), botaniker, sittende.

Gruppeportrett, fem unge kvinner, sannsynlig Thekla Ragnhild Resvoll (1871-1948), botaniker, sittende nederst til høyre.

Portrett, sannsynlig Thekla Ragnhild Resvoll (1871-1948), botaniker.

"Portrait of Pasteur"

Mit freundlichen Grüssen, Peter Fireman, Washington, D.C., Octob. 19, 1899 / Smith and Buck, 1113 F St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Fellows of the Geological Society of America 1899

Scientists and naval officers exploring the ruins of St. Pierre - covered with volcanic ashes from Mont Pelée, Martinique, W.I.

Kvinne i landskap, Hanna Resvoll-Holmsen stående ved Adamsfjordfossen i Laksefjord, Lebesby. Hun står ved telt med ulike beholdere utenfor, i bakgrunnen trestativ (hjell?) med fisk m.m. til tørk.Del av serie fra en forskningsreise i Øst-Finnmark 1909.

Women scientists: standing: Miss Nellie A. Brown; L to R: Miss Lucia McCollock, Miss Mary K. Bryan, Miss Florence Hedges, The women scientists make cultures of the parasites make [...]ulation experiments and all sorts of technical laboratory work

[Professor Cleveland Abbe, first head of U.S. Weather Bureau, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left] / Clinedinst, Washington, D.C.

C.H. Kidurell? Chemist ..., Oct. 1419

Miss Margaret D. Foster, Uncle Sam's only woman chemist, Oct. 419

SCIENTISTS GROUP

Prof. R.O. Marsh, noted Explorer, with the 3 white Indians he discovered in Panama. They were brought to Wash. and will remaine at the New Willard Hotel where they will be examined by leading scientists of the Govt. L. to r.: Prof. Marsh, Marguerite, Chepu, Ole, and Mrs. Marsh, wife of the explorer

Manne Siegbahnlaboratoriet vid Stockholms Universitet.

Manne Siegbahnlaboratoriet vid Stockholms Universitet.

This boat with a special receiving was left by scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey in a trip through the Grand Canyon of Colo. in 1923. This set with the oars as an aerial picked up news of the death of Pres. Harding three-quarters of an hour after his death. This was quite some feat considering the set was 3,000 ft. below sea level and 100 degrees in the shade

Manne Siegbahnlaboratoriet vid Stockholms Universitet.

To "shoot" the sun. Capt. Edward T. Pollock (left) and Capt. F.B. Littell, scientists of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, will ha[...] charge of the expedition to observe the total solar eclipse of [...] sun from a giant dirigible, "Los Angeles" on Jnuary, 24th

Scientists for Uncle Sam awarded Magellan Gold Medal. Dr. L.J. Briggs, left, Assistant Director and Dr. Paul R. [Heyl?], Chief of the Sound Section of the United States Bureau of Standards, with the first successful experimental model of the earth inductor compass, which they developed for the Army Air Corps and for which they were awarded the Magellan Gold Medal by the American Philosophical Society. It was a model of this same compass that Capt. Charles Lindbergh used on his epochal flight from New York to Paris

Corp. of scientists from Carnegie Institute broadcast over CBS

Makes light speak like Biblical burning bush. Like the voice speaking to Moses from the burning bush as described in the Bible, Sergius P. Grace, Assistant Vice-President of the Bell Telephone Laboratories, makes speech and music issue from the burning electric arc in the center of the projector shown in the photograph. Alexander Graham Bell first experimented with the "talking flame" as early as 1875, using bright rays of sunlight as the base. Bell scientists are again working on the theory, hoping to make some practical use of it. Grace, at the left, is assisted by R.M. Pease, right, a member of the Bell technical staff. 12/30

Physicists at the Seventh Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, Belgium, October 1933

Gulf Oil Company

Paintings. Abraham Lincoln with scientists in conference room of National Academy of Sciences II

Edison receives first anti-glare lamp. Washington, D.C., May 17. Charles Edison, Asst. Sec. of the Navy and son of the late Thomas A. Edison, left; was presented with the first Polaroid lighting unit, a lamp free from glaring reflection. The lamp, praised by scientists as heralding a great advance in artificial illumination, employs the regulation incandescent light source as perfeted by Thomas A. Edison but passes the light through a sheet of the new light controlling material, Polaroid, to remove the light waves responsible for refelcted glare, one of the worst visual hazards of illumination, George W. Wheelwright, 3rd. who helped in the development made the presentation, 5/14/38

Paintings. Abraham Lincoln with scientists in conference room of National Academy of Sciences I

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Geophysical Service Inc., Dallas

Production of butylene glycol. Dr. George E. Ward turns a valve in one of the experimental fermentation vats in which corn is being converted into butylene glycol at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Peoria, Illinois. This is part of the laboratory work that led to the development of a fermentation process for converting corn and other grains into butylene glycol on a semi-commercial scale. Butylene glycol can be used in making anti-freeze for automobiles and in the production of commercial solvents for various manufacturing purposes. Department scientists have succeeded on a laboratory scale in turning butylene glycol into butadiene, from which synthetic rubber can be made. Now they are trying to do it on a semi-commercial scale

Production of butylene glycol. Dr. Lynferd J. Wickerham selects the bacteria that will convert corn into butylene glycol at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Peoria, Illinois. This is one step in the research that led to the development of a fermentation process for converting corn into butylene glycol, which has proved successful on a semi-commercial scale. Butylene glycol, hitherto a relatively rare chemical, can be used in making anti-freeze for automobiles and in the production of commercial solvents for various purposes. In the laboratory, the scientists have succeeded in turning butylene glycol into butadiene, from which synthetic rubber can be made. The next step is to find a way to carry out this process on a larger scale

Production of butylene glycol. Corn for which new industrial uses are sought is milled at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Peoria, Illinois. A fermentation process for converting grain into butylene glycol, developed in the laboratory, has proved successful on a semi-commercial scale in the pilot plant. Butylene glycol, hitherto a relatively rare chemical, can be used in making anti-freeze for automobiles and in the production of commercial solvents for various manufacturing purposes. Department scientists have succeeded on a laboratory scale in turning butylene glycol into butadiene, from which synthetic rubber can be made. The problem now is to develop a practical commercial process

Production of butylene glycol. Dr. George E. Ward inspects two types of pure butylene glycol made from corn at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Peoria, Illinois. Dr. Ward and his associates developed a fermentation process for converting corn and other grains into butylene glycol that has given good results on a semi-commercial scale. This chemical can be used in making anti-freeze for automobiles and in the production of solvents for various manufacturing processes. Department scientists have succeeded on a laboratory scale in turning butylene glycol into butadiene, which can be used in making synthetic rubber. Now they are trying to do it on a semi-commercial scale

Production of butylene glycol. P. Burke Jacobs checks the milling of corn for which new industrial uses are sought at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Peoria, Illinois. A method for converting corn and other grains into butylene glycol by the action of bacteria, developed in the laboratory, has proven effective on a semi-commercial scale in the pilot plant. This chemical can be used in making anti-freeze for automobiles and in the production of commercial solvents for various manufacturing purposes. Department scientists have succeeded on a laboratory scale in turning butylene glycol into butadiene, from which synthetic rubber can be made. Now they are trying to do it on a semi-commercial scale

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER - ONE OF AMERICA'S GREAT SCIENTISTS

Down from their place of honor on a Crocker Lab wall come the original dees of the 60-inch cyclotron, replaced during an overhaul in 1944. Attaching the cables for the move are Crocker scientists, left to right: Mike Scardigno, Bob Druet, Bart Jones, and John Francis. Dees will remain at Lawrence Radiation Lab. Morgue 1962-87 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Beltsville, Maryland. Indian scientists visiting the Agricultural Research Center. Left to right: Dr. E.E. Berkley, Dr. E.C. Auchter, Dr. N. Ahmad, Dr. H.W. Barre and Dr. H.D. Barker

Washington, D.C. A group of leading Indian scientists who arrived in the United States on Dec. 8, 1944, for an eight weeks tour of the country. They had just completed a tour of England and were anxious to meet leading United States scientists in the fields of physics and chemistry. Left to right seated: Sir Jnan C. Gsosh, Prof. J.N. Mukherjee, and Dr. N. Ahmad. Standing: Dr. M.N. Saha, Dr. F.S. Coan, United States State Department, Dr. S.K. Mitra and Sir S.S. Bhatnagar

Sinclair Refining laboratory... at Corpus Christi

Beltsville, Maryland. Indian scientists visiting the Agricultural Research Center. Left to right: Dr. E.C. Auchter, Prof. J.N. Mukherjee, Dr. N. Ahmad, Dr. Salter

Beltsville, Maryland. Indian scientists visiting the Agricultural Research Center. Left to right: Dr. E.C. Auchter, Prof. J.N. Mukherjee, Dr. N. Ahmad, Dr. Salter

Beltsville, Maryland. Indian scientists visiting the Agricultural Research Center. Left to right: Dr. H.D. Barker, Dr. E.E. Berkley, Dr. B.B. Robinson, Dr. J.O. Ware, Dr. N. Ahmad (seated), Dr. H.W. Barre

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

Henri Becquerel [Atomic Scientists]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists]

[Atomic Scientists]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

Marie Sklodowska Curie [Atomic Scientists]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

[Atomic Scientists (Medicine)]

Diver, having passed through the anticeptic i.e. antiseptic germicide trap, enters the germ-free animal colony