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Saturn v rocket saturn 5 rocket saturn, science technology.

Saturn v rocket saturn 5 rocket saturn, science technology.

Iconographic Drawing of Saturn (Doyō)

Iconographic Drawing of Saturn (Doyō)

Saturn from BL Harley 4431, f. 100v

Saturn from BL Harley 4431, f. 100v

Adrastus and Saturn from BL Harley 4431, f. 118v

Adrastus and Saturn from BL Harley 4431, f. 118v

Saturn from BL Harley 4431, f. 100v

Saturn from BL Harley 4431, f. 100v

[Earth-centered universe, with orbits of moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the firmament in concentric circles]

[Earth-centered universe, with orbits of moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the firmament in concentric circles]

Saturn in the guise of a horse being suckled by the nymph Philyra

Saturn in the guise of a horse being suckled by the nymph Philyra

Saturn from The Gods Who Preside Over the Planets

Saturn from The Gods Who Preside Over the Planets

Plate 1: Saturn in a niche devouring his son, standing before a scythe, from a series of mythological gods and goddesses

Plate 1: Saturn in a niche devouring his son, standing before a scythe, from a series of mythological gods and goddesses

Plate 1: Saturn in a niche devouring his son, standing before a scythe, from a series of mythological gods and goddesses

Plate 1: Saturn in a niche devouring his son, standing before a scythe, from a series of mythological gods and goddesses

Saturn, from Planets, plate 1

Saturn, from Planets, plate 1

Saturn holding an Infant and a Scythe, from The Seven Planets

Saturn holding an Infant and a Scythe, from The Seven Planets

Saturn, from The Seven Planets

Saturn, from The Seven Planets

Panel with figure of Saturn, plate 1

Panel with figure of Saturn, plate 1

The First Fruits of the Earth Offered to Saturn

The First Fruits of the Earth Offered to Saturn

Saturn (from The Planets)

Saturn (from The Planets)

[Musical scales or range of sound ascribed by Kepler to Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Earth, Venus, and Mercury; and surrounding text]

[Musical scales or range of sound ascribed by Kepler to Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Earth, Venus, and Mercury; and surrounding text]

Saturn, from 'Game of Mythology' (Jeu de la Mythologie)

Saturn, from 'Game of Mythology' (Jeu de la Mythologie)

Saturn, from 'Game of Mythology' (Jeu de la Mythologie)

Saturn, from 'Game of Mythology' (Jeu de la Mythologie)

Rhea Outwitting Saturn

Rhea Outwitting Saturn

Another view of the remains of the Pronaos of the Temple of Concord [The Temple of Saturn with Arch of Septimius Severus in left background], from Vedute di Roma (Views of Rome), part I

Another view of the remains of the Pronaos of the Temple of Concord [The Temple of Saturn with Arch of Septimius Severus in left background], from Vedute di Roma (Views of Rome), part I

Putto as Saturn

Putto as Saturn

View of the so-called Temple of Concord with the Temple of Saturn, on the right the Arch of Septimius Severus

View of the so-called Temple of Concord with the Temple of Saturn, on the right the Arch of Septimius Severus

planet from "L'Espace céleste et la nature tropicale, description physique de l'univers ... préface de M. Babinet, dessins de Yan' Dargent"

planet from "L'Espace céleste et la nature tropicale, description physique de l'univers ... préface de M. Babinet, dessins de Yan' Dargent"

planet from "L'Espace céleste et la nature tropicale, description physique de l'univers ... préface de M. Babinet, dessins de Yan' Dargent"

planet from "L'Espace céleste et la nature tropicale, description physique de l'univers ... préface de M. Babinet, dessins de Yan' Dargent"

[Temple of Saturn and Triumphal Arch of Septimus Severus, Rome, Italy]

[Temple of Saturn and Triumphal Arch of Septimus Severus, Rome, Italy]

Saturn's rings from "The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers"

Saturn's rings from "The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers"

Saturn's rings from "The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers"

Saturn's rings from "The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers"

The planet Saturn

The planet Saturn

Columns of the Temple of Saturn, in the Forum, Rome, Italy

Columns of the Temple of Saturn, in the Forum, Rome, Italy

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Commemorative plaque, attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle - Saturn Apollo Program

Commemorative plaque, attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 12 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 12 - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I H-1 engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I H-1 engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - I S-I stage is being assembled

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program -  I S-I stage is being assembled

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - eight H-1 engines

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - eight H-1 engines

Saturn V F-1 Engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V F-1 Engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks  - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V J-2 engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V J-2 engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program J-2 engine undergoes static firing

Saturn Apollo Program J-2 engine undergoes static firing

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - Saturn-I first stage (S-1 stage) being transported to the test stand

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - Saturn-I first stage (S-1 stage) being transported to the test stand

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program - at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program - at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama

Saturn I S-IV stage (second stage) - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I S-IV stage (second stage) - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - testing of the Saturn I S-I (first) stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - testing of the Saturn I S-I (first) stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V first stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V first stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I in the fabrication and engineering laboratory - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I in the fabrication and engineering laboratory - Saturn Apollo Program

Installation the H-1 engines into the S-IB stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Installation the H-1 engines into the S-IB stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - the first stage of the Saturn I

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program -  the first stage of the Saturn I

Saturn I fuel tanks - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I fuel tanks - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - Cluster of eight H-1 engines

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - Cluster of eight H-1 engines

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program - J-2 engine

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program - J-2 engine

Saturn Apollo Program - The J-2 engine for Saturn V S-IVB

Saturn Apollo Program - The J-2 engine for Saturn V S-IVB

J-2 engine at Rocketdyne's Canoga Park, California - Saturn Apollo Program

 J-2 engine at Rocketdyne's Canoga Park, California - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I RL-10 engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I RL-10 engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program - F-1 rocket engine

Saturn Apollo Program - F-1 rocket engine

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I Booster - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I liquid oxygen tank - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I liquid oxygen tank - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program H-1 engine

Saturn Apollo Program H-1 engine

Saturn I engine test pad - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I engine test pad - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I test - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I test - Saturn Apollo Program

NASA officials, (left to right) Charles W. Mathews; Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC); Dr. George E. Mueller, Associate Administrator for Marned Space Flight; and Air Force Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, Apollo Program Director celebrate the successful launch of Apollo 11 in the control room at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on July 16, 1969. Boosted by the Saturn V launch vehicle, the Apollo 11 mission with a crew of three: Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin, made the first manned lunar landing. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. von Braun. n/a

NASA officials, (left to right) Charles W. Mathews; Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC); Dr. George E. Mueller, Associate Administrator for Marned Space Flight; and Air Force Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, Apollo Program Director celebrate the successful launch of Apollo 11 in the control room at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on July 16, 1969. Boosted by the Saturn V launch vehicle, the Apollo 11 mission with a crew of three: Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin, made the first manned lunar landing. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. von Braun. n/a

Saturn Rocket Scale Model in the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

Saturn Rocket Scale Model in the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

Saturn C1 - Apollo Program

Saturn C1 - Apollo Program

Saturn I S-I stage with eight H-1 engines - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I S-I stage with eight H-1 engines - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I stages - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I stages - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn 1 launch vehicle - Apollo Program

Saturn 1 launch vehicle -  Apollo Program

The static firing of a Saturn F-1 engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Static Test Stand. The F-1 engine is a single-start, 1,5000,000 Lb fixed-thrust, bipropellant rocket system. The engine uses liquid oxygen as the oxidizer and RP-1 (kerosene) as fuel. The five-engine cluster used on the first stage of the Saturn V produces 7,500,000 lbs of thrust. n/a

The static firing of a Saturn F-1 engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Static Test Stand.  The F-1 engine is a single-start, 1,5000,000 Lb fixed-thrust, bipropellant rocket system. The engine uses liquid oxygen as the oxidizer and RP-1 (kerosene) as fuel. The five-engine cluster used on the first stage of the Saturn V produces 7,500,000 lbs of thrust. n/a

Saturn I S-1 stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I S-1 stage - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I launch vehicle - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I launch vehicle - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I test - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I test - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program - SA-1 booster (Saturn I S-I stage)

Saturn Apollo Program - SA-1 booster (Saturn I S-I stage)

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 11, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods above the 18 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 11, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods above the 18 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site. n/a

The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation's space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. They were briefed on MSFC's manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. Pictured left-to-right are Dieter Grau, MSFC; Konrad Dannenberg, MSFC; James G. Fulton, Republican representative for Pennsylvania; Joe Waggoner, Democratic representative for Louisiana; and Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of MSFC. n/a

The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation's space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. They were briefed on MSFC's manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. Pictured left-to-right are Dieter Grau, MSFC; Konrad Dannenberg, MSFC; James G. Fulton, Republican representative for Pennsylvania; Joe Waggoner, Democratic representative for Louisiana; and Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of MSFC. n/a

Marshall Space Center construction progress

Marshall Space Center construction progress

Nova rocket - Early Program Development

Nova rocket - Early Program Development

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

ARTIST CONCEPT - SATURN - LAUNCH - CAPE

ARTIST CONCEPT - SATURN - LAUNCH - CAPE

Artist Concept - Saturn Launch

Artist Concept - Saturn Launch

Aero Spacelines B-377PG Pregnant Guppy on ramp in preparation for flight tests and pilot evaluation E62-8887

Aero Spacelines B-377PG Pregnant Guppy on ramp in preparation for flight tests and pilot evaluation E62-8887

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken October 26, 1962, depicts the excavation process of the single engine F-1 stand. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related  facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken October 26, 1962, depicts the excavation process of the single engine F-1 stand. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken November 15, 1962, depicts the excavation process of the single engine F-1 stand site. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related  facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken November 15, 1962, depicts the excavation process of the single engine F-1 stand site. n/a

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

INTERIORS, PAD 34 BLOCKHOUSE, NASA/SATURN KSC-62-9387

INTERIORS, PAD 34 BLOCKHOUSE, NASA/SATURN KSC-62-9387