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[Folding bridge - two views, top extended across moat, bottom folded prior to release; used by infantry during assault on fortress]

Know all men by these presents that I for and in consideration of the sum of current money of the Province of .... have granted, bargained, sold, released; and by these present do fully, clearly and absolutely grant, bargain, sell and release un

Release of the Brienne Estate from John Harvey to Sir George Amyand Baronet

Release of the Brienne Estate from John Harvey to Sir George Amyand Baronet

State of New-Hampshire. In the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and eighty one. An Act for impowering the sheriff of the County of Cheshire to release from prison sundry of the good subjects of this State, imprisoned by certain evil-

The Release of Prometheus

Release document for Laurence Detune

William H. Ludlow to Abraham Lincoln, Saturday, September 14, 1861 (Telegram regarding release of prisoner at Ft. Lafayette)

Francis P. Blair Jr. to Montgomery Blair, Thursday, October 03, 1861 (Release from prison)

Thomas H. Hicks to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, May 30, 1862 (Release of suspected conspirators)

Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Sylvester R. Knight, [January 1862] (Release of Mrs. Knight's husband)

Samuel S. Cox to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, December 05, 1862 (Release of political prisoner)

W. A. Winder to Montgomery Blair, Friday, August 07, 1863 (Telegram requesting release on Captain Winder)

M. E. Smithson to Murtaugh, September 1863 (Seeks release of her husband)

[James Mitchell] to John P. Usher, Thursday, November 05, 1863 (Draft of order to release funds to African Civilization Society)

John H. Waring to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, February 15, 1864 (Appreciates release from prison)

Erastus H. Boyd to Sempronius H. Boyd, Wednesday, November 30, 1864 (Seeks release from prison)

Union soldiers as they appeared on their release from the rebel prisons / from photographs made by order of Congress.

Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, Monday, August 22, 1864 (Release of Joseph Howard Jr.; endorsed by Stanton and Lincoln)

Abraham Lincoln to Friends of Union and Liberty, Monday, May 09, 1864 (Press release announcing success of Grant's army)

Andrew Johnson to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, April 12, 1865 (Release of prisoners; endorsed by Lincoln, April 14, 1865)

Joseph W. McClurg to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, February 02, 1865 (Release of prisoners)

W. H. H. Cardiff and Henry Elliot to Joseph W. McClurg, Wednesday, February 01, 1865 (Telegram concerning release of rebel prisoners)

H. H. Harman to Thomas W. Harman, Monday, January 23, 1865 (Seeks release from prison)

Albin Schoepf to Thomas W. Harman, Friday, January 27, 1865 (Release of Harman's brother)

The prisoner's release. W. R. Smith, Agt. ... Johnson, Song Publisher, 7 North Tenth St., Philad'a

What a trifle may embroil nations! British lion to American eagle, "In the name of Queen Victoria, the royal family, and over a million of children, I demand his release." / Th. Nast.

Uncle Sam - Guess there's enough here to secure Hobson's release

Release all class prisoners … General Defense Committee … Chicago, Ill. … Wm. D. Haywood. [1906-07?].

Suffragettes procession after release from prison

Albert T. Patrick immediately after release

Overman lifeboat release

PRESS CORRESPONDENTS. GOVERNMENT RELEASE TO PRESS

PRESS CORRESPONDENTS. GOVERNMENT RELEASE TO PRESS

American Library Association - Miscellaneous - From Ford Weekly, "Your Job Back Home", Goldwyn Release. April and May 1919. Film made at Detroit Public Library directed by Marian Humble

Publicity release about iron bound box test, 1917

Kate Heffelfinger after her release from Occoquan Prison, ca. 1917.

Peace. "The peace of the great release," Henley's "Rhymes & Rhythms", Derry & Toms / F.H. Warren.

[Mrs.] Lawrence Lewis [Dora Lewis] of Philadelphia on release from jail after five [d]ays of hunger striking.

[Picketers with signs: Soldiers who fought in the World War demand the release of political prisoners ..., etc.]

Group of WWI veterans at White House to appeal to the Pres. for release of fed. prisoners convicted of opposing the war - D. Loman, John J. Kelley, N.M. Holderman, Geo. H. Mallon, Clayton K. Stack, and Sam. Dreset

Photograph taken at the White House of the group of children who have come to Wash. to appeal to the President for the release of political prisoners

[Balloon release from White House with tickets attached for the Wash.-St. Louis game, for the benefit of the Boys Club, 230 C St., N.W.]

[Frank Farnum - probably not the Western star Frank Farnum - coaching Pauline Starke to do the Charleston for the movie "A Little Bit of Broadway" (release title "Bright Eyes"). May 9, 1925]

"Supporting a bride" latest Dempsey release

Photograph of Release Cutting in Spruce and Balsam

Electrical door locking and operating device, Figure 3: Emergency mechanical release.

To the movies. Polish Ambassador Stanislaw Patek, accompanied by his personal secretary, attends a Washington motion picture theatre to see the March of Time, a new motion picture release. 2/2/35

Chinese Minister's family attend theatre. The March of Time, a motion picture release, attracted representatives of foreign governments when it was shown in Washington. This group, from the left, Madame Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, wife of the minister, and their two daughters, Julia and Alce. The young gentleman is Wilber Sze, nephew of the minister. 2/1/35

U.S. Reports: Meadows v. Irving Trust Co., 299 U.S. 464 (1937)

Editing an information release. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Washington, D.C.

Sir Harold MacMichael. H.E. [i.e., His Excellency] in Beersheba. June 1938. Tribal court forum[?] attended by H.E. [i.e., His Excellency] while Sheikh Atawineh submitted a petition for the release of those exiled, etc.

Little business man what now? Washington, D.C., March 4. President Roosevelt's recent Little Business Men's Conference will come in for a bit of good-natured jibing at the Women's National Press Club Annual Dinner and Stunt Party at the Willard Hotel, Saturday, March 5. The ladies of the Administration, headed by Mrs. Roosevelt, will be honored guests at the party. Mrs. Fletcher Howarth will impersonate Secretary Roper and the Little Business Men in the skit "nice work if you can get it" to be staged at the affair, 3/4/38 Note: this photograph is for release to morning papers of Sunday, March 6, 1938

Bombs away! At the proper moment the bombardiers release their load. A salvo, such as this, finds all bombs dropping in a straight line, because each of them continues, for a time, at the same forward speed it had acquired while in the plane's bomb bay. Three miles down below is the target, the objective of this raid. After this salvo, the bombardier may direct the pilot to fly back over the target for another crack at it

Press Release No. 159, "Library of Congress Announces the Opening of Two New Exhibitions Related to the War," Library of Congress, October 7, 1940

Press Release No. 30, "Democracy Alcove," Library of Congress, September 10, 1941

Civilian defense. A police emergency worker shows how Warsop asoline rockbreaker works. The two-cycled engine delivers 2300 blows per minute, and can be used to break through walls to release trapped persons. The demonstration was at the civilian defense show at Madison Square Garden, New York

Aluminum collection. A store window display in Rutherford, New Jersey, promoting the National Defense Aluminum Collection (July 21-29, 1941). This collection was conducted by the Office of Civilian Defense and some of the aluminum obtained will be for use in industries producing for national defense. Much of the lower grade aluminum collected which cannot be used directly for this purpose will be used to replace new aluminum in the manufacture of consumer goods, and hence release this new aluminum for use in defense production

Aluminum collection. A store window display in New York, New York, promoting the National Defense Aluminum Collection (July 21-29, 1941). This collection was conducted by the Office of Civilian Defense and some of the aluminum obtained will be for use in industries producing for national defense. Much of the lower grade aluminum collected which cannot be used directly for this purpose will be used to replace new aluminum in the manufacture of consumer goods, and hence release this new aluminum for use in defense production

Aluminum collection. A store window display in New York, New York, promoting the National Defense Aluminum Collection (July 21-29, 1941). This collection was conducted by the Office of Civilian Defense and some of the aluminum obtained will be for use in industries producing for national defense. Much of the lower grade aluminum collected which cannot be used directly for this purpose will be used to replace new aluminum in the manufacture of consumer goods, and hence release this new aluminum for use in defense production

Press Release No. 10, Office of the Secretary, Library of Congress, March 21, 1941

Airplane seat production. See the "V" on the airplane pilot seat? It's the Victory elastic cord which provides the stress needed to counter-balance the pilot's weight during vertical adjustment of the seat. An inspector employed by a large Midwest rubber company now converted to production of war essentials, operates the vertical adjustment release lever which allows movement of the seat while plane is in motion

Aluminum collection. A store window display in New York, New York, promoting the National Defense Aluminum Collection (July 21-29, 1941). This collection was conducted by the Office of Civilian Defense and some of the aluminum obtained will be for use in industries producing for national defense. Much of the lower grade aluminum collected which cannot be used directly for this purpose will be used to replace new aluminum in the manufacture of consumer goods, and hence release this new aluminum for use in defense production

Aluminum collection. A store window display in New York, New York, promoting the National Defense Aluminum Collection (July 21-29, 1941). This collection was conducted by the Office of Civilian Defense and some of the aluminum obtained will be for use in industries producing for national defense. Much of the lower grade aluminum collected which cannot be used directly for this purpose will be used to replace new aluminum in the manufacture of consumer goods, and hence release this new aluminum for use in defense production

Lunch on the job. Lunchtime in the creel room does not release workers from watching the flow of the cord. Whereas there is not often an emergency break, someone must be on hand in case the emergency should arise. Firestone (General Tires), Akron, Ohio

Washington, D.C. International youth assembly. Delegate from New Zealand reading press release on the assembly

Press Release No. 51, Office of the Secretary, Library of Congress, February 12, 1942

Fuel conservation. Home insulation conserves fuel. Every homeowner can get behind his government's efforts to conserve fuel whether he heats his home with oil or coal, and both are strategically important. Fuel savings can be effected by keeping temperatures at reasonable levels, closing off unused rooms, and insulating in various ways. Windows can be weather stripped. Conservation of fuel will help release railroad and other transportation facilities for the movement of fighting materials

Fiberglass manufacture, Owens-Corning, Toledo, Ohio. A worker in a plant of the Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation is packaging bats of lightweight, inorganic, firesafe building insulation. Recent findings by the U.S. Bureau of Mines show that adequate home insulation can save over a billion dollars a year in fuel and release transportation facilities required for the war effort

To keep your wringer operating properly, dry rolls thoroughly after use with a soft cloth and then release lever which removes pressure from the rolls

Victory Corps, tomorrow's defenders of liberty. To release housewives for war work, girls in high school Victory Corps throughout America are helping to operate day nurseries. In addition to helping the community, these students at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, Maryland, receive home economics credit for this work

Press Release No. 88, "The Library of Congress Appoints Fellow in War Bibliography," Library of Congress, November 1, 1942

Sheet metal sub-assemblies for North American B-25 bombers and P-51 fighters are placed in huge stockrooms prior to release on assembly lines

Naval air base, Corpus Christi, Texas. Mounting a navy flying ship at the naval air base in Corpus Christi, Texas, a former department store girl, is one of many women who are taking over jobs to release men for military service. She is a civil service crowler in the assembly and repair department at the base

Fiberglass manufacture, Owens-Corning, Toledo, Ohio. A worker in a plant of the Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation is packaging bats of lightweight, inorganic, firesafe building insulation. Recent findings by the U.S. Bureau of Mines show that adequate home insulation can save over a billion dollars a year in fuel and release transportation facilities required for the war effort

Paramount Picture star sends her typewriter to war. Susan Hayward, Paramount motion picture star, does her share in sending typewriters to war. Pictures shows Miss Hayward selling her machine to the government as her contribution to the typewriter campaign. Uncle Sam needs 600,000 typewriters for the armed services and is contracting all possible typewriter users to urge them to release "1 out of 4" typewriters for Army and Navy service

Geiger Field, Washington. Sighting the tear gas spouting jeep, these members of the Air Corps quickly don their masks. They never know when the driver is going to pull the cord and release a charge of tear gas in their direction, to ensure their being on the alert

High school Victory Corps. To release housewives in Silver Spring, Maryland, for war work, girls in the Victory Corps of Montgomery Blair High School operate a day nursery. Besides helping the community, the project ties in with the school's home economics course

Fiberglass manufacture, Owens-Corning, Toledo, Ohio. A worker in a plant of the Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation is packaging bats of lightweight, inorganic, firesafe building insulation. Recent findings by the U.S. Bureau of Mines show that adequate home insulation can save over a billion dollars a year in fuel and release transportation facilities required for the war effort

Fuel conservation. Home insulation conserves fuel. Every homeowner can get behind his government's efforts to conserve fuel whether he heats his home with oil or coal, and both are strategically important. Fuel savings can be effected by keeping temperatures at reasonable levels, closing off unused rooms, and insulating in various ways. Windows can be weather stripped. Conservation of fuel will help release railroad and other transportation facilities for the movement of fighting materials

Nurse training. Student nurses spend a great deal of time in classrooms, as well as in practice in the wards. Many of the students entering schools of nursing today hope to serve in the Army or the Navy Nurse Corps if the war continues until they graduate; but they realize that they are giving war service as soon as their practice work begins, because they help to release graduate nurses to join the armed services

A Greyhound bus trip from Louisville, Kentucky, to Memphis, Tennessee, and the terminals. Girl returning to her home in Tennessee from Detroit where she went to look for a defense job. She was told she must have a release and came back. On a bus from Louisville to Nashville

Joliet, Illinois. A conductor giving an engineer the signal to apply and release the brakes before the train leaves on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad between Chicago and Chillicothe, Illinois

Joilet, Illinois. Conductor giving the brakeman the signal to apply and release the brakes before the train leaves on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe

Office of War Information news bureau. These OWI reporters work six days a week on stories for both domestic and overseas use. In the course of a week most of them turn out a list of assignments as long as a cub reporter's. Examples of the variety of stories done: "Roundup on wartime transportation," "Industrial feeding program started in war plants," "U.S. Army heroes of Greek descent," "How to get your tires recapped." Stories for domestic release go to the chief of the general news desk. Ken Stewart, chief of the foreign desk, reviews all overseas assignments

Office of War Information News Bureau. Elmer Roessner, chief of the general news desk, talks over a news release with Sutherland Denlinger. The chief of the general news desk keep an eye on all the news that goes out of the news bureau to the seventy- five correspondents in the Office of War Information's Washington press room, to all specialized news media, and to the New York and San Francisco offices of OWI where it is prepared for shortwave radio broadcasts and cable transmission overseas

Freight train operations on the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad between Chicago and Clinton, Iowa. The rear brakeman signals the engineer to apply and release the brakes as a test. This is the "release" sign

A Greyhound bus trip from Louisville, Kentucky, to Memphis, Tennessee, and the terminals. Girl returning to her home in Tennessee from Detroit where she went to look for a defense job. She was told she must have a release and came back. On bus from Louisville to Nashville

Questa, New Mexico. Natives listening to the evening news release from broadcasting station PSA, operated from the parish house by means of loudspeakers by Father Smith, priest to the parish of Questa

Questa, New Mexico. Father Smith broadcasting a news release in Spanish from his parish house broadcasting station

America's petroleum industries pour out fuel and lubricants for the United Nations. These three new catalytic oil "cracking" units are turning out gasoline for the new machines of war at the plant of a large U.S. refining company in the southern U.S. state of Louisiana. In the eight years of the development of the "cracking" process in producing gasoline, it is estimated that 1,000,000,000 barrels of crude oil have been saved by the oil industry. The "cracking" process subjects crude oil to heat and pressure by which the oil molecules are broken down and made to release more of their derivable elements. The drain of war on such gasoline producing units as these is shown by the fact that the U.S. has manufactured 180,000 planes since December 7, 1941, propelled by gasoline motors. For example, one U.S. Liberator four-motored bomber in a six-hour bombing run consumes 1,800 gallons of gasoline, enough to last the average U.S. civilian motorist from three to five years

America's youth builds and flies model planes on miniature flying fields. Two American brothers proudly display their model of a photographic reconnaissance plane. They designed and constructed this small plane which takes photographs through a trap-door installed in the fuselage. Controlled by a time release, the trap door opens in mid-air and operates the shutter of a camera mounted in the plane. Model building has long been a popular hobby of American youth. In 1941 it was estimated that nearly three million boys were actively interested in model building. The National Aeronautics Association through its model divisions, the Academy of Model Aeronautics, has formed an Air Youth Division to bring a coordinated activity in aviation to American youngsters. Post war plans include an Inter-American Model contest to bring the young model builders of South American countries, the U.S. and Canada into friendly competition

NACA photographer Northrop P-61A Black Widow towing P-51B to release altitude of 28,000 ft over Muroc Dry Lake, California for in flight validating of wind tunnel measurements of drag. After the pilot released the tow cable, drag measurementrs were obtained at various airspeeds in a 20-minute unpowered flight. Note: Used in publication in Flight Research at Ames; 57 Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology NASA SP-1998-3300 Fig. 17 ARC-1944-A-6538

Press Release No. 329, Library of Congress, April 3, 1946

Edwin McMillan, left with Ernest Orlando Lawrence at blackboard with cyclotron drawing, taken at the time of the release of the synchrotron story, April 30, 1946. Morgue 1946-10 (P-2), Cooksey 706A [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Edwin McMillan at blackboard with cyclotron drawing on board. Picture taken at the time of the release of the Synchrotron story. Negative envelope dated April 30, 1946. Morgue 1946-10(P-1), XBB6708-04860, and Cooksey 706B [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Press Release No. 468, "Robert Frost, Noted American Poet, to Give Reading at the Library of Congress on Wednesday, March 17," March 12, 1948

Photograph of High Release of Red Pine

Photograph of High Release in Red Pine and White Pine in Furrows

Photograph of White Pine Release