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DC-XA (Delta Clipper) 3rd flight landing at JSC White Sands Test Facility, New Mexico (ref: 9608400) ARC-1969-AC96-0363

STS098-S-005 (7 Feb. 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), Feb. 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the station using the shuttle?s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program. sts098-s-005

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Lights on the Fixed Service Structure give a holiday impression at Launch Pad 39A where Space Shuttle Atlantis is poised for launch. Above the yellow-orange external tank is the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm, with the “beanie cap” vent hood raised. Before cryogenic loading, the hood will be lowered into position over the external tank vent louvers to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the Shuttle. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01padig055

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- This closeup reveals Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the Rotating Service Structure. Extended to the side of Atlantis is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room at its end. The White Room provides entry for the crew into Atlantis’s cockpit. Below Atlantis, on either side of the tail are the tail service masts. They support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft T-0 umbilicals. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01padig054

Space Shuttle Atlantis surpasses the full moon for beauty as it roars into the early evening sky trailing a tail of smoke. The upper portion catches the sun’s rays as it climbs above the horizon and a flock of birds soars above the moon. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0277

STS098-S-010 (7 February 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. sts098-s-010

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Trailing a column of flame-bright smoke, Space Shuttle Atlantis clears the lightning rod on Launch Pad 39A as it climbs into the early evening sky. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0282

The STS-98 crew eagerly exits the Operations and Checkout Building to head for Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. Leading the crew are Pilot Mark Polansky (left) and Commander Ken Cockrell (right). In the center is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. Behind her are Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam (left) and Thomas Jones (right). They will be flying the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0273

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A, the glare from its exhaust is captured in various colors. Liftoff for mission STS-98 occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01pp0280

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins has help getting into her launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0267

The closeout crew in the White Room help STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell with final suitup before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0291

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98, clouds of smoke and steam appear to surround it. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01pp0283

Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0290

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam sends a message to his wife before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0294

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis pours flames and clouds behind as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0286

Its tail bathed in light, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into space on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0289

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is helped getting into his launch and entry suit for the 11-day mission. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0269

Like 10,000 fireworks going off at once, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the moonlit sky while clouds of steam and smoke cascade behind. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. EST KSC01padig056

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins is nearly ready for launch in her launch and entry suit. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0271

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky happily undergoes final suit preparations before he enters Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0293

In the White Room before launch, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins gets a hug from a closeout crew member before she enters Space Shuttle Atlantis. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0295

The STS-98 crew gathers around a table for a snack before getting ready for launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis. Seated left to right are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0265

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tree branches across the water from Launch Pad 39A provide a frame for the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle's robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01PP0281

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones shows a message to his family before he enters Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rising from clouds of smoke and steam, Space Shuttle Atlantis rushes into the night sky as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A. The glare of the flames and clouds is captured in the water near the pad. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0279

Suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam has a thumbs-up for launch. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0270

STS098-S-009 (7 February 2001) --- Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three space walks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. sts098-s-009

This closeup reveals Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the Rotating Service Structure. Extended to the side of Atlantis is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room at its end. The White Room provides entry for the crew into Atlantis’s cockpit. Below Atlantis, on either side of the tail, are the tail service masts. They support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft T-0 umbilicals. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0275

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis erupts from Launch Pad 39A amid billows of smoke and steam as it climbs into the early evening sky. Nearby, pelicans also launch from their perches at the roar of the liftoff.; Launch occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0287

Clouds of smoke and steam roll out from the launch pad as Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the moonlit sky. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. EST KSC01padig058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis spews clouds of smoke and steam over Launch Pad 39A as it blasts into the sky on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01pp0285

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98, it lights up the nearby water. Billows of smoke and steam fill Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01PP0278

Space Shuttle Atlantis is revealed after rollback of the Rotating Service Structure. Extended to the side of Atlantis is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room at its end. The White Room is an environmentally controlled area that provides entry for the crew into Atlantis’s cockpit. Above the yellow-orange external tank is the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm, with the “beanie cap” vent hood raised. Before cryogenic loading, the hood will be lowered into position over the external tank vent louvers to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the Shuttle. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0274

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell shows a thumbs-up attitude as he dons his launch and entry suit. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0266

The STS-98 crew leaves the Operations and Checkout Building and heads for the “Astrovan” that will take them to Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins, Pilot Mark Polansky and Commander Ken Cockrell. They will be flying the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0272

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis leaps up from the flames and smoke behind it as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A into the early evening sky. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0288

While donning his launch and entry suit, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones holds a reminder that the crew will be in space on Valentine’s Day during the 11-day mission. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0268

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians move engine No. 3 toward the aft fuselage of Discovery for installation during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2106

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians prepare to install engine No. 3 to Discovery during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2103

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Another STS-120 solid rocket booster segment waits to be stacked in the Vehicle Assembly Building on the mobile launcher platform. STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2088

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building, the STS-120 solid rocket booster left aft booster and left aft center segments are being stacked on the mobile launcher platform. STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2086

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, the massive space shuttle main engines can be seen installed on orbiter Discovery during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2109

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians prepare to install engine No. 3 to Discovery during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2104

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building, the STS-120 solid rocket booster left aft booster and left aft center segments are being stacked on the mobile launcher platform. STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2084

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians prepare to install engine No. 3 as it nears the aft fuselage of the vehicle during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2105

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians prepare to install engine No. 3 to Discovery during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2102

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this overhead view inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians guide engine No. 3 toward the aft fuselage of Discovery for installation during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2107

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-120 solid rocket booster segments wait to be stacked in the Vehicle Assembly Building on the mobile launcher platform. STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2083

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building, the STS-120 solid rocket booster left aft booster and left aft center segments are being stacked on the mobile launcher platform. STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2087

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at Kennedy Space Center, technicians guide engine No. 3 toward the aft fuselage of Discovery for installation during processing for mission STS-120. Mission STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd2108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building, the STS-120 solid rocket booster left aft booster and left aft center segments are being stacked on the mobile launcher platform. STS-120 will be the 23rd flight to the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery will carry the U.S. Node 2. Launch is targeted for Oct. 20. NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2085

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors of Discovery are being closed in preparation for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2379

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the Ku-band communications antenna is stowed in the payload bay of Discovery before the bay's doors are closed. The stowage is in preparation for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2377

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the left payload bay door of Discovery is being closed in preparation for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. Seen along the edges of the bay are the Canadian-built shuttle robotic arm and orbiter boom sensor system. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2376

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, preparations are under way to close the payload bay doors of Discovery for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. Seen along the edges of the bay are the Canadian-built shuttle robotic arm and orbiter boom sensor system. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2375

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the right payload bay door of Discovery is nearly closed in preparation for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2381

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the Ku-band communications antenna is stowed in the payload bay of Discovery before the bay's doors are closed. The stowage is in preparation for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2378

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the right payload bay door of Discovery is being closed in preparation for the rollover of the orbiter to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The primary payload, the U.S. Node 2, which is named Harmony, will be installed in the payload bay at the pad prior to Discovery's liftoff on mission STS-120. The mission will be the 23rd flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2380

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians in the control booth roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, away from space shuttle Endeavour. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3696

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is revealed after the rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS. In the foreground is the flame trench, which the mobile launcher platform straddles. On top of the external fuel tank is the oxygen vent hood, called the "beanie cap," which is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle. The rollback is preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT and completed at 11:18 a.m. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3698

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The open rotating service structure, or RSS (left), on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida reveals space shuttle Endeavour poised for launch. The RSS was rotated to its open position in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT and completed at 11:18 a.m. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3702

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians in the control booth get ready to roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, above them away from space shuttle Endeavour. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3695

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Visible after rollback of the rotating service structure and looming like giants against the sky are the solid rocket boosters, external tank and space shuttle Endeavour, poised for launch on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Near the top of Endeavour is the White Room, at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides entry into the shuttle for the astronauts. The rollback is preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT and completed at 11:18 a.m. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3700

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is revealed after the rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS. On the left of Endeavour is the White Room, at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides entry into the shuttle for the astronauts. The rollback is preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT and completed at 11:18 a.m. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3699

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the oxygen vent hood, called the "beanie cap," is positioned above the external fuel tank of space shuttle Endeavour following the rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, at left. The beanie cap is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle. The rollback is preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT and completed at 11:18 a.m. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3697

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour, with its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, are poised for launch. The rollback is preparation for Endeavour's liftoff June 13 on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. First motion was at 10:39 a.m. EDT and completed at 11:18 a.m. The rotating structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 13 at 7:17 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3701

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is revealed. The shuttle sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. Above the external tank is the "beanie cap," the oxygen vent hood that is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3726

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians in the control booth (lower left) get ready to roll away the rotating service structure, or RSS, above them from space shuttle Endeavour. First motion was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3722

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is revealed. The shuttle sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. Above the external tank is the "beanie cap," the oxygen vent hood that is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3725

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch. Above the external tank is the "beanie cap," the oxygen vent hood that is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle. At center against Endeavour's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below. On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch.  Above the external tank is the "beanie cap," the oxygen vent hood that is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle.  At center against Endeavour's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm.  The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle.  Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below.  On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven.  This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12.  The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3727
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch. Above the external tank is the "beanie cap," the oxygen vent hood that is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle. At center against Endeavour's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below. On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure, or RSS, at left is rolled away from space shuttle Endeavour. First motion was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3724

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch. Against Endeavour's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below. On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3728

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Framed by branches across the Indian River Lagoon, space shuttle Endeavour waits for launch after rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, at left. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3731

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour waits for launch. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3729

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Viewed across the Indian River Lagoon, space shuttle Endeavour waits for launch after rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, at left. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. At far right is the tank that holds 300,000 gallons of water used for sound suppression during liftoff. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3730

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians in the control booth (lower left) begin to roll away the rotating service structure, or RSS, from space shuttle Endeavour. First motion was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven. This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12. The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3723

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Standing beneath space shuttle Endeavour after its landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida are JEM Development Project Team Project Manager Koki Oikawa and President of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Keiji Tachikawa talking with STS-127 Mission Specialist Julie Payette. Endeavour's landing completed the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Behind Payette is Mission Specialist Christopher Cassidy. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4318

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At a post-landing news conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, participants respond with smiles to a question from the media. From left are NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations William Gerstenmaier, President of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Keiji Tachikawa, Director General of Operations in the Canadian Space Agency Benoit Marcotte, space shuttle Launch Integration Manager Mike Moses and STS-127 Launch Director Pete Nickolenko. Space shuttle Endeavour and crew returned to Earth at 10:48 a.m. EDT to conclude the STS-127 mission. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4374

STS127-S-075 (31 July 2009) --- Space Shuttle Endeavour approaches landing Runway 15 of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA?s Kennedy Space Center, concluding the 16-day, 6.5 million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Onboard are NASA astronauts Mark Polansky, commander; Doug Hurley, pilot; Christopher Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, Dave Wolf, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, all mission specialists. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. (EDT) on July 31, 2009. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. sts127-s-075

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Endeavour kicks up dust as it touches down on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Chuck Tintera KSC-2009-4282

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-127 Mission Specialist Tom Marshburn takes part in a news conference following the landing of space shuttle Endeavour. The landing completed the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4323

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The unfurled drogue chute slows space shuttle Endeavour as it lands on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews KSC-2009-4288

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Bob Cabana takes a close look at the tiles beneath space shuttle Endeavour after its landing that completed the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4310

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At a post-landing news conference, Public Affairs Officer Allard Beutel (far left) moderates the question-and-answer session with NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations William Gerstenmaier, President of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Keiji Tachikawa, Director General of Operations in the Canadian Space Agency Benoit Marcotte, space shuttle Launch Integration Manager Mike Moses and STS-127 Launch Director Pete Nickolenko. Space shuttle Endeavour and crew returned to Earth at 10:48 a.m. EDT to conclude the STS-127 mission. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4372

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-127 Commander Mark Polansky takes part in a news conference following the landing of space shuttle Endeavour. The landing completed the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4326

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (left) waits underneath space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-127 crew to emerge from the crew transport vehicle. Endeavour's landing completed the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour's main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4308

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour arrives in Orbiter Processing Facility #2. Endeavour landed at 10:48 a.m. EDT, completing a journey of 6.5-million miles on the STS-127 mission. Umbilicals are still attached to purge the vehicle of any possible residual explosive or toxic fumes. Towing normally begins within four hours after landing and is completed within six hours unless removal of time-sensitive experiments is required on the runway. In the OPF, turnaround processing procedures on Endeavour will include various post-flight deservicing and maintenance functions, which are carried out in parallel with payload removal and the installation of equipment needed for the next mission. The STS-127 mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4385

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The drogue chute slows space shuttle Endeavour on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4277

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Endeavour nears touchdown on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-4301

STS127-S-072 (31 July 2009) --- Space Shuttle Endeavour's drag chute is deployed as the spacecraft rolls toward wheels stop on Runway 15 of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, concluding the 16-day, 6.5 million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Onboard are NASA astronauts Mark Polansky, commander; Doug Hurley, pilot; Christopher Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, Dave Wolf, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, all mission specialists. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. (EDT) on July 31, 2009. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. sts127-s-072

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – STS-127 Commander Mark Polansky kneels next to the landing gear on space shuttle Endeavour. He and other crew members returned to Earth on Endeavour to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4319

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Endeavour's landing gear approaches contact with Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Tom Joseph KSC-2009-4278

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is towed away from the Shuttle Landing Facility. It is being taken to the Orbiter Processing Facility #2. Endeavour landed at 10:48 a.m. EDT, completing a journey of 6.5-million miles on the STS-127 mission. Umbilicals are still attached to purge the vehicle of any possible residual explosive or toxic fumes. Towing normally begins within four hours after landing and is completed within six hours unless removal of time-sensitive experiments is required on the runway. In the OPF, turnaround processing procedures on Endeavour will include various post-flight deservicing and maintenance functions, which are carried out in parallel with payload removal and the installation of equipment needed for the next mission. The STS-127 mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4378

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph & Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-4290

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour rolls into Orbiter Processing Facility #2. Endeavour landed at 10:48 a.m. EDT, completing a journey of 6.5-million miles on the STS-127 mission. Umbilicals are still attached to purge the vehicle of any possible residual explosive or toxic fumes. Towing normally begins within four hours after landing and is completed within six hours unless removal of time-sensitive experiments is required on the runway. In the OPF, turnaround processing procedures on Endeavour will include various post-flight deservicing and maintenance functions, which are carried out in parallel with payload removal and the installation of equipment needed for the next mission. The STS-127 mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4383

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour turns into Orbiter Processing Facility #2. Endeavour landed at 10:48 a.m. EDT, completing a journey of 6.5-million miles on the STS-127 mission. Umbilicals are still attached to purge the vehicle of any possible residual explosive or toxic fumes. Towing normally begins within four hours after landing and is completed within six hours unless removal of time-sensitive experiments is required on the runway. In the OPF, turnaround processing procedures on Endeavour will include various post-flight deservicing and maintenance functions, which are carried out in parallel with payload removal and the installation of equipment needed for the next mission. The STS-127 mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4382

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Bob Cabana (left) and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden wait near space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-127 crew to emerge from the crew transport vehicle. Endeavour's landing completed the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4312

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Endeavour kicks up dust as it touches down on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Tom Joseph KSC-2009-4279

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The main landing gear of space shuttle Endeavour touches down on the pavement of Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4274

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – With landing gear lowered, space shuttle Endeavour drops quickly toward Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour landed on orbit 248. Main gear touchdown was at 10:48:08 a.m. EDT. Nose gear touchdown was at 10:48:21 a.m. and wheels stop was at 10:49:13 a.m. Endeavour delivered the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section to the International Space Station. The mission was the 29th flight to the station, the 23rd flight of Endeavour and the 127th in the Space Shuttle Program, as well as the 71st landing at Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Chuck Tintera KSC-2009-4306