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Extinguisher fire powder.

Extinguisher fire powder.

Extinguisher fire safety.

Extinguisher fire safety.

Caution rattlesnakes rattlesnake warning.

Caution rattlesnakes rattlesnake warning.

During the spring months, the ARC anticipating the danger of typhus and other contagious diseases, kept prepared several tents for the purpose of isolating any case that might be found This proved to be a wise precaution, and thanks to such effective means as this, all epidemics were successfully kept down on the Isle of Chios. The above picture shows an isolation ward maintained at Chios. The Red Cross had two such wards, supervised by the American Womens Hospitals.

During the spring months, the ARC anticipating the danger of typhus and other contagious diseases, kept prepared several tents for the purpose of isolating any case that might be found This proved to be a wise precaution, and thanks to such effective means as this, all epidemics were successfully kept down on the Isle of Chios. The above picture shows an isolation ward maintained at Chios. The Red Cross had two such wards, supervised by the American Womens Hospitals.

Palestine events. The 1929 riots, August 23 to 31. Troops and machine guns at Jaffa Gate on following Neby Mousa [i.e., Nebi Musa] celebration. Precaution against arrival of Hebron crowds

Palestine events. The 1929 riots, August 23 to 31. Troops and machine guns at Jaffa Gate on following Neby Mousa [i.e., Nebi Musa] celebration. Precaution against arrival of Hebron crowds

Decontamination activity. A.R.P. (air raid precaution) in Jerusalem. A.R.P. demonstration by Major A.D. Spark on the Y.M.C.A. sports field in Jerusalem

Decontamination activity. A.R.P. (air raid precaution) in Jerusalem. A.R.P. demonstration by Major A.D. Spark on the Y.M.C.A. sports field in Jerusalem

Decontamination activity. A.R.P. (air raid precaution) in Jerusalem. A.R.P. demonstration by Major A.D. Spark on the Y.M.C.A. sports field in Jerusalem

Decontamination activity. A.R.P. (air raid precaution) in Jerusalem. A.R.P. demonstration by Major A.D. Spark on the Y.M.C.A. sports field in Jerusalem

A Coast Guard motor lifeboat provides escort to San Francisco's crab fishermen as a wartime precaution. This naval protection includes taking the fleet to the fishing grounds at dawn, remaining with it through the fishing hours and finally bringing it home through the Golden Gate in the late afternoon

A Coast Guard motor lifeboat provides escort to San Francisco's crab fishermen as a wartime precaution. This naval protection includes taking the fleet to the fishing grounds at dawn, remaining with it through the fishing hours and finally bringing it home through the Golden Gate in the late afternoon

Air raid protection--what to do in your home. This is not the way to spend the evening, but simply a handy place to go if bombs suddenly start falling nearby. A heavy, sturdy table will not only keep off falling plaster that may be shaken down by a nearby burst, but would even help to support beams if the upper stories should come down. A shelter such as this will give the rescue squads a chance to save you. One precaution: keep that table away from the window

Air raid protection--what to do in your home. This is not the way to spend the evening, but simply a handy place to go if bombs suddenly start falling nearby. A heavy, sturdy table will not only keep off falling plaster that may be shaken down by a nearby burst, but would even help to support beams if the upper stories should come down. A shelter such as this will give the rescue squads a chance to save you. One precaution: keep that table away from the window

Air raid protection--what to do in your home. This is not the way to spend the evening, but simply a handy place to go if bombs suddenly start falling nearby. A heavy, sturdy table will not only keep off falling plaster that may be shaken down by a nearby burst, but would even help to support beams if the upper stories should come down. A shelter such as this will give the rescue squads a chance to save you. One precaution: keep that table away from the window

Air raid protection--what to do in your home. This is not the way to spend the evening, but simply a handy place to go if bombs suddenly start falling nearby. A heavy, sturdy table will not only keep off falling plaster that may be shaken down by a nearby burst, but would even help to support beams if the upper stories should come down. A shelter such as this will give the rescue squads a chance to save you. One precaution: keep that table away from the window

Testing the finished tube before packing. Fully inflated, every tube is tested by immersion in water before being dried, and packed for shipment. Rarely do workers find an imperfect tube, but this extra precaution is taken in every instance--just in case. Firestone (General) Tires, Akron, Ohio

Testing the finished tube before packing. Fully inflated, every tube is tested by immersion in water before being dried, and packed for shipment. Rarely do workers find an imperfect tube, but this extra precaution is taken in every instance--just in case. Firestone (General) Tires, Akron, Ohio

Defense housing, Erie, Pennsylvania. A member of the Visiting Nurse Association pays a call to one of many young tenants of the defense trailer camp. High standards of sanitation are maintained, and every precaution is taken to guard against epidemic and disease

Defense housing, Erie, Pennsylvania. A member of the Visiting Nurse Association pays a call to one of many young tenants of the defense trailer camp. High standards of sanitation are maintained, and every precaution is taken to guard against epidemic and disease

Defense housing, Erie, Pennsylvania. A member of the Visiting Nurse Association pays a call to one of many young tenants of the defense trailer camp. High standards of sanitation are maintained, and every precaution is taken to guard against epidemic and disease

Defense housing, Erie, Pennsylvania. A member of the Visiting Nurse Association pays a call to one of many young tenants of the defense trailer camp. High standards of sanitation are maintained, and every precaution is taken to guard against epidemic and disease

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

A Coast Guard motor lifeboat provides escort to San Francisco's crab fishermen as a wartime precaution. This naval protection includes taking the fleet to the fishing grounds at dawn, remaining with it through the fishing hours and finally bringing it home through the Golden Gate in the late afternoon

A Coast Guard motor lifeboat provides escort to San Francisco's crab fishermen as a wartime precaution. This naval protection includes taking the fleet to the fishing grounds at dawn, remaining with it through the fishing hours and finally bringing it home through the Golden Gate in the late afternoon

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Production. Marine engines. A drilling operation on the crankshaft of a marine engine for the Navy. This workman in a Midwest plant can certify that every precaution is taken to assure the finest quality in every crankshaft produced. Continental Motors, Michigan

Production. Marine engines. A drilling operation on the crankshaft of a marine engine for the Navy. This workman in a Midwest plant can certify that every precaution is taken to assure the finest quality in every crankshaft produced. Continental Motors, Michigan

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Tennessee Valley Authority power and conservation. Fort Loudoun Dam construction. A workman on a cofferdam of the new Fort Loudoun Dam, furthest upstream of the TVA's main Tennessee River projects. Scheduled for closure and first storage of water early in 1943, this dam will create a 15,000-acre lake reaching fifty-five miles upstream to the city of Knoxville. The reservoir will have a useful storage capacity of 126,000 acre-feet. Power installation of 64,000 kilowatts is authorized, with a possible ultimate of 96,000 kilowatts. Note safety precaution in the form of a life preserver strapped to this worker

Production. Shell loading. Nonchalantly loading a two-ton "block buster" at a large Midwest plant. Every precaution is taken, but a certain stoicism is required for this job. The workmen fill each end of the bomb with TNT, delivered "hot," and the remaining spaces with amatol, a mixture of fifty percent ammonium hydrate and fifty percent TNT. Ravenna ordnance plant

Production. Shell loading. Nonchalantly loading a two-ton "block buster" at a large Midwest plant. Every precaution is taken, but a certain stoicism is required for this job. The workmen fill each end of the bomb with TNT, delivered "hot," and the remaining spaces with amatol, a mixture of fifty percent ammonium hydrate and fifty percent TNT. Ravenna ordnance plant

Local residents are transported to waiting ships and patrol craft during an evacuation of the island of Dominica. The evacuation is a precaution in the event of a possible volcanic eruption

Local residents are transported to waiting ships and patrol craft during an evacuation of the island of Dominica.  The evacuation is a precaution in the event of a possible volcanic eruption

Crash and salvage crewmen wearing proximity suits stand by an aircraft as a precaution during an engine start-up aboard the US Navy (USN) Nuclear-powered Aircraft Carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69)

Crash and salvage crewmen wearing proximity suits stand by an aircraft as a precaution during an engine start-up aboard the US Navy (USN) Nuclear-powered Aircraft Carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69)

Sand bags protect the entrance of the base exchange as a precaution against possible flooding on the base in the aftermath of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

Sand bags protect the entrance of the base exchange as a precaution against possible flooding on the base in the aftermath of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

Sand bags line the edge of the sidewalk along Fields Avenue just outside the main gate of Clark Air Base. The sand bags are in place as a precaution against possible flooding in the aftermath of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

Sand bags line the edge of the sidewalk along Fields Avenue just outside the main gate of Clark Air Base. The sand bags are in place as a precaution against possible flooding in the aftermath of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

A soldier assigned to the 50th Engineer Company, 1ST Platoon, Camp Laguardia, Republic of Korea, and elements of the 2-9 Infantry, Camp Casey, ROK, rest after building a pontoon bridge on the Imjin River, ROK, for a simulated bridge building training exercise on Oct. 22, 1998. As a safety precaution their pant legs have been debloused to allow water drainage in the event they were to fall into the river

A soldier assigned to the 50th Engineer Company, 1ST Platoon, Camp Laguardia, Republic of Korea, and elements of the 2-9 Infantry, Camp Casey, ROK, rest after building a pontoon bridge on the Imjin River, ROK, for a simulated bridge building training exercise on Oct. 22, 1998. As a safety precaution their pant legs have been debloused to allow water drainage in the event they were to fall into the river

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour's replacement main engine No. 3 is moved underneath the orbiter for installation. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch at 1:11 p.m. EST Jan. 13, 2000, on mission STS-99. It will be Endeavour's 14th flight. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99padig040

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour's replacement main engine No. 3 is moved underneath the orbiter for installation. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch at 1:11 p.m. EST Jan. 13, 2000, on mission STS-99. It will be Endeavour's 14th flight. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99padig040

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building move orbiter Endeavour's main engine No. 3 (in front) out of the way before moving the replacement engine into place. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch on mission STS-99 on Jan. 13, 2000, at 1:11 p.m. EST. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99pp1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building move orbiter Endeavour's main engine No. 3 (in front) out of the way before moving the replacement engine into place. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch on mission STS-99 on Jan. 13, 2000, at 1:11 p.m. EST. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99pp1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This close-up of Space Shuttle Endeavour's main engines shows the replacement for main engine No. 3 (lower right) ready to be installed. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch at 1:11 p.m. EST Jan. 13, 2000, on mission STS-99. It will be Endeavour's 14th flight. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99padig041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This close-up of Space Shuttle Endeavour's main engines shows the replacement for main engine No. 3 (lower right) ready to be installed. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch at 1:11 p.m. EST Jan. 13, 2000, on mission STS-99. It will be Endeavour's 14th flight. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99padig041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building move orbiter Endeavour's replacement main engine No. 3 onto a work stand to prepare it for installation in the orbiter. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch on mission STS-99 on Jan. 13, 2000, at 1:11 p.m. EST. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99pp1401

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building move orbiter Endeavour's replacement main engine No. 3 onto a work stand to prepare it for installation in the orbiter. Following routine testing procedures on a separate test engine, analysis revealed delamination on the wall of the engine's main combustion chamber. When data revealed that one of Endeavour's engines had undergone similar testing procedures, managers opted to replace the suspect engine as a precaution. Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for launch on mission STS-99 on Jan. 13, 2000, at 1:11 p.m. EST. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission KSC-99pp1401

A P-23 crash truck monitors the KC-135s parked on the Alpha ramp at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, on April 11, 2000. The firetruck is a safety precaution in case of emergency during the alert response exercise which was occuring on the ramp. The base is continuing its participation in an Operational Readiness Inspection

A P-23 crash truck monitors the KC-135s parked on the Alpha ramp at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, on April 11, 2000. The firetruck is a safety precaution in case of emergency during the alert response exercise which was occuring on the ramp. The base is continuing its participation in an Operational Readiness Inspection

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC00pp1043

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC00pp1043

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1042

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1042

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1043

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1043

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC00pp1042

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC00pp1042

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC00pp1041

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC00pp1041

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1041

The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1041

Cranes place the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, on a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The truss had been temporarily stored in the RLV hangar in the background as a precaution against approaching bad weather. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1044

Cranes place the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, on a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The truss had been temporarily stored in the RLV hangar in the background as a precaution against approaching bad weather. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station’s radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency KSC-00pp1044

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handler) Third Class Sherwin Demeterio paints a red and yellow visual landing aid marking as a safety precaution around an elevator on the flight deck of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). TRUMAN is on station in the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation SOUTHERN WATCH. SOUTHERN WATCH establishes a southern no fly zone over Iraq and extends to the borders to just south of Baghdad, capital city of Iraq

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handler) Third Class Sherwin Demeterio paints a red and yellow visual landing aid marking as a safety precaution around an elevator on the flight deck of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). TRUMAN is on station in the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation SOUTHERN WATCH. SOUTHERN WATCH establishes a southern no fly zone over Iraq and extends to the borders to just south of Baghdad, capital city of Iraq

A Morningside, Maryland, police officer helps direct traffic into Andrews AFB, on September 11, 2001. Note that the officer is carrying a gas mask in its pouch. The traffic jam and gas mask precaution is a result of the terrorist attack on the Pentagon initiating a lock down and inspection of all vehicles entering the base

A Morningside, Maryland, police officer helps direct traffic into Andrews AFB, on September 11, 2001. Note that the officer is carrying a gas mask in its pouch. The traffic jam and gas mask precaution is a result of the terrorist attack on the Pentagon initiating a lock down and inspection of all vehicles entering the base

AIRMAN First Class Craig Hand, 568th Security Forces Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, directs vehicles at the west gate as a precaution during Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta) at Ramstein Air Base, Germany 12 September 2001. The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

AIRMAN First Class Craig Hand, 568th Security Forces Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, directs vehicles at the west gate as a precaution during Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta) at Ramstein Air Base, Germany 12 September 2001. The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

SENIOR AIRMAN Melissa Ray, 86th Security Forces Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, checks identification and cars as people come through the west gate as a precaution for Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta) at Ramstein Air Base, Germany 12 September 2001. The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

SENIOR AIRMAN Melissa Ray, 86th Security Forces Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, checks identification and cars as people come through the west gate as a precaution for Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta) at Ramstein Air Base, Germany 12 September 2001. The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

AIRMAN Warren Jennings, 568th Security Forces Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, checks individual identification and cars as people come through the west gate as part of Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta). The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

AIRMAN Warren Jennings, 568th Security Forces Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, checks individual identification and cars as people come through the west gate as part of Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta). The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

Traffic is backed up for up to 4 hours outside Ramstein Air Base's West Gate as 568th Security Forces Squadron carefully check identification and cars as people come through the gate as a precaution for Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta) at Ramstein Air Base, Germany 12 September 2001. The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

Traffic is backed up for up to 4 hours outside Ramstein Air Base's West Gate as 568th Security Forces Squadron carefully check identification and cars as people come through the gate as a precaution for Force Protection Condition Delta (FP CON Delta) at Ramstein Air Base, Germany 12 September 2001. The base is operating in FP CON Delta as a precaution after apparent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centers Twin Towers in New York and at the Pentagon, when hijackers deliberately flew civilian airliners into the buildings, on the morning of 11 September 2001

Members of the 1ST Battalion, 279th Infantry, Oklahoma National Guard, called in from a local field training exercise place their equipment and weapons on the parking lot of the 138th Fighter Wing, Oklahoma Air National Guard Base, Tulsa. The personnel assisted in stringing protective wire around a civilian-contractor construction site on the base as a precaution. The extra measure was initiated in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

Members of the 1ST Battalion, 279th Infantry, Oklahoma National Guard, called in from a local field training exercise place their equipment and weapons on the parking lot of the 138th Fighter Wing, Oklahoma Air National Guard Base, Tulsa. The personnel assisted in stringing protective wire around a civilian-contractor construction site on the base as a precaution. The extra measure was initiated in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Rob Alger, USAF, 138th Security Police Squadron, Oklahoma Air National Guard, checks drivers licenses and ID cards of personnel coming onto the base. This security precaution is in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Rob Alger, USAF, 138th Security Police Squadron, Oklahoma Air National Guard, checks drivers licenses and ID cards of personnel coming onto the base. This security precaution is in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

With extra armor precaution and armed with a 9 mm M9 pistol, State Security Officer, Casey Romijn checks the identification of an airman entering the Utah Air National Guard Base September 21, 2001, during Operation NOBLE EAGLE. The extra measure was initiated in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

With extra armor precaution and armed with a 9 mm M9 pistol, State Security Officer, Casey Romijn checks the identification of an airman entering the Utah Air National Guard Base September 21, 2001, during Operation NOBLE EAGLE. The extra measure was initiated in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

A US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine from 1ST Battalion, 7th Marines (1/7), Charlie Company, Twentynine Palms, California (CA), signals a driver as they park their vehicle off the road near Az Zubayr during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. The Marine is in Mission-Oriented Protective Posture response level 2 (MOPP-2) as a precaution on their way toward Baghdad

A US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine from 1ST Battalion, 7th Marines (1/7), Charlie Company, Twentynine Palms, California (CA), signals a driver as they park their vehicle off the road near Az Zubayr during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. The Marine is in Mission-Oriented Protective Posture response level 2 (MOPP-2) as a precaution on their way toward Baghdad

A US Army (USA) Soldier dons his Mission-Oriented Protective Posture response level Four (MOPP-4) gear, as a precaution to a suspected chemical attack in Iraq, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

A US Army (USA) Soldier dons his Mission-Oriented Protective Posture response level Four (MOPP-4) gear, as a precaution to a suspected chemical attack in Iraq, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) members of the 48th Security Forces Squadron (SFS), Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath, United Kingdom, respond to opposition forces inside a protective aircraft shelter during a Force On Force training exercise. The Airmen are armed 5.56 mm M16A2 rifles and wearing MCU-2P gas masks as a precaution. They are also wearing Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear. Force on Force is an annual exercise held at RAF Lakenheath to give a simulated, tactical scenario to real world missions. The exercise presents situations that might occur at the installation

US Air Force (USAF) members of the 48th Security Forces Squadron (SFS), Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath, United Kingdom, respond to opposition forces inside a protective aircraft shelter during a Force On Force training exercise. The Airmen are armed 5.56 mm M16A2 rifles and wearing MCU-2P gas masks as a precaution. They are also wearing Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear. Force on Force is an annual exercise held at RAF Lakenheath to give a simulated, tactical scenario to real world missions. The exercise presents situations that might occur at the installation

US Navy (USN) Boatswain's Mate Third Class (BM3) David Ennulat sets up life lines on board the USN Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) while steaming out of Truman Bay, Yokosuka, Japan (JPN) following a five-month ship's maintenance. The life lines run the perimeter of the ship as a safety precaution against the Sailors and equipment from falling overboard

US Navy (USN) Boatswain's Mate Third Class (BM3) David Ennulat sets up life lines on board the USN Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) while steaming out of Truman Bay, Yokosuka, Japan (JPN) following a five-month ship's maintenance. The life lines run the perimeter of the ship as a safety precaution against the Sailors and equipment from falling overboard

US Navy (USN) SEAMAN (SN) Gavin Takata and SN Roger Lewis rig lifelines aboard the USN Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63). Lifelines run the perimeter of the ship as a safety precaution to prevent Sailors and equipment from falling overboard

US Navy (USN) SEAMAN (SN) Gavin Takata and SN Roger Lewis rig lifelines aboard the USN Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63). Lifelines run the perimeter of the ship as a safety precaution to prevent Sailors and equipment from falling overboard

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A darkening cloud overhead keeps vigil as Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from Launch Pad 39B on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building. At right are the rotating and fixed service structures. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1982

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   A darkening cloud overhead keeps vigil as Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from Launch Pad 39B on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  At right are the rotating and fixed service structures.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1982

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1973

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    From Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1973

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Reeds muddle the reflection of Space Shuttle Atlantis in the pond next to Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle is rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1975

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Reeds muddle the reflection of Space Shuttle Atlantis in the pond next to Launch Pad 39B.  The shuttle is rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1975

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crawler-transporter underneath Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform begins rolling away from Launch Pad 39B, taking the shuttle back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06PD1971

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    The crawler-transporter underneath Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform begins rolling away from Launch Pad 39B, taking the shuttle back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06PD1971

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The camera captures an optical illusion of a dragonfly above the reedy water near Launch Pad 39B seems to be heading for Space Shuttle Atlantis. The shuttle, sitting on the mobile launcher platform, is being moved off the pad by the crawler-transporter and rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1984

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The camera captures an optical illusion of a dragonfly above the reedy water near Launch Pad 39B seems to be heading for Space Shuttle Atlantis.  The shuttle, sitting on the mobile launcher platform, is being moved off the pad by the crawler-transporter and rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1984

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from across pond near Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis is framed by tree limbs as it begins rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1972

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -     Viewed from across  pond near Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis is framed by tree limbs as it begins rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1972

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the rotating service structure has been rolled away from Space Shuttle Atlantis, sitting on the mobile launcher platform. The crawler-transporter, which has moved underneath, will lift and carry both back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away. Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1969

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   On Launch Pad 39B, the rotating service structure has been rolled away from Space Shuttle Atlantis, sitting on the mobile launcher platform.  The crawler-transporter, which has moved underneath, will lift and carry both back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away.  Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1969

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Engineers keep watch on the crawler-transporter as it carries Space Shuttle Atlantis and the mobile launcher platform back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1986

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Engineers keep watch on the crawler-transporter as it carries Space Shuttle Atlantis and the mobile launcher platform back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1986

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The massive mobile launcher platform and Space Shuttle Atlantis above it nearly dwarf the crawler-transporter below them. The crawler alone is 20 feet high. The crawler is moving the Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1979

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    The massive mobile launcher platform and Space Shuttle Atlantis above it nearly dwarf the crawler-transporter below them.  The crawler alone is 20 feet high.  The crawler is moving the Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1979

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from an upper level of the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion was at 10:04 a.m. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1970

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Viewed from an upper level of the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion was at 10:04 a.m.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1970

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the rotating service structure has been rolled away from Space Shuttle Atlantis, sitting on the mobile launcher platform. The crawler-transporter, which has moved underneath, will lift and carry both back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away. Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1968

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   On Launch Pad 39B, the rotating service structure has been rolled away from Space Shuttle Atlantis, sitting on the mobile launcher platform.  The crawler-transporter, which has moved underneath, will lift and carry both back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away.  Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1968

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter (below) begins rolling away with its cargo above of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform. The shuttle is rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1977

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter (below) begins rolling away with its cargo above of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform.  The shuttle is rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1977

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, a worker checks the progress of one of the corner bolts of the crawler-transporter that support the mobile launcher platform during transport. Space Shuttle Atlantis, which sits on top of the mobile launcher platform, will be rolled back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1976

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    On Launch Pad 39B, a worker checks the progress of one of the corner bolts of the crawler-transporter that support the mobile launcher platform during transport.  Space Shuttle Atlantis, which sits on top of the mobile launcher platform, will be rolled back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1976

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter moves Space Shuttle Atlantis along the ramp and away from the rotating and fixed service structures, at right, on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1985

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter moves Space Shuttle Atlantis along the ramp and away from the rotating and fixed service structures, at right, on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1985

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter moves Space Shuttle Atlantis away from the rotating and fixed service structures, at right, on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1981

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter moves Space Shuttle Atlantis away from the rotating and fixed service structures, at right, on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1981

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A serene scene surrounds Space Shuttle Atlantis as it begins rolling off Launch Pad 39B to return to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1980

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   A serene scene surrounds Space Shuttle Atlantis as it begins rolling off Launch Pad 39B to return to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1980

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from the NASA News Center across the turn basin in the Launch Complex 39 Area, Space Shuttle Atlantis continues its slow crawl toward the Vehicle Assembly Building from Launch Pad 39B. After this photo was taken, the decision was made to return the shuttle to the launch pad. The rollback was a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm was forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The revised forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1989

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Viewed from the NASA News Center across the turn basin in the Launch Complex 39 Area, Space Shuttle Atlantis continues its slow crawl toward the Vehicle Assembly Building from Launch Pad 39B. After this photo was taken, the decision was made to return the shuttle to the launch pad.  The rollback was a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm was forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.   The revised forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1989

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - One of the crawler engineers is seen inside the cab on the corner of the crawler transporter. The crawler is moving the Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1978

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    One of the crawler engineers is seen inside the cab on the corner of the crawler transporter.  The crawler is moving the Space Shuttle Atlantis and mobile launcher platform back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.   The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1978

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the rotating service structure has been rolled away from Space Shuttle Atlantis, sitting on the mobile launcher platform. The crawler-transporter, which has moved underneath, will lift and carry both back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away. Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1967

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   On Launch Pad 39B, the rotating service structure has been rolled away from Space Shuttle Atlantis, sitting on the mobile launcher platform.  The crawler-transporter, which has moved underneath, will lift and carry both back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away.  Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1967

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Moved by the crawler-transporter underneath, Space Shuttle Atlantis inches down the ramp from Launch Pad 39B as it rolls back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. At right is the rotating service structure in its open configuration and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1974

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Moved by the crawler-transporter underneath, Space Shuttle Atlantis inches down the ramp from Launch Pad 39B as it rolls back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. At right is the rotating service structure in its open configuration and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-06pd1974

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is reflected in the water near Launch Pad 39B. The rotating service structure has been rolled away in anticipation of the rollback of the shuttle and mobile launcher platform to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away. Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1966

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Space Shuttle Atlantis is reflected in the water near Launch Pad 39B.  The rotating service structure has been rolled away in anticipation of the rollback of the shuttle and mobile launcher platform to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), approximately 4 miles away.  Despite the clear blue skies, the rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd1966

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter moves Space Shuttle Atlantis along the ramp and away from the rotating and fixed service structures, at right, on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT. The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1983

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   On Launch Pad 39B, the crawler-transporter moves Space Shuttle Atlantis along the ramp and away from the rotating and fixed service structures, at right, on its rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion off the pad was at 10:04 a.m. EDT.  The crawler is 131 feet long, 113 feet wide and 20 feet high. It weights 5.5 million pounds unloaded. The combined weight of crawler, mobile launcher platform and a space shuttle is 12 million pounds. Unloaded, the crawler moves at 2 mph. Loaded, the snail's pace slows to 1 mph. The rollback is a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm is forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.  The shuttle will be moved into high bay 2, on the southwest side of the VAB, for protection from the storm.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1983

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis continues its slow crawl toward the Vehicle Assembly Building from Launch Pad 39B. The rollback was a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto. The storm was forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours. After this photo was taken, a revised forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1990

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Space Shuttle Atlantis continues its slow crawl toward the Vehicle Assembly Building from Launch Pad 39B. The rollback was a safety precaution as the area waits for the arrival of Tropical Storm Ernesto.  The storm was forecast to be bringing 58-mph to 70-mph winds in the next 24 hours.   After this photo was taken, a revised forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd1990

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A lightning strike on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is captured by an Operational Television camera. Eleven lightning strikes occurred within .35 miles of the pad during a thunderstorm July 10 as space shuttle Endeavour was prepared for launch. Mission managers decided to delay Endeavour's planned liftoff July 11 as a precaution to allow engineers and safety personnel time to analyze data and retest systems on the orbiter and solid rockets boosters. The next launch attempt for the STS-127 mission is planned for Sunday, July 12, at 7:13 p.m. EDT. The Operational Television cameras can be used to triangulate the location of lightning strikes. Other detection systems include the Cloud-To-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, Strikenet/National Lightning Detection Network, Lightning Induced Voltage Instrumentation System and the Catenary Wire Lightning Instrumentation System. Endeavour will deliver the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, in the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the International Space Station. STS-127 is the 29th flight for the assembly of the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Analex KSC-2009-3940

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A lightning strike on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is captured by an Operational Television camera.  Eleven lightning strikes occurred within .35 miles of the pad during a thunderstorm July 10 as space shuttle Endeavour was prepared for launch. Mission managers decided to delay Endeavour's planned liftoff July 11 as a precaution to allow engineers and safety personnel time to analyze data and retest systems on the orbiter and solid rockets boosters.  The next launch attempt for the STS-127 mission is planned for Sunday, July 12, at 7:13 p.m. EDT.  The Operational Television cameras can be used to triangulate the location of lightning strikes. Other detection systems include the Cloud-To-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, Strikenet/National Lightning Detection Network, Lightning Induced Voltage Instrumentation System and the Catenary Wire Lightning Instrumentation System.  Endeavour will deliver the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, in the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the International Space Station.  STS-127 is the 29th flight for the assembly of the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Analex KSC-2009-3940

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are Boeing technicians Richard Gillman and Steve Lay, and SDO technician Brian Kittle. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1049

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  From left are Boeing technicians Richard Gillman and Steve Lay, and SDO technician Brian Kittle.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1049

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are SDO technician Brian Kittle and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1052

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  From left are SDO technician Brian Kittle and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1052

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., test conductors from ASTROTECH and Kennedy Space Center monitor data received from the clean room as technicians sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1058

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., test conductors from ASTROTECH and Kennedy Space Center monitor data received from the clean room as technicians sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1058

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1056

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1056

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1053

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1053

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are Boeing technician Steve Lay and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1051

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  From left are Boeing technician Steve Lay and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1051

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., a team of Kennedy Space Center spacecraft fueling specialists and engineers monitors data received from the clean room as technicians sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1057

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., a team of Kennedy Space Center spacecraft fueling specialists and engineers monitors data received from the clean room as technicians sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1057

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare the equipment necessary to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1054

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare the equipment necessary to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1054

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1055

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1055

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are Boeing technician Steve Lay and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1050

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  From left are Boeing technician Steve Lay and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson.    The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft.  The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel.  Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch.  SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1050

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a security officer monitors the area after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1341

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a security officer monitors the area after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1341

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Workers wait to return to their buildings at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1339

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Workers wait to return to their buildings at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1339

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, KSC firefighters were on the scene after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1342

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, KSC firefighters were on the scene after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1342

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Workers wait to return to their buildings at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1340

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Workers wait to return to their buildings at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after a backhoe inadvertently struck a natural gas line at around 8:40 a.m. EST in the area north of the Multi Function Facility (MFF). As a precaution, personnel were evacuated from Orbiter Processing Facilities 1 and 2, the MFF, Processing Control Center and Operations Support Building (OSB) I. All traffic was blocked on the Saturn Causeway near the facilities. There were no injuries or damage to any facilities and personnel were allowed back into their buildings before mid-day and the roadway open to traffic. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-1340

Petal, Miss., Feb. 18, 2013 -- This weather radio is on at the Petal Disaster Recovery Center as a necessary safety precaution. FEMA advises anyone that lives in a part of the country that has any potential for severe weather events, keep such a radio on at all times. Photo by Marilee Caliendo/FEMA

Petal, Miss., Feb. 18, 2013 -- This weather radio is on at the Petal Disaster Recovery Center as a necessary safety precaution.  FEMA advises anyone that lives in a part of the country that has any potential for severe weather events, keep such a radio on at all times.  Photo by Marilee Caliendo/FEMA

Signs chinese honking.

Signs chinese honking.

Hand attention important point.

Hand attention important point.

Bucket water fire.

Bucket water fire.

Caution sign safety.

Caution sign safety.

Bucket water extinguish.

Bucket water extinguish.

Protection equipment mask.

Protection equipment mask.

Bucket water fire.

Bucket water fire.

Inspection of an Ontario Salt Mine | Inspection d’une mine de sel en Ontario

Inspection of an Ontario Salt Mine | Inspection d’une mine de sel en Ontario