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Apollo 11 start rocket launch.

Apollo 11 start rocket launch.

Antares orb 3 launch failure rocket.

Antares orb 3 launch failure rocket.

Rocket launch rocket take off, science technology.

Rocket launch rocket take off, science technology.

Weapon rocket fight.

Weapon rocket fight.

Rocket start spaceport, science technology.

Rocket start spaceport, science technology.

Air force aircraft fighter jet.

Air force aircraft fighter jet.

Rocket soyuz rocket soyuz, science technology.

Rocket soyuz rocket soyuz, science technology.

Soyuz rocket launch rocket, science technology.

Soyuz rocket launch rocket, science technology.

Bumper V-2 Launch

Bumper V-2 Launch

The First Redstone Rocket Firing

The First Redstone Rocket Firing

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Thor/Able 3 Launch Vehicle

Thor/Able 3 Launch Vehicle

Launch of Little Joe I-B from Wallops Island

Launch of Little Joe I-B from Wallops Island

First Saturn (SA-1) Launch

First Saturn (SA-1) Launch

Ham Launch

Ham Launch

The Launch of Mercury-Redstone

The Launch of Mercury-Redstone

Thor-Delta-5-Launch Vehicles

Thor-Delta-5-Launch Vehicles

Launch of Mercury-Redstone vehicle 2 on Jan. 21, 1961

Launch of Mercury-Redstone vehicle 2 on Jan. 21, 1961

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Launch of Friendship 7

Launch of Friendship 7

Launch of the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission

Launch of the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission

Launch Vehicles - Atlas-Agena-4

Launch Vehicles - Atlas-Agena-4

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Photograph of Aurora 7 Lifting Off

Photograph of Aurora 7 Lifting Off

Photograph of Liftoff of Aurora 7 Spacecraft

Photograph of Liftoff of Aurora 7 Spacecraft

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-7 - ASTRONAUT CARPENTER - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-7 - ASTRONAUT CARPENTER - CAPE

Artist Concept - Saturn Launch

Artist Concept - Saturn Launch

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Photograph of a Rocket Launch at the Wallops Island Launch Area in Virginia

Photograph of a Rocket Launch at the Wallops Island Launch Area in Virginia

View of the liftoff of Little Joe II

View of the liftoff of Little Joe II

The Saturn I (SA-4) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, March 28, 1963. The fourth launch of Saturn launch vehicles developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern. Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. Like SA-3, the SA-4 flight’s upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for "Project Highwater" physics experiment. Release of this vast quantity of water in a near-space environment marked the second purely scientific large-scale experiment. The SA-4 was the last Block I rocket launch. n/a

The Saturn I (SA-4) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, March 28, 1963. The fourth launch of Saturn launch vehicles developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern.  Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. Like SA-3, the SA-4 flight’s upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for "Project Highwater" physics experiment. Release of this vast quantity of water in a near-space environment marked the second purely scientific large-scale experiment. The SA-4 was the last Block I rocket launch. n/a

The Saturn I (SA-4) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, March 28, 1963. The fourth launch of Saturn launch vehicles, developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern. Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. Like SA-3, the SA-4 flight’s upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for "Project Highwater" physics experiment. Release of this vast quantity of water in a near-space environment marked the second purely scientific large-scale experiment. The SA-4 was the last Block I rocket launch. n/a

The Saturn I (SA-4) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, March 28, 1963. The fourth launch of Saturn launch vehicles, developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern.  Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. Like SA-3, the SA-4 flight’s upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for "Project Highwater" physics experiment. Release of this vast quantity of water in a near-space environment marked the second purely scientific large-scale experiment. The SA-4 was the last Block I rocket launch. n/a

Lunar Orbiter I Launch

Lunar Orbiter I Launch

Gemini 8 Launched by Titan Booster

Gemini 8 Launched by Titan Booster

Gemini-Titan 11 Launch

Gemini-Titan 11 Launch

AS-203 Launch

AS-203 Launch

Workers at Cape Kennedy watched a Saturn 1B lift off

Workers at Cape Kennedy watched a Saturn 1B lift off

GT-4 Launch

GT-4 Launch

Early Rockets - Agena Target Vehicle

Early Rockets - Agena Target Vehicle

Apollo 4 liftoff

Apollo 4 liftoff

Mariner 5 Launch

Mariner 5 Launch

Apollo Project - Liftoff of Lunar Orbiter III

Apollo Project - Liftoff of Lunar Orbiter III

Saturn IB - Apollo 5 - Apollo Program

Saturn IB - Apollo 5 - Apollo Program

Apollo 9 (Saturn V launch vehicle, SA-504) launch

Apollo 9 (Saturn V launch vehicle, SA-504) launch

The second Saturn V launch vehicle (SA-502) for the Apollo 6 mission

The second Saturn V launch vehicle (SA-502) for the Apollo 6 mission

Apollo 7 Launch

Apollo 7 Launch

A Saturn 1B space launch vehicle lifts off from Launch Complex 34 carrying Apollo 7 astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr., Donn F. Eisele and Walter Cunningham

A Saturn 1B space launch vehicle lifts off from Launch Complex 34 carrying Apollo 7 astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr., Donn F. Eisele and Walter Cunningham

Apollo 7 Launch

Apollo 7 Launch

Apollo 8 mission lifted off

Apollo 8 mission lifted off

Launch of Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission

Launch of Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission

Launch of Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission

Launch of Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission

GT-4 Launch

GT-4 Launch

Apollo 11 Launched Via Saturn V Rocket

Apollo 11 Launched Via Saturn V Rocket

Apollo 11 Launched Via the Saturn V Rocket-High Angle View

Apollo 11 Launched Via the Saturn V Rocket-High Angle View

Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

LAUNCH - APOLLO 9 - CAPE

LAUNCH - APOLLO 9 - CAPE

LAUNCH - APOLLO 9 - CAPE

 LAUNCH - APOLLO 9 - CAPE

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Launch Vehicles

Launch Vehicles

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifted off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from KSC's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-393

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifted off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from KSC's Launch Complex 39A.  During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment.  They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-393

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The American flag heralds the flight of Apollo 11, man's first lunar landing mission. The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifted off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT from KSC's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The American flag heralds the flight of Apollo 11, man's first lunar landing mission.  The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifted off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT from KSC's Launch Complex 39A.  During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment.  They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifts off with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and willl deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifts off with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and willl deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle rises past the launch tower as it lifts off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from KSC's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-391

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle rises past the launch tower as it lifts off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from KSC's Launch Complex 39A.  During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment.  They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-391

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifts off with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and willl deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-420

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifts off with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and willl deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-420

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifted off with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-442

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifted off with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. at 9:32 a.m. EDT July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-442

Apollo 12 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 12 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 13 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 13 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 14 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 14 - Saturn Apollo Program

Launch - Apollo XIV - Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Launch - Apollo XIV -  Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Launch - Apollo 14 Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Launch - Apollo 14 Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Launch - Apollo 14 Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Launch - Apollo 14 Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Launch of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission

Launch of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission

Launch - Apollo XV Space Vehicle - KSC

Launch - Apollo XV Space Vehicle - KSC

Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) - Saturn Apollo Program

Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) - Saturn Apollo Program

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 15's Saturn V rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 9:34 a.m., EDT, July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Aboard the Apollo 15 spacecraft are astronauts David R. Scott, commander, Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. While Apollo 15 astronauts Scott and Irwin will descend in the lunar module to explore the moon's Hadley-Apennine region, astronaut Worden will remain in lunar orbit with the command module. For more information, visit http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/history/apollo/apollo-15/apollo-15.htm Photo credit: NASA KSC-71PC-0685

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 15's Saturn V rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 9:34 a.m., EDT, July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Aboard the Apollo 15 spacecraft are astronauts David R. Scott, commander, Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot.      While Apollo 15 astronauts Scott and Irwin will descend in the lunar module to explore the moon's Hadley-Apennine region, astronaut Worden will remain in lunar orbit with the command module. For more information, visit   http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/history/apollo/apollo-15/apollo-15.htm Photo credit: NASA KSC-71PC-0685

Apollo 17 Night Launch

Apollo 17 Night Launch

Launch of Pioneer 10 to Jupiter occured at 8:49 p.m. EST March 2, 1972 ARC-1972-AC72-2142

Launch of Pioneer 10 to Jupiter occured at 8:49 p.m. EST  March 2, 1972 ARC-1972-AC72-2142

Apollo 16 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 16 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 16 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 16 - Saturn Apollo Program

Launch of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

Launch of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

Launch of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

Launch of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Launch of unmanned Skylab 1 space vehicle

Launch of unmanned Skylab 1 space vehicle

Launch of unmanned Skylab 1 space vehicle

Launch of unmanned Skylab 1 space vehicle

Skylab

Skylab

Launch Vehicles

Launch Vehicles

Mars Mission: Viking I on Titan III Centaur Rocket Launch

Mars Mission: Viking I on Titan III Centaur Rocket Launch

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Apollo Soyuz Test Project Saturn IB launch vehicle thundered away from KSC’s Launch Complex 39B at 3:50 p.m. today. Aboard the Apollo Command Module were ASTP Astronauts Thomas Stafford, Vance Brand and Donald Slayton. The astronauts will rendezvous and dock with a Soyuz spacecraft, launched this morning from the Baikonur launch facility in the Soviet Union, carrying Soviet cosmonauts Aleksey Leonov and Valeriy Kubasov. The first international crewed spaceflight was a joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. rendezvous and docking mission. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, or ASTP, took its name from the spacecraft employed: the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz. The three-man Apollo crew lifted off from Kennedy Space Center aboard a Saturn IB rocket on July 15, 1975, to link up with the Soyuz that had launched a few hours earlier. A cylindrical docking module served as an airlock between the two spacecraft for transfer of the crew members. Photo credit: NASA KSC-108-75PC-0388

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Apollo Soyuz Test Project Saturn IB launch vehicle thundered away from KSC’s Launch Complex 39B at 3:50 p.m. today.  Aboard the Apollo Command Module were ASTP Astronauts Thomas Stafford, Vance Brand and Donald Slayton.  The astronauts will rendezvous and dock with a Soyuz spacecraft, launched this morning from the Baikonur launch facility in the Soviet Union, carrying Soviet cosmonauts Aleksey Leonov and Valeriy Kubasov.      The first international crewed spaceflight was a joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. rendezvous and docking mission.  The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, or ASTP, took its name from the spacecraft employed: the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz.  The three-man Apollo crew lifted off from Kennedy Space Center aboard a Saturn IB rocket on July 15, 1975, to link up with the Soyuz that had launched a few hours earlier.  A cylindrical docking module served as an airlock between the two spacecraft for transfer of the crew members.  Photo credit: NASA KSC-108-75PC-0388

Launch of the Apollo spacecraft to begin ASTP mission

Launch of the Apollo spacecraft to begin ASTP mission

Launch Vehicles

Launch Vehicles

Voyager 2 Launch

Voyager 2 Launch

ATLAS F SEASAT A LIFTOFF

ATLAS F SEASAT A LIFTOFF

Launch Vehicles

Launch Vehicles