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Cygnus loop nebula space dust, science technology.

Cygnus loop nebula space dust, science technology.

Small pot with remnants of green glaze

Small pot with remnants of green glaze

Last Remnants of the American Bison, Yellowstone National Park, U. S. A.

Last Remnants of the American Bison, Yellowstone National Park, U. S. A.

Last Remnants of the American Bison, Yellowstone National Park, U. S. A.

Last Remnants of the American Bison, Yellowstone National Park, U. S. A.

[Cartoon relating to Republican defeat of Tammany Hall candidates in 1875 elections: "Tammany's Waterloo" trumpeting elephant standing on crushed remnants of "Reformed Tammany Hall"] / Th. Nast.

[Cartoon relating to Republican defeat of Tammany Hall candidates in 1875 elections: "Tammany's Waterloo" trumpeting elephant standing on crushed remnants of "Reformed Tammany Hall"] / Th. Nast.

[Remnants store, Berlin, Germany]

[Remnants store, Berlin, Germany]

Last remnants of the American Bison, Y[ellowstone] Nat[ional] Park, U.S.A.

Last remnants of the American Bison, Y[ellowstone] Nat[ional] Park, U.S.A.

The remnants of the Serbian Armies at Tchakor = Les restants des Armées Serbes à Tchakor

The remnants of the Serbian Armies at Tchakor = Les restants des Armées Serbes à Tchakor

Ceremonies - War Activities - NYACK, N.Y. Remnants of the G.A.R. leading the Home Guard in escorting the men of the first draft's second quota on the way to entrain for Camp Dix, N.J

Ceremonies - War Activities - NYACK, N.Y. Remnants of the G.A.R. leading the Home Guard in escorting the men of the first draft's second quota on the way to entrain for Camp Dix, N.J

The remnants of an army, Serbia, 1915 Les ombres de l'armée, Serbe, 1915.

The remnants of an army, Serbia, 1915 Les ombres de l'armée, Serbe, 1915.

Trucks like these bring the last remnants of the small ranchers' herds to the stockyards. Billings, Montana

Trucks like these bring the last remnants of the small ranchers' herds to the stockyards. Billings, Montana

Remnants of the old iron center furnace of Hickman County on the Coalins Forest and Game Reservation. Kentucky

Remnants of the old iron center furnace of Hickman County on the Coalins Forest and Game Reservation. Kentucky

Wood shavings and piling. Remnants of logging operations at Winton, Minnesota

Wood shavings and piling. Remnants of logging operations at Winton, Minnesota

Remnants of building deposited by 1937 flood in New Madrid Bird's Point Fuse Plug Levee District

Remnants of building deposited by 1937 flood in New Madrid Bird's Point Fuse Plug Levee District

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

New Madrid County, Missouri. Remnants of building deposited by flood

New Madrid County, Missouri. Remnants of building deposited by flood

Judge James B. Park with remnants of the old Parks Mill, Georgia

Judge James B. Park with remnants of the old Parks Mill, Georgia

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

Rags. Collection and processing. A portion of the sorting room in a large Eastern rag processing plant. In this room new rag remnants, consisting chiefly of cuttings received from clothing factories, are sorted. The rags are classified and separated according to the type of cloth; colored rags are graded according to the ease with which they can be bleached. The baskets in back of the women are filled with rags that have been sorted and classified. The women work in teams of two; it takes a team about two hours to sort the rags in one full bale. In another part of the plant, a room of the same size and general appearance as this is used for sorting used rags. Shapiro Company, Baltimore, Maryland

Rags. Collection and processing. A portion of the sorting room in a large Eastern rag processing plant. In this room new rag remnants, consisting chiefly of cuttings received from clothing factories, are sorted. The rags are classified and separated according to the type of cloth; colored rags are graded according to the ease with which they can be bleached. The baskets in back of the women are filled with rags that have been sorted and classified. The women work in teams of two; it takes a team about two hours to sort the rags in one full bale. In another part of the plant, a room of the same size and general appearance as this is used for sorting used rags. Shapiro Company, Baltimore, Maryland

P-21761 C Range: 313,000 kilometers (194,000 miles) This color reconstruction of part of the northern hemisphere of Ganymede shows a scene approximately 1,300 kilometers (806 miles) across. It shows part of dark, densely cratered block which is bound on the south by lighter, and less cratered grooved terrain. The dark blocks are believed to be the oldest parts of Ganymede's surface. Numerous craters are visible, many with central peaks. The large bright circular features have little relief and are probably the remnants of old, large craters that have been annealed by flow of the icy near-surface material. The closely-spaced arcuate, linear features are probably analogous to similiar features on Ganymede which surround a large impact basin. The linear features here may indicate the former presence of a large impact basin to the southwest. ARC-1979-AC79-7089

P-21761 C Range: 313,000 kilometers (194,000 miles) This color reconstruction of part of the northern hemisphere of Ganymede shows a scene approximately 1,300 kilometers (806 miles) across. It shows part of dark, densely cratered block which is bound on the south by lighter, and less cratered grooved terrain. The dark blocks are believed to be the oldest parts of Ganymede's surface. Numerous craters are visible, many with central peaks. The large bright circular features have little relief and are probably the remnants of old, large craters that have been annealed by flow of the icy near-surface material. The closely-spaced arcuate, linear features are probably analogous to similiar features on Ganymede which surround a large impact basin. The linear features here may indicate the former presence of a large impact basin to the southwest. ARC-1979-AC79-7089

This color reconstruction of part of the northern hemisphere of Ganymede was made from pictures taken at a range of 313,000 km (194,000 mi.). The scene is approx. 1,300 km (806 mi.) across. It shows part of dark, densely cratered block which is bound on the south by lighter, and less cratered, grooved terrain. The dark blocks are believed to be the oldest parts of Ganymede's surface. Numerous craters are visible, many with central peaks. The large bright circular features have little relief and are probably the remnants of old, large craters that have been annealed by flow of the icy near-surface material. The closely-spaced arcuate, linear features are probably analogous to similar features on Ganymede which surround a large impact basin. The linear features here may indicate the former presence of a large impact basin to the southwest. ARC-1979-A79-7089

This color reconstruction of part of the northern hemisphere of Ganymede was made from pictures taken at a range of 313,000 km (194,000 mi.).  The scene is approx. 1,300 km (806 mi.) across.  It shows part of dark, densely cratered block which is bound on the south by lighter, and less cratered, grooved terrain.  The dark blocks are believed to be the oldest parts of Ganymede's surface.  Numerous craters are visible, many with central peaks.  The large bright circular features have little relief and are probably the remnants of old, large craters that have been annealed by flow of the icy near-surface material.  The closely-spaced arcuate, linear features are probably analogous to similar features on Ganymede which surround a large impact basin.  The linear features here may indicate the former presence of a large impact basin to the southwest. ARC-1979-A79-7089

Remnants of the springs, site of the original settlers, Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of the springs, site of the original settlers, Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of famous signs at the "Neon Boneyard" in Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of famous signs at the "Neon Boneyard" in Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of the springs that rose from aquifers in the blistering Mojave Desert, at Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Park, Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of the springs that rose from aquifers in the blistering Mojave Desert, at Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Park, Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of famous signs at the "Neon Boneyard" in Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of famous signs at the "Neon Boneyard" in Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of famous signs at the "Neon Boneyard" in Las Vegas, Nevada

Remnants of famous signs at the "Neon Boneyard" in Las Vegas, Nevada

The picked over remnants of an F-111 aircraft lie on the desert floor in the late afternoon sun at the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center. More that 2,500 aircraft from all services are stored at the center, only a small percentage of which are

The picked over remnants of an F-111 aircraft lie on the desert floor in the late afternoon sun at the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center. More that 2,500 aircraft from all services are stored at the center, only a small percentage of which are

A Soviet inspector stands beside the mangled remnants of two Pershing II missile stages. Several missiles are being destroyed in the presence of Soviet inspectors in accordance with the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty

A Soviet inspector stands beside the mangled remnants of two Pershing II missile stages. Several missiles are being destroyed in the presence of Soviet inspectors in accordance with the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty

P-34578 BW One of two new ring arcs, or partial rings, discovered by Voyager 2, is faintly visible just outside the orbit of the Neptunian moon 1989N4.The 155-second exposure taken by the spacecraft's narrow-angle camera shows the glare of an overexposed Neptune to the right of the moon and ring arc. The two bright streaks below the moon and ring arc are stars. The ring arc is approximately 50,000 kilometers (30,000 miles) long. The second ring arc, not apparent here, is about 10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles) long and is assoiciated with moon 1989N3. The ring arc, along with 1989N4, orbits about 62,000 kilometers (38,000 miles) from the planet's cloud tops. Astronomers long suspected the existence of such an irregular ring system around Neptune. Data from repeated ground-based observations hinted at the existence of irregular strands of partial rings orbiting Neptune. Voyager's photographs of the ring arcs are the first photographic evidence that such a ring system exists. Voyager scientists said the ring arcs may be comprised of debris associated with the nearby moons, or may be the remnants of moons that have been torn apart or ground down through collisions. Close-up studies of the ring arcs by Voyager 2 will help determine their composition. ARC-1989-A89-7042

P-34578 BW One of two new ring arcs, or partial rings, discovered by Voyager 2, is faintly visible just outside the orbit of the Neptunian moon 1989N4.The 155-second exposure taken by the spacecraft's narrow-angle camera shows the glare of an overexposed Neptune to the right of the moon and ring arc. The two bright streaks below the moon and ring arc are stars. The ring arc is approximately 50,000 kilometers (30,000 miles) long. The second ring arc, not apparent here, is about 10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles) long and is assoiciated with moon 1989N3. The ring arc, along with 1989N4, orbits about 62,000 kilometers (38,000 miles) from the planet's cloud tops. Astronomers long suspected the existence of such an irregular ring system around Neptune. Data from repeated ground-based observations hinted at the existence of irregular strands of partial rings orbiting Neptune. Voyager's photographs of the ring arcs are the first photographic evidence that such a ring system exists. Voyager scientists said the ring arcs may be comprised of debris associated with the nearby moons, or may be the remnants of moons that have been torn apart or ground down through collisions. Close-up studies of the ring arcs by Voyager 2 will help determine their composition. ARC-1989-A89-7042

This photomosaic of Triton, assembled from 14 individual frames, shows the great variety of its surface features. At the bottom of the image are remnants of the south polar cap, containing 'dark' streaks generally aligned towards the northeast (upper right in the image). Even though these are darker than other features on Triton, they reflect nearly ten times as much light as the surface of the Earth's moon. North of the cap, in the western (left) half of the disk is the region which has been informally dubbed the 'cantaloupe' terrain. Small dimples with upraised rims and shallow central depressions dot the area. Long fractures have opened allowing some icy material to ooze up and form a central ridge. These criss-cross the region and extend into parts of the polar cap region. Towards the south this terrain has a light covering of frost. Running east to the limb of Triton, just north of the polar cap, is an area of smooth plains and low hills which is the most densely cratered region seen. In the northeast (upper right) of this image are plains which show evidence for extensive resurfacing, including possible extrusions of flowing material onto the surface. This region also contains two large smooth areas reminiscent of the maria of the Earth's moon which were formed by large-scale volcanic flooding. Near the eastern (right) limb of Triton are three darker gray markings with sharply defined brighter borders. These are unlike anything else seen in the solar system, and their origin is not yet understood. ARC-1989-A89-7061

This photomosaic of Triton, assembled from 14 individual frames, shows the great variety of its surface features.  At the bottom of the image are remnants of the south polar cap, containing 'dark'  streaks generally aligned towards the northeast (upper right in the image).  Even though these are darker than other features on Triton, they reflect nearly ten times as much light as the surface of the Earth's moon.  North of the cap, in the western (left) half of the disk is the region which has been informally dubbed the 'cantaloupe' terrain.  Small dimples with upraised rims and shallow central depressions dot the area.  Long fractures have opened allowing some icy material to ooze up and form a central ridge.  These criss-cross the region and extend into parts of the polar cap region.  Towards the south this terrain has a light covering of frost.  Running east to the limb of Triton, just north of the polar cap, is an area of smooth plains and low hills which is the most densely cratered region seen.  In the northeast (upper right) of this image are plains which show evidence for extensive resurfacing, including possible extrusions of flowing material onto the surface.  This region also contains two large smooth areas reminiscent of the maria of the Earth's moon which were formed by large-scale volcanic flooding.  Near the eastern (right) limb of Triton are three darker gray markings with sharply defined brighter borders.  These are unlike anything else seen in the solar system, and their origin is not yet understood. ARC-1989-A89-7061

An aerial view of the remnants of an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135E Stratotanker aircraft that exploded and burned while taxiing to a parking area. Two of the aircraft's seven crewmen were killed; the others sustained only minor injuries

An aerial view of the remnants of an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135E Stratotanker aircraft that exploded and burned while taxiing to a parking area. Two of the aircraft's seven crewmen were killed; the others sustained only minor injuries

Crash crewmen spray a foam/water agent on the remnants of an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135E Stratotanker aircraft that exploded and burned while taxiing to a parking area. Two of the aircraft's seven crewmen were killed; the others sustained only minor injuries

Crash crewmen spray a foam/water agent on the remnants of an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135E Stratotanker aircraft that exploded and burned while taxiing to a parking area. Two of the aircraft's seven crewmen were killed; the others sustained only minor injuries

Crash crewmen aboard a P-15 aircraft firefighting and rescue truck spray a foam/water agent on the remnants of an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135E Stratotanker aircraft that exploded and burned while taxiing to a parking area. Two of the aircraft's seven crewmen were killed; the others sustained only minor injuries

Crash crewmen aboard a P-15 aircraft firefighting and rescue truck spray a foam/water agent on the remnants of an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135E Stratotanker aircraft that exploded and burned while taxiing to a parking area. Two of the aircraft's seven crewmen were killed; the others sustained only minor injuries

The aircraft carrier USS RANGER (CV-61) passes the remnants of a coastal fort on an island now used as a communications monitoring point. The RANGER is visiting Japan for the last time while on its final deployment prior to decommissioning

The aircraft carrier USS RANGER (CV-61) passes the remnants of a coastal fort on an island now used as a communications monitoring point. The RANGER is visiting Japan for the last time while on its final deployment prior to decommissioning

Military Photographer of the Year Winner 1996 Title: Bloody Fields Category: Portfolio Brief Description: A panel of five pictures depicting the remnants of war deaths. (black & white ) Exact Date Shot Unknown

Military Photographer of the Year Winner 1996 Title: Bloody Fields Category: Portfolio Brief Description: A panel of five pictures depicting the remnants of war deaths. (black & white ) Exact Date Shot Unknown

Venus - Possible Remnants of a Meteoroid in Lakshmi Region

Venus - Possible Remnants of a Meteoroid in Lakshmi Region

Church of Saint Nicholas Mokryi (1665-72), interior, view east with remnants of icon screen and frescoes (1672), Yaroslavl', Russia

Church of Saint Nicholas Mokryi (1665-72), interior, view east with remnants of icon screen and frescoes (1672), Yaroslavl', Russia

As the flood waters of the Red River recedes, remnants of residents' belongings start to reappear. The Red River rose to slightly over 54 feet in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and East Grand Forks, Minnesota, leaving many people homeless for many days. (Substandard image)

As the flood waters of the Red River recedes, remnants of residents' belongings start to reappear. The Red River rose to slightly over 54 feet in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and East Grand Forks, Minnesota, leaving many people homeless for many days. (Substandard image)

Remnants of the flood in Grand Forks can still be seen while the Red River recedes. The Red River crested at 54 feet, the highest in the history of Grand Forks, North Dakota

Remnants of the flood in Grand Forks can still be seen while the Red River recedes. The Red River crested at 54 feet, the highest in the history of Grand Forks, North Dakota

A-10 recovery team members hike through the basin in search of any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

A-10 recovery team members hike through the basin in search of any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team board a CH-47 helicopter after completing a search of the basin and East Brush Creek areas for remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Members of the A-10 recovery team board a CH-47 helicopter after completing a search of the basin and East Brush Creek areas for remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

The feet and helmet of one of the A-10 recovery team members is seen resting after a long hard day of searching for remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

The feet and helmet of one of the A-10 recovery team members is seen resting after a long hard day of searching for remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Pararescueman SSGT Richard Barnes ascends to a ridgeline, followed by another member of the A-10 recovery team, during his search for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Pararescueman SSGT Richard Barnes ascends to a ridgeline, followed by another member of the A-10 recovery team, during his search for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team descend one of the many unstable rock piles as they search along the East Brush Creek for remnants of the A-10 or the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs. An Army UH-1N helicopter can be seen flying near one of the peaks

Members of the A-10 recovery team descend one of the many unstable rock piles as they search along the East Brush Creek for remnants of the A-10 or the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs. An Army UH-1N helicopter can be seen flying near one of the peaks

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Explosive Ordnance Disposal members SRA Kelly Roy (left) and SRA Ferdinand Smith (right) search the ponds with their MK-26 Ferrous Ordnance Locators for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Explosive Ordnance Disposal members SRA Kelly Roy (left) and SRA Ferdinand Smith (right) search the ponds with their MK-26 Ferrous Ordnance Locators for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search along East Brush Creek for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Members of the A-10 recovery team search for any remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Pararescueman SRA Paul Simpson takes a minute to appreciate the beauty of the countryside as he and other members of the A-10 recovery team search along the East Brush Creek for remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Pararescueman SRA Paul Simpson takes a minute to appreciate the beauty of the countryside as he and other members of the A-10 recovery team search along the East Brush Creek for remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Explosive Ordnance Disposal member SSGT James Rutske descends from one of the many rock faces using a rescue line for safety as pararescueman MSGT Rick Weaver assists from above. Both are members of the A-10 recovery team searching along the East Brush Creek for remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Explosive Ordnance Disposal member SSGT James Rutske descends from one of the many rock faces using a rescue line for safety as pararescueman MSGT Rick Weaver assists from above. Both are members of the A-10 recovery team searching along the East Brush Creek for remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Two members of the A-10 recovery team carefully move into position on the snow covered slopes along the opposite rim of Gold Dust Peak to begin their search for remnants of the aircraft

Two members of the A-10 recovery team carefully move into position on the snow covered slopes along the opposite rim of Gold Dust Peak to begin their search for remnants of the aircraft

A-10 recovery team members search for remnants of the aircraft on the snow covered slopes as well as the shifting rock piles caused by recent rains

A-10 recovery team members search for remnants of the aircraft on the snow covered slopes as well as the shifting rock piles caused by recent rains

MSGT Eric Wass, Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, takes a well deserved break during the ground search of the lakes around Gold Dust Peak for remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass, Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, takes a well deserved break during the ground search of the lakes around Gold Dust Peak for remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass (left), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, gets a location fix with his portable global positioning system as SRA Scott McCullough (background) surveys the area in an attempt to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass (left), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, gets a location fix with his portable global positioning system as SRA Scott McCullough (background) surveys the area in an attempt to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass (right), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, gets a location fix with his portable global positioning system (GPS) as another member of the A-10 recovery team takes a short break. The diverse terrain and thick tree cover has made getting a satellite fix with the GPS difficult in their efforts to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass (right), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, gets a location fix with his portable global positioning system (GPS) as another member of the A-10 recovery team takes a short break. The diverse terrain and thick tree cover has made getting a satellite fix with the GPS difficult in their efforts to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A CH-47 helicopter assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard lands along East Brush Creek to pick up A-10 recovery team members after searching for remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Creek and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A CH-47 helicopter assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard lands along East Brush Creek to pick up A-10 recovery team members after searching for remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Creek and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A CH-47 helicopter assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard lands along East Brush Creek to pick up A-10 recovery team members after searching for remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Creek and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A CH-47 helicopter assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard lands along East Brush Creek to pick up A-10 recovery team members after searching for remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Creek and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A pararescueman confirms the areas searched in Negro Basin along EAst Brush Creek in attempt to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A pararescueman confirms the areas searched in Negro Basin along EAst Brush Creek in attempt to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

SRA Jamie Periz (left), MSGT Rick Weaver (center), SSGT Michael Rago (far right), and other members of the A-10 recovery team walk back to their base of operations after a day of searching for remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

SRA Jamie Periz (left), MSGT Rick Weaver (center), SSGT Michael Rago (far right), and other members of the A-10 recovery team walk back to their base of operations after a day of searching for remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Army SGT Bosmans, a CH-47 flight engineer assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, watches as A-10 recovery team members aboard the helicopter to begin another day of searching for remnants of the aircraft that crashed near Gold Dust Peak

Army SGT Bosmans, a CH-47 flight engineer assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, watches as A-10 recovery team members aboard the helicopter to begin another day of searching for remnants of the aircraft that crashed near Gold Dust Peak

MSGT Eric Wass (right), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, confirms the areas searched with pararescuemen SSGT John Horton (center) and SSGT Jimmy Petrolia (right). These and other members of the A-10 recovery team are attempting to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass (right), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, confirms the areas searched with pararescuemen SSGT John Horton (center) and SSGT Jimmy Petrolia (right). These and other members of the A-10 recovery team are attempting to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A-10 recovery team members approach the rear of the CH-47 for their ride home after searching all day for remnants of the A-10 that crashed near Gold Dust Peak and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs. The helicopter is assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard

A-10 recovery team members approach the rear of the CH-47 for their ride home after searching all day for remnants of the A-10 that crashed near Gold Dust Peak and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs. The helicopter is assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard

MSGT Eric Wass (left), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, gets a location fix with his portable global positioning system as SRA Scott McCullough (background) surveys the area in an attempt to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

MSGT Eric Wass (left), an Explosive Ordnance Disposal member, gets a location fix with his portable global positioning system as SRA Scott McCullough (background) surveys the area in an attempt to locate any remnants of the A-10 and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Members of the A-10 recovery team confirm the areas searched along East Brush Creek in their attempts to locate any remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Creek and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

Members of the A-10 recovery team confirm the areas searched along East Brush Creek in their attempts to locate any remnants of the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Creek and the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs

A CH-47 from Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, drops off the Navy's Zodiac boat. The Navy's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California will search the lake, one of six near the crash site, for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

A CH-47 from Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, drops off the Navy's Zodiac boat. The Navy's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California will search the lake, one of six near the crash site, for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

A CH-47 from Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, starts its approach over New York Lake to drop off the Navy's Zodiac boat. The Navy's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California will search the lake, one of six near the crash site, for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

A CH-47 from Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, starts its approach over New York Lake to drop off the Navy's Zodiac boat. The Navy's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California will search the lake, one of six near the crash site, for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnanceman CHIEF George Wilson (left) and Storekeeper First Class Alan Beaty (right) load their outboard motor into the Zodiac boat on New York Lake where the Navy's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California will search for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed near Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnanceman CHIEF George Wilson (left) and Storekeeper First Class Alan Beaty (right) load their outboard motor into the Zodiac boat on New York Lake where the Navy's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California will search for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed near Gold Dust Peak

Engineman CHIEF Jeffry Carruth (left) and Boatswain Mate Second Class Melvis Selerino (right), both from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California, prepare their Zodiac boat for the initial search operations for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed near Gold Dust Peak

Engineman CHIEF Jeffry Carruth (left) and Boatswain Mate Second Class Melvis Selerino (right), both from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California, prepare their Zodiac boat for the initial search operations for remnants of the four 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed near Gold Dust Peak

A member of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego searches a pond west of New York Lake for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

A member of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego searches a pond west of New York Lake for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson (lower left) watch as Naval Explosive Ordnance Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (foreground) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes, using face mask and snorkel, search in one of the ponds west of New York Lake for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson (lower left) watch as Naval Explosive Ordnance Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (foreground) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes, using face mask and snorkel, search in one of the ponds west of New York Lake for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technician Signalman First Class Joel Blea (center) gets some assistance suiting up from Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson as Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes looks on. Blea and Hakes prepare to search the ponds west of New York Lake for any remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technician Signalman First Class Joel Blea (center) gets some assistance suiting up from Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson as Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes looks on. Blea and Hakes prepare to search the ponds west of New York Lake for any remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technician Signalman First Class Joel Blea surfaces with a vintage "Squirt" bottle found while searching for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technician Signalman First Class Joel Blea surfaces with a vintage "Squirt" bottle found while searching for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (foreground) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes prepare to swim in one of the ponds west of New York Lake in search of remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (foreground) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes prepare to swim in one of the ponds west of New York Lake in search of remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson (lower left) and another Navy member (in background) assist as Naval Explosive Ordnance technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (foreground) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes, using face mask and snorkel, swim in one of the ponds west of New York Lake in search of remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson (lower left) and another Navy member (in background) assist as Naval Explosive Ordnance technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (foreground) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes, using face mask and snorkel, swim in one of the ponds west of New York Lake in search of remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Ordnance DIsposal Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (left) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes (right) suit up in preparation for a swim in ponds west of New York Lake as they search for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Naval Explosive Ordnance DIsposal Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea (left) and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes (right) suit up in preparation for a swim in ponds west of New York Lake as they search for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson (center, background) watch as Naval Explosive Ordnance Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes, using face mask and snorkel, search in one of the ponds west of New York Lake for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

Aviation Ordnance CHIEF George Wilson (center, background) watch as Naval Explosive Ordnance Mobile Unit 7 technicians Signalman First Class Joel Blea and Quartermaster Second Class Gary Hakes, using face mask and snorkel, search in one of the ponds west of New York Lake for remnants of four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak

A diver's knife is strapped onto Engineman SENIOR CHIEF Charles Payne's leg as he prepares to search the lake for remnants of the 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak. Payne is a member of the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California

A diver's knife is strapped onto Engineman SENIOR CHIEF Charles Payne's leg as he prepares to search the lake for remnants of the 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak. Payne is a member of the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California

Members of the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California arrive by CH-47 helicopter (in the background) to search the last of six lakes for remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak. The helicopter is assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard

Members of the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California arrive by CH-47 helicopter (in the background) to search the last of six lakes for remnants of the four 500 pound Mark 82 bombs that were carried by the A-10 that crashed on nearby Gold Dust Peak. The helicopter is assigned to Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard

A flight engineer (left) on the Ch-47 helicopter from Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, monitors a Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technician from San Diego, California, as he prepares to attach a hoist cable to the Zodiac boat. The boat and members of Mobile Unit 7 completed a search of one of the lakes near Gold Dust Peak for remnants of the 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed nearby

A flight engineer (left) on the Ch-47 helicopter from Detachment 1, Company G, 140th Aviation, Nevada Army National Guard, monitors a Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 technician from San Diego, California, as he prepares to attach a hoist cable to the Zodiac boat. The boat and members of Mobile Unit 7 completed a search of one of the lakes near Gold Dust Peak for remnants of the 500 pound bombs carried by the A-10 that crashed nearby

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Casey McClellan (right), with Lockheed Martin, and an unidentified worker look over the spacecraft Stardust before a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0095

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Casey McClellan (right), with Lockheed Martin, and an unidentified worker look over the spacecraft Stardust before a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0095

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the spacecraft Stardust is on display for a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0094

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the spacecraft Stardust is on display for a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0094

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, media representatives, dressed in protective suits, are updated by Project Manager Richard Grammier (center, top), with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, about the Stardust spacecraft (in the background). Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0096

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, media representatives, dressed in protective suits, are updated by Project Manager Richard Grammier (center, top), with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, about the Stardust spacecraft (in the background). Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0096

The cover is removed from the Stardust spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility prior to a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0093

The cover is removed from the Stardust spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility prior to a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0093

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Casey McClellan (left) and Denise Kato (right), with Lockheed Martin, prepare the spacecraft Stardust for a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0097

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Casey McClellan (left) and Denise Kato (right), with Lockheed Martin, prepare the spacecraft Stardust for a media presentation. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule (the white-topped, blunt-nosed cone seen on the top of the spacecraft) to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0097

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker holds the video camera to be mounted on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. His co-worker (right) makes equipment adjustments. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0117

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker holds the video camera to be mounted on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. His co-worker (right) makes equipment adjustments. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0117

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the mating of the spacecraft Stardust (above) with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket (below). Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0102

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the mating of the spacecraft Stardust (above) with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket (below). Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0102

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker (left) runs a wire through a mounting hole on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket in order to affix an external video camera held by the worker at right. The Delta II will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0116

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker (left) runs a wire through a mounting hole on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket in order to affix an external video camera held by the worker at right. The Delta II will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0116

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers check the mounting on a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0119

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers check the mounting on a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0119

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the overhead crane lifting the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust is being moved in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0100

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the overhead crane lifting the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust is being moved in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0100

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers finish mounting a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0118

At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers finish mounting a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0118

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the spacecraft Stardust being lowered in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0101

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the spacecraft Stardust being lowered in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0101

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the final adjustments on the protective canister enclosing the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust will be moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0123

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the final adjustments on the protective canister enclosing the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust will be moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0123

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers guide a protective canister as it is lowered over the Stardust spacecraft. Once it is enclosed, Stardust will be moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0122

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers guide a protective canister as it is lowered over the Stardust spacecraft. Once it is enclosed, Stardust will be moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0122

Completely enclosed in a protective canister, the spacecraft Stardust is moved by a crane toward a transporter in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. Stardust is being moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0124

Completely enclosed in a protective canister, the spacecraft Stardust is moved by a crane toward a transporter in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. Stardust is being moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0124

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility keep watch as an overhead crane lowers the Stardust spacecraft, enclosed in a protective canister, onto a transporter. Stardust is being moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0125

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility keep watch as an overhead crane lowers the Stardust spacecraft, enclosed in a protective canister, onto a transporter. Stardust is being moved to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. The spacecraft is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0125

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Stardust spacecraft waits to be encased in a protective canister for its move to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0120

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Stardust spacecraft waits to be encased in a protective canister for its move to Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for launch preparations. Stardust is targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-99pc0120