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Raffaello Maffei (1456–1522)

Santi, Raffaello

Santi, Raffaello

Santi, Raffaello

S114E7081 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7046 - STS-114 - Lawrence reviews inventory inside Raffaello

S114E7085 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7045 - STS-114 - Lawrence reviews inventory inside Raffaello

S114E7082 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E6272 - STS-114 - Raffaello MPLM

S114E7086 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7080 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7088 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7077 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7078 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7087 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7084 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7083 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

S114E7079 - STS-114 - Raffaello interior

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An Airbus Beluga transporter taxis down the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver the first of three Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), designed to transport experiments and supplies in a pressurized environment to and from the International Space Station (ISS). The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The first MPLM has been named Leonardo and is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc885

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An Airbus Beluga transporter parks on the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver the first of three Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), designed to transport experiments and supplies in a pressurized environment to and from the International Space Station (ISS). The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The first MPLM has been named Leonardo, and is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc886

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cranes lower the canister containing the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS). The Leonardo module arrived at KSC aboard the Airbus Beluga transporter, at left of the canister. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc880

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS), rests on the truck that will move it to the Space Station ProcessingFacility. Named the Leonardo, the MPLM arrived aboard the Airbus Beluga transporter, at left. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc881

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The canister containing the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, passes the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to the Space Station Processing Facility. Destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS), the MPLM arrived aboard an Airbus Beluga transporter. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc882

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cranes lower the canister containing the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS). The Leonardo module arrived at KSC aboard the Airbus Beluga transporter, at left of the canister. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc879

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With the nose of the Airbus Beluga transporter open, KSC workers prepare to unload the canister holding the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Dubbed Leonardo, the module is destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS). Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc884

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC personnel watch as workers at the Shuttle Landing Facility begin unloading the canister containing the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, from the Airbus Beluga transporter. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc883

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians from Boeing and Alenia Aerospazio wait on a work stand at the Space Station Processing Facility to check out the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), being lowered. KSC personnel below watch the process. The module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc889

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians prepare to remove the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, from the canister that carried it from Italy to KSC. Destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS), the module is one of three being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc888

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians from Boeing and Alenia Aerospazio (above) and KSC personnel (below) watch as the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is secured on the work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc890

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), named Leonardo, is moved by crane toward a waiting work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. Workers from Alenia Aerospazio, which provided the module, wait to check it out. The module is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc887

Technicians from Boeing and Alenia Aerospazio look over the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). The Italian-built MPLM is undergoing testing in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc892

The first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS) sits on the work stand where it will undergo testing in the Space Station Processing Facility. The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc891

Visitors watch processing of the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS) from a new tour stop in the Space Station Processing Facility. The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc893

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians from Boeing and Alenia Aerospazio (above) as well as KSC workers (below) watch as the end cap is removed from the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc896

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians from Boeing and Alenia Aerospazio work to remove the end cap from the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS) during testing in the Space Station Processing Facility. The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc894

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians and workers watch as the Rack Insertion Device (at left) moves the end cap away from the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) (at right) for the International Space Station (ISS). The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is undergoing testing at the Space Station Processing Facility. It is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc899

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians and workers watch as the Rack Insertion Device (at left) removes the end cap from the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is undergoing testing at the Space Station Processing Facility. It is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc898

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The inside of the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS) is seen after the end cap is removed. The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is undergoing testing at the Space Station Processing Facility. It is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc897

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians from Boeing and Alenia Aerospazio watch as the end cap is removed from the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three from Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc895

Michael Kinnan (left), with International Space Station (ISS) Launch Site Integration Office, and Todd McIntyre, with ISS International Elements, review paperwork for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three to be provided by Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. In the background, technicians from The Boeing Company and Alenia Aerospazio are preparing the first MPLM for flight. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc906

Michael Kinnan (left), with International Space Station (ISS) Launch Site Integration Office, and Todd McIntyre, with ISS International Elements, review paperwork for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The Italian-built module, named Leonardo, is one of three to be provided by Alenia Aerospazio, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. In the background, technicians from The Boeing Company and Alenia Aerospazio are preparing the first MPLM for flight. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second MPLM, named Raffaello, is scheduled to be handed over in April 1999. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc905

STS-100 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam crawls through the hatch of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) that will be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999. The Italian-built MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. Named Leonardo, the MPLM is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia Aerospazio. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc924

(Left to right) STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield, Salimbeti Andrea of Alenia Aerospazio, observer Astronaut Winston Scott, and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam examine the interior of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo. The Italian-built MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. It is expected to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour scheduled for launch on Dec. 2, 1999. Leonardo is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc925

Salimbeti Andrea, with the Italian company Alenia Aerospazio, and STS-100 Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Chris Hadfield (Canada) inspect the opening to the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) that will be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999. The Italian-built MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. Named Leonardo, the MPLM is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc922

STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield (Canada), Salimbeti Andrea (of Alenia Aerospazio), observers Astronaut Winston Scott and Scott McIntyre, and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam take a close look at the opening of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) that will be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999. Behind them is Paolo Prato , a systems engineer with Alenia. The MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. Named Leonardo, the MPLM is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia Aerospazio. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc923

(Center) The Multi-Purpose Launch Module, named Leonardo, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At left is a Rack Insertion Device. Above the Leonardo are the windows of the tour room where visitors can watch the activities in the SSPF. Scheduled to be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999, the Italian-built MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. The Leonardo is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia Aerospazio. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc992

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST "Beluga" Super Transporter lands in the rain at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1005

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST "Beluga" Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it taxis toward the mate/demate tower at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1006

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST "Beluga" Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it comes to a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1007

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST "Beluga" Super Transporter touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1004

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello rests in its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) as an Alenia Aerospazio worker passes by. The Italian aerospace company will provide engineering support for Raffaello, along with NASA, Boeing and the Italian Space Agency. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1027

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers on cranes circle the "Beluga" Super Transporter at the Shuttle Landing Facility, ready to help offload the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1013

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers begin offloading the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS), from the "Beluga" Super Transporter that brought it from Italy. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1012

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers remove the top of the shipping canister from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. After transfer to a workstand, the MPLM will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1021

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers from the Italian aerospace company Alenia Aerospazio begin removing the protective cover from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. The Italian aerospace company will provide engineering support for Raffaello, along with NASA, Boeing and the Italian Space Agency. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1029

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS), named Raffaello, is moved out of the "Beluga" Super Transporter at the Shuttle Landing Facility. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1015

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello waits for transfer to a workstand. There it will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1022

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under clear and cloud-spotted skies at the Shuttle Landing Facility, cranes support the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello after the "Beluga" Super Transporter (left) has rolled away from it. Raffaello will be transferred to the Space Station Processing Facility for testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1016

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello arrives in its shipping canister at the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). There it will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1019

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cranes supporting the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello lower it onto a transporter for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF the Raffaello will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1017

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers begin removing the shipping canister from around the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. After transfer to a workstand, the MPLM will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1020

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A crane is attached to the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS), before offloading the MPLM from the "Beluga" Super Transporter. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1014

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers oversee the placement of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello as a crane lowers it onto a workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1026

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the one-piece, upward-hinged main cargo door of the Airbus Industrie A300-600ST "Beluga" Super Transporter is open to offload its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support KSC-99pp1011

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello is lifted out of its canister by an overhead crane. It will be moved to a workstand to undergo testing. Raffaello joins the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1023

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers from the Italian aerospace company Alenia Aerospazio begin removing the protective cover from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. The Italian aerospace company will provide engineering support for Raffaello, along with NASA, Boeing and the Italian Space Agency. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1028

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello sits on a transporter waiting for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF the Raffaello will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1018

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello is suspended above a workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) where it will undergo testing. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Also inside the SSPF is the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also undergoing testing for its launch on mission STS-102 scheduled for June 29, 2000. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1025

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers on the floor oversee the transfer of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello to a workstand where it will undergo testing. Sharing the space in the SSPF is the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, seen at right, and the U.S. Lab, Destiny, in the background. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1024

This aerial view shows the construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Shuttle Landing Facility, with (left) a C-5 air cargo plane, the offloaded canister in front of it containing the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and (right) the mate/demate tower that is used when an orbiter is transported to and from KSC atop a modified Boeing 747. The RLV complex will also include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000. KSC-99pp-1046

The Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) appears overflowing with racks and wires being used to support work on elements of the International Space Station. Currently housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab Destiny and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Leonardo and Raffaello. Destiny, element 5A of the station, is scheduled for launch on mission STS-98 in August; Leonardo, element 5A.1, on mission STS-102 in October; and Raffaello, element 6A, on mission STS-100 in November KSC-00pp0183

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the hardware and equipment filling the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Other elements of the International Space Station also housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab, Destiny; the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo; and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC-00pp0300

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0297
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0298

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0297
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0299

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0299

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the hardware and equipment filling the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Other elements of the International Space Station also housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab, Destiny; the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo; and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC00pp0300

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility stand outside the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. One of Italy's major contribution to the International Space Station program, Raffaello is a reusable logistics carrier to resupply and return Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. It is slated as a payload on mission STS-100. A date has not yet been determined for the mission KSC-00pp0295

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the center of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), which is filled with other hardware and equipment for the International Space Station. Elsewhere in the SSPF are also the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the Space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC00pp0301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0298

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules, Italian-built Raffaello and Leonardo, undergo testing. Italy's major contributions to the International Space Station program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions KSC-00pp0294

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility stand outside the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello (left). At right is the MPLM Leonardo. They are reusable logistics carriers to resupply the International Space Station, and return cargo, that requires a pressurized environment. The MPLMs are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions KSC-00pp0296

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules, Italian-built Raffaello and Leonardo, undergo testing. Italy's major contributions to the International Space Station program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions KSC00pp0294

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility stand outside the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. One of Italy's major contribution to the International Space Station program, Raffaello is a reusable logistics carrier to resupply and return Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. It is slated as a payload on mission STS-100. A date has not yet been determined for the mission KSC00pp0295

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the center of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), which is filled with other hardware and equipment for the International Space Station. Elsewhere in the SSPF are also the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the Space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC-00pp0301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Station Processing Facility is filled with hardware, components for the International Space Station. Lined up (left to right) are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined. KSC-00pp0292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility stand outside the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello (left). At right is the MPLM Leonardo. They are reusable logistics carriers to resupply the International Space Station, and return cargo, that requires a pressurized environment. The MPLMs are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions KSC00pp0296

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Station Processing Facility is filled with hardware, components for the International Space Station. Lined up (left to right) are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined. KSC00pp0292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello, seen here, is one of two in the Space Station Processing Facility. The other is named Leonardo. Both MPLMs are components built by Italy for the International Space Station. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001. Leonardo is scheduled on an earlier mission, STS-102, the 8th flight early in 2001 KSC-00pp0777

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility sit Raffaello (left) and Leonardo (right), two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs) built by Italy for the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled on mission STS-102, the 8th flight to the Space Station early in 2001. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001 KSC-00pp0782

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo, seen here, is one of two in the Space Station Processing Facility. The other is named Raffaello. Both MPLMs are components built by Italy for the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled on mission STS-102, the 8th flight to the Space Station early in 2001. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight, later in 2001 KSC00pp0780

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility sits Raffaello, one of two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs) built by Italy for the International Space Station. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001. The other MPLM is Leonardo, scheduled on an earlier mission, STS-102, the 8th flight early in 2001 KSC00pp0778

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility sit Raffaello (left) and Leonardo (right), two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs) built by Italy for the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled on mission STS-102, the 8th flight to the Space Station early in 2001. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001 KSC00pp0782

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello, seen here, is one of two in the Space Station Processing Facility. The other is named Leonardo. Both MPLMs are components built by Italy for the International Space Station. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001. Leonardo is scheduled on an earlier mission, STS-102, the 8th flight early in 2001 KSC00pp0777

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA -- In the Space Station Processing Facility sit Leonardo (left) and Raffaello (right), two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs) built by Italy for the International Space Station. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001. The other MPLM is Leonardo, scheduled on an earlier mission, STS-102, the 8th flight early in 2001 KSC00pp0779

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo, seen here, is one of two in the Space Station Processing Facility. The other is named Raffaello. Both MPLMs are components built by Italy for the International Space Station. Leonardo is scheduled on mission STS-102, the 8th flight to the Space Station early in 2001. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight, later in 2001 KSC-00pp0780

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility sits Raffaello, one of two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs) built by Italy for the International Space Station. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001. The other MPLM is Leonardo, scheduled on an earlier mission, STS-102, the 8th flight early in 2001 KSC-00pp0781

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility sits Raffaello, one of two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs) built by Italy for the International Space Station. Raffaello is scheduled on mission STS-100, the 9th flight to the Space Station in 2001. The other MPLM is Leonardo, scheduled on an earlier mission, STS-102, the 8th flight early in 2001 KSC00pp0781