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Circular chart correlating directions, winds, elements, seasons, temperaments, qualities, and ages; in the spandrels, grotesques, a fighting man and a queen.

[Diagram of Gilbert's terella, or earth model, a spherical magnet used to show earth's magnetic qualities; with decorated initial C and surrounding text]

To the public. The undersigned having entered into a correspondence with Dabney S. Carr, hat to inform all honorable men that he has found him altogether destitute of the qualities of a gentlemen. Frederick Pinkney. Baltimore. October 15, 1828.

The Little Iron Ute Spring, in Ingleman's Cañon famous for its tonic and blood purifuing qualities.(At foot of Pikes's Peak, Colo.)

The Little Iron Ute Spring, in Ingleman's Cañon famous for its tonic and blood purifuing qualities.(At foot of Pikes's Peak, Colo.)

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

One of the group of Pagosa Hot Springs, showing incrustation on the surface. Much prized by the Indians and miners on account of supposed healing qualities. Principal mineral element, Sulphate of Soda.

Alice C. Evans, Facter[.] in Dairy Division, Dept. of Agrl. who studes microscopic organisms and their relation to health, flavor and keeping qualities of dairy products

And now we have the "wool meter." Speaking of taxi-meters, yardsticks, and other measuring devices, the "wool meter" has been introduced by the Bureau of Standards. Described by the forbidding name "eriometer," this new instrument is intended to measure the diameter of wool fibers and thus indicate the relative qualities of the fleece entering into our wool clothes. H.J. McNicholas of the Textile Section is shown with his invention, which employs the principle of diffraction of light

Electric Institute of Washington. Advertisement for the superior lighting qualities of I.E.S. lamps

Defies Uncle Sam. Washington, D.C. Aug. 14. After much persuasion William H. Abbott, 77, finally signed the papers agreeing to sell his house to the government but has now refused to move after receiving several notices from Treasury agents. The ground is wanted for the new Bureau of Engraving and Printing Annex. Abbott has spent half of his life collecting data on the health-giving qualities of pineapple juice. He claims pineapple juice has cured all of his ills and is responsible for his present age

Consumer education: how to discriminate between various qualities and labels. Exhibit entitled "Chamber of Horrors" in co-op store in Greenbelt, Maryland

A young soldier of the armored forces holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism. Infantryman with halftrack

A young soldier of the armored forces holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism. Infantryman with halftrack

Infantryman with halftrack, a young soldier of the armed forces, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism.

Infantryman with halftrack, a young soldier of the armed forces, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism.

The fine maneuvering qualities of the Army's halftrac scout car depends largely on the tractor belt. The mounting of the belt on the chassis is handled deftly by a skilled crew on the assembly line of an Ohio truck manufacturer. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

The fine maneuvering qualities of the Army's halftrac scout car depends largely on the tractor belt. The mounting of the belt on the chassis is handled deftly by a skilled crew on the assembly line of an Ohio truck manufacturer. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Bags full of olive pulp in hydraulic presses for extraction of oil. The pulp is pressed two different times under differet degrees of pressure and this produces two distinct qualities of oil. Lindsay, California

Sonoma County, California. Champagne master tests champagne for dryness, flavor and other qualities at winery

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Testing for accuracy. Checking the straight-shooting qualities of one of the semi-automatic rifle which play an important role in our war preparation. Note the ejected cartridge flying through the air in the upper right hand corner of the photograph

Production. Milling machines and machine castings. The cupolas spout. As the molten iron pours from the cupola, a special ingredient is added through the pipe and funnel shown here -- one which helps to give the cast iron special qualities which have been predetermined by careful research and constant check-up. Site: a large Midwest machine tool foundry

High school Victory Corps. In order to provide training in teamwork, mental and physical coordination and to give opportunites for development of leadership qualities, one of the objectives of the High School Victory Corps is voluntary military drill. These students at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles, California, belong to the girl's dress team

High school Victory Corps. In order to provide training in teamwork, mental and physical coordination and to give opportunites for development of leadership qualities, one of the objectives of the High School Victory Corps is voluntary military drill. These students at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles, California, belong to the girl's dress team

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. Testing the fire-resistant qualities of various types of wood impregnations and coatings by the use of the firetube. Mr. Arthur Van Kleek, in charge of the work, is taking the readings

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Testing seeds for germinating qualities at the W. Atlee Burpee Company, seed dealers

Dehydration. Potatoes. A tray of sliced potatoes is placed on the steam blancher by Horace Campbell, chief of the Vegetable Section at the Western Regional Research Laboratory in Albany, California. Four to five minutes of blanching are necessary to inactivate enzymes which are harmful to the keeping qualities of the dehydrated product

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Testing seeds for germinating qualities at the W. Atlee Burpee Company, seed dealers. A number of seeds are placed in the folds of the blotting paper which is kept at a given temperature for a certain length of time. The number of sprouting seeds is then counted

Investigation of Flying Qualities on the Lockheed P-80A airplane plan view Note: Used in publication in Flight Research at Ames; 57 Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology ARC-1948-A-13091

3/4 FRONT VIEW OF HILLER H-23C (USA 56-2288). USE OF THE HILLER H-23 HELICOPTER AS AN AID IN ESTABLISHING SATISFACTORY FLYING QUALITIES & REQUIREMENTS FOR VTOL AIRCRAFT. Rotocraft Research. NASA SP Flight Research at Ames: 57 Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology ARC-1969-A-27425

The Boeing Vertol advanced Canadian CH-147 Chinook helicopter has been delivered to the U.S. Army for the Canadian Department of National Defense. The Canadian armed forces ordered eight of these aircraft which represent significant advances in flying qualities, payload and long range rescue capabilities

A right rear view of Skytrain 500, a 164-foot British-built airship undergoing tests at the center. The Naval Air Development Center is sponsoring the test project to determine if airships offer a practical military value to the Navy. NATC is evaluating the airship's flying qualities, performance, and vulnerability to radar

A right side view of Skytrain 500, a 164-foot British-built airship, during a flight near the center. The Naval Air Development Center is sponsoring the test project to determine if airships offer a practical, military value to the Navy. NATC is evaluating the airship's flying qualities, performance, and vulnerability to radar

A left side view of Skytrain 500, a 164-foot British-built airship undergoing tests at the center. The Naval Air Development Center is sponsoring the test project to determine if airships offer a practical military value to the Navy. NATC is evaluating the airship's flying qualities, performance, and vulnerability to radar

A right side view of Skytrain 500, a 164-foot British-built airship undergoing tests at the center. The Naval Air Development Center is sponsoring the test project to determine if airships offer a practical, military value to the Navy. NATC is evaluating the airship's flying qualities, performance, and vulnerability to radar

A rear view of Skytrain 500, a 164-foot British-built airship undergoing tests at the center. The Naval Air Development Center is sponsoring the test project to determine if airships offer a practical military value to the Navy. NATC is evaluating the airship's flying qualities, performance, and vulnerability to radar

A left side view of Skytrain 500, a 164-foot British-built airship, during a flight near the center. The Naval Air Development Center is sponsoring the test project to determine if airships offer a practical, military value to the Navy. NATC is evaluating the airship's flying qualities, performance, and vulnerability to radar

An inflight overview of the B-2 Bomber on its fifth test flight. The flight lasted one hour and seventeen minutes. Northrop CHIEF Test Pilot Bruce Hinds and Air Force LT. COL. John Small of the B-2 Combined Test Force were at the controls. The first five test flights were designed to expand the flight envelope, demonstrate the handling qualities of the aircraft while flying in the air refueling position and validate the proper function of the aircraft's subsystems

An overview in-flight image of the B-2 Bomber in its fifth test flight. The flight lasted one hour and seventeen minutes. Northrop CHIEF Test Pilot Bruce Hinds and Air Force LT. COL. John Small of the B-2 Combined Test Force were at the controls. The first five test flights were designed to expand the flight envelope, demonstrate the handling qualities of the aircraft while flying in the air refueling position and validate the proper function of the aircraft's subsystems

During the B-2's fifth test flight it is being refueled by a KC-10. The flight lasted one hour and seventeen minutes. Northrop chief test pilot Bruce Hinds and AIr Force LT. COL. John Small of the B-2 Combined Test Force were at the controls. The test flights were designed to expand the flight envelope, demonstrate the handling qualities of the aircraft while flying in the air refueling position and validate the proper fuction of the aircraft' s subsystems

Randy Halstead, ginseng buyer, discussing the qualities that make ginseng desirable

Scenic Byway 12 - Featuring the Qualities of Scenic Byway 12

A Cabeza Prieta National Refuge environmentalists (Left) assists US Air Force Technical Sergeant Crider and Lieutenant Hyden in collecting darts and excess material from the refuge. The Air Force is exploring methods to remove jettisoned training darts in an effort to restore wilderness qualities in the refuge

US Air Force Major Monroe, a member of the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron shovels dirt to try and remove a dart from the Cabeza Prieta Wildlife Refuge. The Air Force is exploring methods to remove jettisoned training darts in an effort to restore wilderness qualities at the refuge

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis down the runway at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC-00pp0602

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis down the runway at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC00pp0602

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC00pp0604

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC-00pp0604

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC-00pp0603

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) soars into the blue sky above Kennedy Space Center. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC-00pp0601

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) soars into the blue sky above Kennedy Space Center. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC00pp0601

A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulfstream II executive jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. It is used by Shuttle flight crews to practice landing the orbiter. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. The orbiter differs in at least one major aspect from conventional aircraft; it is unpowered during re-entry and landing so its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time there is no go-around capability. The orbiter touchdown speed is 213 to 226 miles (343 to 364 kilometers) per hour. There are two STAs, based in Houston KSC00pp0603

Scenic Byway 12 - The Qualities of Scenic Byway 12, Utah's All-American Road.

How differential deflection of the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps affected the handling qualities of this modified F/A-18A was evaluated during the first check flight in the Active Aeroelastic Wing program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. EC02-0264-19

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis to the runway with the STS-121 pilot and commander in the cockpit for practice flights. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1073

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly gets ready for a training flight in a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He will be practicing landing the orbiter using the STA, which is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1070

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) waits for the STS-121 pilot and commander to begin their practice flights. The STA is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1072

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey gets ready for a training flight in a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He will be practicing landing the orbiter using the STA, which is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1071

The Honorable Donald H. Rumsfeld, U.S. Secretary of Defense, speaks during the presentation ceremony of the Gerald R. Ford medal for Distinguished Public Service held at the National Archives in Washington, District of Columbia, on June 19, 2006. This award is presented to five U.S. military service members, each representing their respective service, in recognition for their outstanding public contributions that reflect the qualities demonstrated by President Ford during his public service career. These qualities are: strength of character, integrity, trustworthiness, fidelity to principles in decision making, sound judgment, decisiveness, determination, diligence, self-confidence...

The Honorable Donald H. Rumsfeld, U.S. Secretary of Defense, speaks during the presentation ceremony of the Gerald R. Ford medal for Distinguished Public Service held at the National Archives in Washington, District of Columbia, on June 19, 2006. This award is presented to five U.S. military service members, each representing their respective service, in recognition for their outstanding public contributions that reflect the qualities demonstrated by President Ford during his public service career. These qualities are: strength of character, integrity, trustworthiness, fidelity to principles in decision making, sound judgment, decisiveness, determination, diligence, self-confidence...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the pre-dawn hours, STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly heads across the Shuttle Landing Facility to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1257

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - As dawn washes the sky in pink, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is ready for his first flight in the Shuttle Training Aircraft today to practice landing a shuttle in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1263

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early dawn, STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly is ready for takeoff from the Shuttle Training Facility to practice landing a shuttle in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1264

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is ready for takeoff from the Shuttle Landing Facility. Lindsey and Pilot Mark Kelly will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1262

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly takes control in the cockpit. Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1260

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the pre-dawn hours, STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly (left) and Commander Steven Lindsey look at the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) they will be flying to practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1258

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey settles into his seat in the cockpit. Lindsey and Pilot Mark Kelly will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1259

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly is ready for takeoff from the Shuttle Landing Facility. Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1261

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the pre-dawn hours, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey walks across the Shuttle Landing Facility to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). Lindsey and Pilot Mark Kelly will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1256

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson will practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1913

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Commander Brent Jett is helped donning his launch suit before flying the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1905

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Under cloudy skies at sunset, T-38 jet aircraft are lined up on the NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility where STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson will be climbing aboard the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1907

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson settles in the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1910

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett boards the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1908

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Commander Brent Jett is seen at the controls of the Shuttle Training Aircraft which he will fly to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1911

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Commander Brent Jett settles in the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1909

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson is helped donning his launch suit before flying the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 27. The crew will deliver and install the P3/P4 segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the International Space Station. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. The mission is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1906

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Commander Brent Jett dons his launch suit before flying the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2022

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett leaves the Shuttle Training Aircraft after a practice session of landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2036

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson boards the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2026

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson disembarks from the Shuttle Training Aircraft after a practice session of landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2035

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2031

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2031
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2031

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson settles in the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2029

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2033

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2033
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) taxis into the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2033

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) is positioned in the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. The space shuttle's Mate-Demate Device is seen in the background. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2034

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) is positioned in the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. The space shuttle's Mate-Demate Device is seen in the background. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2034
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) is positioned in the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. The space shuttle's Mate-Demate Device is seen in the background. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2034

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson is dressed in his launch suit before flying the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2024

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Commander Brent Jett is dressed in his launch suit before flying the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2023

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett boards the Shuttle Training Aircraft to practice landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2025