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President Wilson and President Poincare of France

President Wilson and President Poincare of France

President Wilson and President Poincare of France

PEARL, RAYMOND, PH.D., BIOLOGIST

Raymond Ares (left) and Pierre Lang (right) are refugees from Nancy who have been adopted as mascots by the A.E.F. Raymond by the Aero Squadron, and Pierre by the Machine Gun Battalion. Raymond wrote to his godfathers that he loves to run and jump and wrestle. He is by his own profession, "very intelligent but a little lazy" and his teachers call him "bon petit diable." Happily, not even the war and the loss of his soldier father could take the "pep" out of him. He is a god son that any A.E.F. organization can be proud of. The A.R.C. administers the funds for the maintenance of all the children adopted by the American troops

Raymond Ares (left) and Pierre Lang (right) are refugees from Nancy who have been adopted as mascots by the A.E.F., Raymond by the 656th Aero Squadron, and Pierre by the 101st Machine Gun Battalion. Raymond wrote to his god-fathers that he loves to run and jump and wrestle. He is, by his own profession "very intelligent but a little lazy" and his teaachers call him a "bon petit diable". Happily, not even the war and the loss of his home, and the death of his soldier father could take the "pep" out of him. He is a god son that any A.E.F. organization can be proud of. The AMERICAN RED CROSS administers the funds for the maintanence of all the children adopted by the American troops

Raymond Dickey

PEARL, RAYMOND, PH.D., BIOLOGIST

President Wilson and President Poincare of France

Raymond Ares (left) and Pierre Lang (right) are refugees from Nancy who have been adopted as mascots by the A.E.F., Raymond by the 656th Aero Squadron, and Pierre by the 101st Machine Gun Battalion. Raymond wrote to his god-fathers that he loves to run and jump and wrestle. He is, by his own profession "very intelligent but a little lazy" and his teaachers call him a "bon petit diable." Happily, not even the war and the loss of his home, and the death of his soldier father could take the "pep" out of him. He is a god son that any A.E.F. organization can be proud of. The AMERICAN RED CROSS administers the funds for the maintanence of all the children adopted by the American troops

[Raymond Benjamin Caldwell, Yankee pitcher, full-length portrait, facing right, with right arm extended outward after throwing baseball]

President Wilson and President Poincare of France

Seamen's Identification Card for Raymond Ross Allen

Small group of overseas soldiers who applied for Naturalization, June 6, 1919. Man in center is Raymond Christ, Director of Citizenship, Bureau of Naturalization, Department of Labor

SHIPPING BOARD, U.S. RAYMOND B. STEVENS, RIGHT, VICE-CHAIRMAN OF BOARD, AT THE ENTRANCE WITH SINGER, AND LIBERTY LOAN DRIVE

Large group of overseas soldiers who applied for Naturalization, June 6, 1919. Man in center is Raymond Crist, Director of Citizenship, Bureau of Naturalization, Department of Labor

BAKER, RAYMOND T., U.S. MINT. LEFT, WITH SEN. SWANSON

Baron Raymond de Waha

Baron Raymond de Waha

Herald, 400 Raymond St., Chevy Chase, [Maryland]

Raymond T. Baker, Bainbridge Colby

Baron Raymond de Waha

Baron Raymond de Waha

J. Raymond McCarl, Comp[...] Gen'l

J. Raymond McCarl, 7/2/21[?]

Director of the Mint, Raymond T. Baker, and Anthony de Francisci examining model of new silver dollar, the first of which will be issued by Jan. 1st

F.E. Scobey, Raymond T. Baker, [3/17/22]

Raymond Hitchcock

F.E. Scobey, Raymond T. Baker, 3/17/22

House of "Raymond Big Crow"

[Raymond Poincaré]

Building (Raymond Cut's House)

House of "Raymond Big Crow"

Raymond Parks' sister Gemica Heard at age 3 yrs., Raymond A. Parks at age 20 years

Building (Raymond Cut's House)

Raymond P. Sansen

House of "Raymond Janis"

[Tree planting ceremony to commemorate Mother's Day, with Raymond Thompson costumed as George Washington, and school girls costumed as state flowers, on grounds of U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C.]

Raymond High School Prize speaking contest. Monday, March 9. Methodist Church 8 P. M ... Admission 25 c.

Representatives with page Raymond Taylor, [12/19/25]

J. Raymond McCarl (Compt. Gen.)

Samuel Raymond Jr, Rep Fenn & Elizabeth Geastetter (champ speller)

J. Raymond McCarl (Compt. Gen.)

[Members of the Brooklyn New York Chamber of Commerce led by Raymond H. Fiero, posed standing with President Coolidge]

High hat owned by Raymond Norton

1940 Census Enumeration District Maps - Washington - Pacific County - Raymond - ED 25-32 - ED 25-40

Architects and their work, Raymond M. Hood, Rockefeller Center. Mr. Hood in arched gateway I

Seventy-one years, or, My life with photography. Raymond Hood, architect-in-chief, Rockefeller Center, July 3, 1931

FIRST LADY LIGHTS BIRTHDAY CAKE. MRS. ROOSEVELT LIGHTS THE CANDLES ON THE BIRTHDAY CAKE AT THE SHOREHAM HOTEL BIRTHDAY BALL OF PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT. THE PRESIDENT REMAINED AT THE WHITE HOUSE AND HAD WITH HIM A FEW CLOSE FRIENDS. IN THE ABOVE PICTURE MRS. WOODROW WILSON IS ON THE EXTREME LEFT. DIRECTLY BEHIND THE CAKE IS MRS. CURTIS DALL. MAJ. WILLIAM HORTON IS BETWEEN MRS. DALL AND MRS. ROOSEVELT AND RAYMOND T. BAKER, CHAIRMAN OF THE BIRTHDAY BALL COMMITTEE, IS ON THE RIGHT OF THE PICTURE

4-H Chickens, Raymond Hallow Horn Bear

"Lemme see." Ira Campbell, New York attorney for American steamship owner ass'n, testifying before the Senate lobby investigating committee on the Shi-subsidy bill, said he talked with Raymond (Brin-Trust) Moley and Kermit Roosevelt concerning the legislation. Campbell said he didn't write the bill. 8/24/35

Caught in the act., Washington, D.C. Aug. 14. William E. Raymond has been cracking safes most of his life but has never served a sentence in jail. He works for a safe and lock company and has made safe cracking his life profession. He is known all over the country as a master with finger tips, drills, or Acotylone torches. Time and again Raymond has proved a [à] to Washington bankers and businessmen when they have locked their safes and forgotten the combination. He refuses to divulge the exact technique of getting into safes without tools for fear of safe breakers operating outside the law might pick up a point or two

Left to right: Lt. C.M. Durgin, Chief of Aeronautical Chart Section; John J. Braund; Raymond K. Peck, compiling and drafting aeronautical charts

Binder loaded on a truck, preparatory to moving it. The rear wheels of the truck were lowered by digging pits to facilitate loading the binder. Raymond Zink, tenant farmer, is moving from one farm to another twenty-four miles away. Near Templeton, Indiana

Borah greets Moley. Washington, D.C., March 23. Senator William E. Borah, Republican from Idaho, greets Raymond Moley, former ace member of the Roosevelt "brain trust" as he arrived to express his opposition to the president's court reform plan before the Senate Judiciary Committee, 3/23/1937

Dr. Geo. W. Lewis, Raymond W. Young

Speaks at C of C meeting. Washington, D.C., April 29. During a discussion of banking practices at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce meeting today, Raymond N. Ball, Rochester banker and head of the New York State Bankers' Association, accused bankers of being swayed by "prejudice, custom and self interest" rather than "intelligent reasoning based on facts," 4/29/1937

"Listening up." Washington, D.C., March 23. Joseph P. Tumulty, (left) former Secretary to the late President Wilson and now a prominent Washington attorney, "listens in" with Senator Harry Flood Byrd, of Virginia, to the opposers of the President's court reform plan before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Raymond Moley, original member ofthe Roosevelt "brain trust" and now a New York editor, was the outstanding witness today, 3/25/1937

First calculating machine presented to Smithsonian. Washington, D.C., March 31. An old macaroni box filled with an arrangement of wheels, rubber bands, meat skewers and staples which was the forerunner of the modern key-driven, multiple-order calculating machine, was presented to the Smithsonian Institution today. The scarred old box was designed and constructed by Dorr E. Felt, young Chicago mechanic, 52 years ago when he first started in to solve the problem of what is now the modern calculating machine. Mrs. Raymond J. Koch, (right) oldest daughter of the late inventor, is shown making the prsentation to Dr. Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. In the center is Raymond J. Koch, 3/31/1937

Caught in the act., Washington, D.C. Aug. 14. William E. Raymond has been cracking safes most of his life but has never served a sentence in jail. He works for a safe and lock company and has made safe cracking his life profession. He is known all over the country as a master with finger tips, drills, or Acotylone torches. Time and again Raymond has proved a à to Washington bankers and businessmen when they have locked their safes and forgotten the combination. He refuses to divulge the exact technique of getting into safes without tools for fear of safe breakers operating outside the law might pick up a point or two

First calculating machine presented to Smithsonian. Washington, D.C., March 31. An old macaroni box filled with an arrangement of wheels, rubber bands, meat skewers and staples which was the forerunner of the modern key-driven, multiple-order calculating machine, was presented to the Smithsonian Institution today. The scarred old box was designed and constructed by Dorr E. Felt, young Chicago mechanic, 52 years ago when he first started in to solve the problem of what is now the modern calculating machine. Mrs. Raymond J. Koch, (right) oldest daughter of the late inventor, is shown making the prsentation to Dr. Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. In the center is Raymond J. Koch, 3311937

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond H. Combs

Early Radiation Laboratory staff framed by the magnet for the 60-inch cyclotron in 1938. Front row, left to right: John H. Lawrence, Robert Serber, Franz N.D. Kurie, Raymond T. Birge, Ernest O. Lawrence, Donald Cooksey, Arthur H. Snell, Luis W. Alvarezz, Philip H. Abelson. Second row: John Backus, Wilfred B. Mann, Paul C. Aebersold, Edwin M. McMillan, Ernest Lyman, Martin D. Kamen, D.C. Kalbfell, W.W. Salisbury. Back row: Alex S. Langsdorf, Jr., Sam Simmons, Joseph G. Hamilton, David H. Sloan, J. Robert Oppenheimer, William Brobeck, Robert Cornog, Robert R. Wilson, Eugene Viez, J.J. Livingood. [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond H. Combs

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond H. Combs

Gridiron widows. Taking a bow here is Mrs. Raymond Clapper, Ringmaster at the round-up of presidential candidates wives

An Aviation forum. Washington, D.C., Feb. 21. Harvey L. Williams, left, representing Governor Raymond E. Baldwin of Connecticut, and Casey Jones, veteran flyer, snapped at the National Aviation Forum being held at the Mayflower Hotel. Jones spoke on "the contribution of the trade schools to aviation"

House Committee considers impeachment of Labor Secretary. Washington, D.C., Jan. 25. The House Judiciary Committee today considered charges contained in an impeachment resolution presented yesterday by Rep. J Parnell Thomas, but postponed action until tomorrow. Members shown here are: Front row; Wallace E. Pierce, Charles F. McLaughlin, Francis E. Walter, Hatton Sumners, chairman of the Committee, Zebulon Weaver, Raymond S. Springer; Back row; B.J. Monkiewicz, Louis E. Graham, John W. Gwynne, Earl Michener, U.S. Guyer, Abe Murdock, Dave (E)? Satterfield, Jr. William T. Byrne, James M. Barnes, 1-25-39

Raymond A. Rose, residence on Clapboard Ridge Rd., Greenwich, Connecticut. Exterior

Legion Commander speaks before National Press Club. Washington, D.C., Nov. 28. Raymond J. Kelly, National Commander of the American Legion was a luncheon guest of the National Press Club today after which he spoke off-the-record to the members on 'the world, the nation, and the legion'

Raymond, Edwin McMillan, Robert Wilson, David Sloan, and Bill Farley at 60-inch cyclotron target side, June 12, 1939. Cooksey 18 [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the controls of the 60-inch. cyclotron with Dr. Raymond, Edwin McMillan, and Winfield W. Salisbury standing behind control panel. Negative envelope dated June 12, 1939. Cooksey 17 [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Raymond D. Baker, Hollywood, Florida. Exterior from entrance court

Dr. Raymond D. Baker, Hollywood, Florida. Living room, to fireplace

U.S. anti-aircraft gun crew. Corporal Raymond Elliott holds a clip of anti-aircraft shells before loading the weapon of his Negro gun crew at a U.S. Army air base in the New Hebrides in the South Pacific

Dr. Raymond D. Baker, Hollywood, Florida. Living room, to hall

Dr. Raymond D. Baker, Hollywood, Florida. Exterior from beach

Dr. Raymond D. Baker, Hollywood, Florida. Guest bedroom

Mr. Raymond J. Wendell

Mr. Raymond J. Wendell

Dr. Raymond D. Baker, Hollywood, Florida. Guest wing entrance

Troops at a U.S. Army airbase in New Hebrides manning a heavy machine gun. Left to right: Private First Class Elliott Moore, Trenton, New Jersey; Corporal Raymond Elliott, Jaspar, Alabama; Corporal Johnny Jackson, Augusta, Georgia; Private First Class Shade Mackee, Jr., Ashland, Alabama

Industrial salvage. Marine iron and steel scrap. Steel for war production is saved by reconditioning the wooden tug "Raymond" at the Seabrook, Louisiana yard of the Standard Dredging Corporation. To avoid replacing it by a new steel tug, general repairs are made on this vessel needed on war projects. Pontoon pipes are in the foreground. Standard Dredging Corporation

Fort Myer, Virginia. Jeeps on parade at Fort Myer, Virginia, at ceremonies honoring Staff Sergeant Jackson L. Dietz, Jr. and Technical Sergeant Raymond Davidson, for rescuing a comrade from a fire in the company machine shop

Raymond W. Bellamy

The Hardwick Victory Store is back in operation and scenes like this are again being witnessed daily. This picture shows a typical transaction of business: Raymond Duby, in buggy, buying a commode. George Slayton and Guy Larabee lend a hand loading the furniture

Industrial salvage. Marine iron and steel scrap. Steel for war production is saved by reconditioning the wooden tug "Raymond" at the Seabrook, Louisiana yard of the Standard Dredging Corporation. To avoid replacing it by a new steel tug, general repairs are made on this vessel needed on war projects. Pontoon pipes are in the foreground. Standard Dredging Corporation

J. Raymond Nunan

Raymond W. Bellamy

Fort Myer, Virginia. Husky six-foot soldiers stand in review at ceremonies at Fort Myer, Virginia, honoring Staff Sergeant Jackson L. Dietz, Jr. and Technical Sergeant Raymond Davidson, for rescuing a comrade from a fire in the company machine shop

Corporal Raymond Elliott of Jaspar, Alabama, about to load an anti-aircraft gun at an army air base in the New Hebrides

Washington, D.C. International student assembly. Paul Lwi-Uen, a student at the University of Michigan; Gioh Fang, DJU, Chungking, China; Raymond Chin, at the Chinese embassy

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Fire Captain Raymond Runk is an accountant at the animal trap company

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Volunteer fire watchers, sitting on the fire engines in the fire house, listening to a lecture on the uses of gas in warfare given by Raymond Runk

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Runk, fire captain, lecturing volunteer fire watchers on the uses of gas in war in the Lititz firehouse

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Newswanger works a lathe in the Animal Trap Company machine shop. He's a Mennonite, about thirty, and hopes his church won't find out he's doing defense work. Most Mennonites are farmers, and Newswanger used to be

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Runk, accountant at the Animal Trap Company, computing which employees are to receive war bonds this month. 96% of the employees at this factory subscribe 10% of their wages for war bonds

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Runk, accountant at the Animal Trap Company and fire captain, giving a lecture on German bombs to Boy Scouts who are learning to be messengers. In emergencies, their duty would be to report fire bombs to the proper people

The Hardwick victory store is back in operation and scenes like this are again being witnessed daily. This picture shows a typical transaction of business: Raymond Duby, in buggy, buying a commode. George Slayton and Guy Larrabee lend a hand loading the furniture

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Runk, accountant at the Animal Trap Company and fire captain, giving a lecture on German bombs to Boy Scouts who are learning to be messengers. In emergencies, their duty would be to report fire bombs to the proper people