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STS089-S-005 (22 Jan. 1998) --- The space shuttle Endeavour cuts a bright swath through the dark sky as it blazes a trail toward the Russian Mir Space Station. Endeavour lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 9:48:15 p.m. (EST), Jan. 22, 1998. STS-89 represents the eighth docking mission with Mir (all previous such flights utilized the Atlantis). After the docking with Mir, Andrew S. W. Thomas, mission specialist, will transfer to the station, succeeding astronaut David A. Wolf as guest cosmonaut researcher. Wolf will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Thomas is expected to live and work on Mir until June 1998. Other crew members onboard were Terrence W. Wilcutt, Joe F. Edwards Jr., Bonnie J. Dunbar, James F. Reilly, Michael P. Anderson and Salizhan S. Sharipov. Sharipov represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Photo credit: NASA sts089-s-005

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles Precourt (left) talks to Elena V. Kondakova and her husband, Valery Ryumin, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency (RSA) and STS-91 mission specialist, at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The STS-91 crew had just arrived at the SLF aboard T-38 jets in preparation for launch. Kondakova, also a cosmonaut with the RSA, flew with Commander Precourt as a mission specialist on STS-84 which launched on May 15, 1997. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 on Space Shuttle Discovery with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc662

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston, Texas -- STS088(S)002 -- Five NASA astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut assigned to the STS-88 mission, scheduled for an early December launch, take time out from their busy training agenda for a crew portrait. Seated in front are Sergei K. Krikalev, a mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist. In the rear, from the left, are astronauts Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist; Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; and James H. Newman, mission specialist. KSC-98PC-1737

STS088-S-005 (4 Dec. 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 3:35:34 a.m. (EST), December 4, 1998, from Launch Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Onboard were astronauts Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, along with Russian Space Agency (RSA) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, all mission specialists. sts088-s-005

STS088-S-008 (4 Dec. 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 3:35:34 a.m. (EST), December 4, 1998, from Launch Pad 39A, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Onboard were astronauts Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, along with Russian Space Agency (RSA) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, all mission specialists. sts088-s-008

STS088-S-006 (4 Dec. 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 3:35:34 a.m. (EST), December 4, 1998, from Launch Pad 39A, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Onboard were astronauts Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, along with Russian Space Agency (RSA) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, all mission specialists. sts088-s-006

STS088-S-010 (15 Dec. 1998) --- NASA's final Space Shuttle mission of 1998 came to an ending with the landing of the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Following a 4.6 million-mile journey, astronaut Robert D. Cabana, mission commander, guided the Orbiter down onto runway 15 with landing gear touchdown occurring at 10:54 p.m. (EST) January 15, 1998. Others onboard were astronauts Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; mission specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie and James H. Newman; along with cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, who represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA). sts088-s-010

STS088-S-011 (15 Dec. 1998) --- NASA's final Space Shuttle mission of 1998 came to an ending with the landing of the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Following a 4.6 million-mile journey, astronaut Robert D. Cabana, mission commander, guided the Orbiter down onto runway 15 with landing gear touchdown occurring at 10:54 p.m. (EST) January 15. Others onboard were astronauts Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; mission specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie and James H. Newman; along with cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, who represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA). sts088-s-011

99-E-14665 (27 February 1999) --- Astronauts Edward T. Lu (left) and Jeffrey N. Williams check out full-scale training hardware for the International Space Station (ISS) in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. The two mission specialists, along with other members of the STS-101 crew, are currently in training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center for next year's STS-101 mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Editor's Note: Since this photograph was taken, changes in crew personnel have been made. Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14665

99-E-14662 (27 February 1999)--- From the left, astronauts Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward T. Lu, along with cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, familiarize themselves with training hardware at the Hydrolab facility in Star City, Russia. The three mission specialists, along with other members of their seven person crew, are currently training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center for next year's scheduled STS-101 mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Editor's Note: Since this photograph was taken, changes in crew personnel have been made. Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14662

99-E-14654 (October 1999) --- Astronaut Edward T. Lu, mission specialist, is assisted by SCUBA-equipped divers during a rehearsal of STS-106 space walk chores in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. Also participating in this simulation but out of frame here was cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, mission specialist who represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14654

99-E-14657 (October 1999) --- Astronaut Edward T. Lu, mission specialist, is assisted by SCUBA-equipped divers during an underwater rehearsal of STS-106 space walk chores in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. Also participating in this simulation but out of frame here was cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14657

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-102 Mission Specialist Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), looks at part of the cargo on the Integrated Cargo Carrier. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Usachev, and Mission Specialists James Voss and Susan Helms as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1423

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look at part of the cargo for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1426

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew pose for a photograph with SPACEHAB workers in front of the International Cargo Carrier, which will carry cargo to the International Space Station (ISS). The crew are, left to right, Mission Specialists James Voss, Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and Susan Helms. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1425

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., help members of the STS-102 crew become familiar with the Integrated Cargo Carrier and elements of its cargo for their mission. Starting second from left are Mission Specialists James Voss and Susan Helms and, fourth from left, cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Voss, Helms and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1422

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look at part of the equipment on the Integrated Cargo Carrier that will be on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, James Voss and Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000. KSC-99pp1424

At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look over the Integrated Cargo Carrier and the Russian crane Strela as part of familiarization activities. Starting second to left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and James Voss. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Voss, Helms and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1421

STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), pose in front of the U.S. Lab module, named Destiny, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1429

STS-102 crew members at left are briefed by workers (right) in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) on equipment for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1428

Inside the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), a technician (right) explains use of the equipment in front of (left) STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1427

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1492
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA) check out part of the Russian crane Strela. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1491

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1493
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission. At left are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1489

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission. At left are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1489
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission. At left are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1489

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn how to manipulate the Russian crane Strela. At left is Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA); in the center is Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right is Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov (RSA). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1490

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn how to manipulate the Russian crane Strela. At left is Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA); in the center is Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right is Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov (RSA). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1490
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn how to manipulate the Russian crane Strela. At left is Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA); in the center is Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right is Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov (RSA). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1490

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), stand inside the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, part of the payload for their mission. They and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko (also with RSA), are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1502

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), stand inside the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, part of the payload for their mission. They and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko (also with RSA), are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1502
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), stand inside the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, part of the payload for their mission. They and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko (also with RSA), are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1502

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39-A, the STS-111 and Expedition Five crews take time out from a tour of the pad with their friends and family to pose for a group portrait. From left, they are STS-111 Pilot Paul Lockhart, STS-111 Commander Kenneth Cockrell, Expedition Five Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA), Expedition Five astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition Five cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA), and STS-111 Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. Expedition Five is traveling to the International Space Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition Four, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Known as Utilization Flight 2, STS-111 is carrying supplies and equipment to the Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002 KSC-02pd0814

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA) steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0845

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA) waves as he dons his launch and entry suit for the scheduled liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour at 7:44 p.m. EDT. This is Treschev's first Shuttle flight. Expedition 5 is traveling on mission STS-111 to the International Space Station to replace the current resident crew, Expedition 4. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. KSC-02pd0831

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews look toward spectators as they head for the waiting Astrovan that that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also onboard Space Shuttle Endeavour is the Expedition 5 crew who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. KSC-02pd0838

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews eagerly stride from the Operations and Checkout Building toward the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson and Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA); cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also onboard Space Shuttle Endeavour is the Expedition 5 crew who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. KSC-02pd0837

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews relax at the traditional crew meal before getting ready for launch. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin (CNES); cosmonauts Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Valeri Korzun (RSA) and astronaut Peggy Whitson, the Expedition 5 crew; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. In front of them is the traditional cake. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also onboard Space Shuttle Endeavour is the Expedition 5 crew who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. Launch is scheduled at 7:44 p.m. EDT, May 30, 2002 KSC-02pd0821

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 Commander Valery Korzun (RSA) steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0844

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA), left, talks with astronaut Tracy Caldwell during suitup for the scheduled liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour at 7:44 p.m. EDT. This is Korzun's 2nd Shuttle flight. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. In addition, Expedition 5 is traveling on mission STS-111 to the International Space Station to replace the current resident crew, Expedition 4, who will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew KSC-02pd0836

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch meal before the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin (CNES); the Expedition 5 crew cosmonauts Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Valeri Korzun (RSA) and astronaut Peggy Whitson; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. In front of them is the traditional cake. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-02pd0875

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews hurry from the Operations and Checkout Building for a second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA) and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-02pd0887

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews eagerly exit from the Operations and Checkout Building for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. It is the second launch attempt in six days. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA) and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-02pd0885

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew strides out of the Checkout and Operations Building on their way to the launch pad and a simulated countdown. On the left, front to back, are Pilot Pamela Melroy and Mission Specialists David Wolf and Fyodor Yurchikhin (RSA). On the right, front to back, are Commander Jeffrey Ashby and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Piers Sellers. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. KSC-02pd1343

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to the launch pad for a simulated countdown. From left are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin (RSA), David Wolf and Piers Sellers; Pilot Pamela Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus; and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. KSC-02pd1344

A large plumb of smoke rises into the air following the detonation of an explosive device at the Emergency Disposal Range, at the Naval Magazine, at Santa Rita Naval Base, Guam (GU), during the Annual Multi-national Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Exercise known as TRICARB 2006." US Navy (USN), Royal Australian Navy (RAN), and Royal Singapore Navy (RSA) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) personnel came together to participate in the training event

[Hurricane Ike] Houston, Texas, September 17, 2008 -- Sargent Stan Parker of the Harris County Sheriff's office starting the day moving commodity-laden trucks from the Reliance Center Staging Area (RSA) to Points of Distribution (PODs) in the greater Houston area. FEMA facilitates loads of ice, water, and food being delivered and distributed to residents in disaster affected areas. Mike Moore/FEMA

[Hurricane Ike] Houston, Texas, September 17, 2008 -- Harris County Sheriff's Department Deputies directing the early morning roll-out of trucks from the Reliance Center Commodity Staging Site (RSA) bound for Points Of Distribution (PODs) in the greater Houston area. FEMA facilitates loads of ice, water, and food being delivered and distributed to residents in disaster affected areas. Mike Moore/FEMA

[Hurricane Ike] Houston, Texas, September 17, 2008 -- Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff (left) being briefed by Eric Smith (right) FEMA Assistant Administrator for Logistics at the Reliance Center Commodity Staging Site (RSA) in Houston. The RSA is dispatching trucks of ice, bottled water, and Meals Ready to Eat (MRE) to Points of Distribution (POD) in the Houston area in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. Mike Moore/FEMA

Dauphin Street cast iron and the RSA Tower, Mobile, Alabama

RSA Battle House Tower, Mobile, Alabama

Convention Center and RSA Tower stand tall against the beautiful sky in Mobile, Alabama

RSA Battle House Tower, Mobile, Alabama

RSA Battle House Tower, Mobile, Alabama

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018638

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018644

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018625

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018633

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018645

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018642

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018643

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018626

Soyuz 30/31 Crew Press Conference (Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka (RSA), Sergei Revin (RSA). Photo Date: January 11, 2012. Location: Building 2N, Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2012e018639

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004344

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004353

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004350

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004352

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004340

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004335

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004346

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004336

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004351

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004343

Expedition 36 (Soyuz 34) press conference with Chris Cassidy (NASA), Alexander Misurkin (RSA), and Pavel Vinogradov (RSA). Photo Date: January 17, 2013. Location: Building 2N - Press Conference Room. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e004337

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092075

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092092

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092095

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092090

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092085

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092086

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092079

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092083

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092073

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092077

Soyuz 41 crew members Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov (RSA) and Samantha Cristoforetti (ESA) during Routine Ops training with instructor Josh Matthew. Photo Date: October 24, 2013. Location: Building 9NW - ISS Mockups. Photographer: Robert Markowitz jsc2013e092093

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091588

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091586

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091582

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091581

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091583

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091592

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091580

Date: 10-30-13 Location: Bldg 9NW, ISS Mockup Subject: Expedition 41/42 crew member and RSA cosmonaut Elena Serova during rack and hatch skills training in ISS mockups. Photographer: James Blair jsc2013e091593

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008215

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008199

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008197

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008185

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008216

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008214

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008186

PHOTO DATE: 01-22-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2N, Press Conf. Room SUBJECT: Expedition 40 (Soyuz 38) press conference with Steve Swanson (NASA), Alexander Skvortsov (RSA), and Oleg Artemyev (RSA). PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e008217

PHOTO DATE: 07-16-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2s - PAO Studio B SUBJECT: Expedition 41/42 Crew News Conference with crew members Elena Serova (RSA), Alexander Samokutyaev (RSA) and Barry "Butch" Wilmore. PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e065913

PHOTO DATE: 07-16-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2s - PAO Studio B SUBJECT: Expedition 41/42 Crew News Conference with crew members Elena Serova (RSA), Alexander Samokutyaev (RSA) and Barry "Butch" Wilmore. PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e065937

PHOTO DATE: 07-16-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2s - PAO Studio B SUBJECT: Expedition 41/42 Crew News Conference with crew members Elena Serova (RSA), Alexander Samokutyaev (RSA) and Barry "Butch" Wilmore. PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e065945

PHOTO DATE: 07-16-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 2s - PAO Studio B SUBJECT: Expedition 41/42 Crew News Conference with crew members Elena Serova (RSA), Alexander Samokutyaev (RSA) and Barry "Butch" Wilmore. PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD jsc2014e065948