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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment into the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station. The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1635

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane is ready to lift the Port 3/4 truss segment and move it to a payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station. The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1632

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment toward the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. On the right end are the mast canisters for the solar arrays. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station. The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1634

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The next element to be added to the International Space Station, the Port 3/4 truss segment is being moved to a payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The cylinders shown are the mast canisters for the solar arrays. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station. The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1631

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment into the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station. The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1636

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the Port 3/4 truss segment across the floor to the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station. The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1633

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The rotating service structure (left) on Launch Pad 39B is rolled back to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2039

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After rollback of the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis is revealed. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, extending from the fixed service structure, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2040

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The rotating service structure (left) on Launch Pad 39B begins rolling back to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2038

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After rollback of the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Atlantis shines in the late afternoon sun. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases a deluge of water across the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2045

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The rotating service structure (left) on Launch Pad 39B is ready to roll away from Space Shuttle Atlantis in preparation for launch. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2037

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Launch Pad 39B looks like a movie screen in this photo of Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the rotating service structure. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases a deluge of water across the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2042

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The late afternoon sun highlights Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the rotating service structure. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, extending from the fixed service structure, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2044

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The rotating service structure (left) on Launch Pad 39B is rolled back to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2043

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Early evening shadows glide across Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39B. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad and then is rolled away before liftoff. In the background is the Atlantic Ocean. Extended from the fixed service structure at left is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Atlantis is scheduled to launch Sept. 6 at 12:29 p.m. EDT on mission STS-115. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned KSC landing at about 8:03 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2053

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Huge clouds billow on the horizon behind Space Shuttle Atlantis still sitting on Launch Pad 39B after the scrub of its launch on mission STS-115. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. At left is the rolled-back rotating service structure with the payload changeout room open. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2056

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd2047

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Huge clouds roll over Launch Pad 39B where Space Shuttle Atlantis still sits after the scrub of its launch on mission STS-115. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2054

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2052

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS)  still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but  a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1.  Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch.  At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2052
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2052

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is in the spotlight on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd2046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds spread throughout the sky behind Launch Pad 39B where Space Shuttle Atlantis still sits after the scrub of its launch on mission STS-115. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2057

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd2048

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Huge clouds roll over Launch Pad 39B where Space Shuttle Atlantis still sits after the scrub of its launch on mission STS-115. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. At left is the rolled-back rotating service structure with the payload changeout room open. Just above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2055

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The sky is finally clear behind Launch Pad 39B where Space Shuttle Atlantis still sits after the scrub of its launch on mission STS-115. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Just above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below, the orbiter access arm extends toward the cockpit of Atlantis with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides access into the cockpit of the vehicle. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2051

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS)  still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but  a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1.  Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch.  At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2051
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2051

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd2049

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Storm clouds roll across Launch Pad 39B where Space Shuttle Atlantis still sits on the pad. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch Aug. 27, but a scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2066

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The lights on Launch Pad 39B paint columns of light in the water next to the pad where Space Shuttle Atlantis is illuminated. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch on Aug. 27, but a scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT Sept. 8. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2072

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is illuminated on Launch Pad 39B, surrounded by amber lights on the rotating and fixed service structures. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch on Aug. 27, but a scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT Sept. 8. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2073

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Seen in the photo is the lower parking lot for the NASA News Center where the media's vehicles and satellite trucks are situated the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2069

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Framed between the horizon and the clouds is Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39B. The flag in the foreground is at the NASA News Center, near the countdown clock. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2070

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Storm clouds fill the sky from Launch Pad 39B, at right, west beyond the Vehicle Assembly Building. Space Shuttle Atlantis still sits on the pad after a scrub was called Aug. 27 due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2067

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A heavy bank of storm clouds gather behind Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch Aug. 27, but a scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2065

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Storm clouds fill the sky behind the Vehicle Assembly Building on the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2068

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is illuminated on Launch Pad 39B, while amber lights on the fixed service structure give a surreal appearance. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Lower down, and next to Atlantis, is the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch on Aug. 27, but a scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT Sept. 8. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2074

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. In the foreground is the lower parking lot for the NASA News Center where the media's vehicles and satellite trucks are situated the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2071

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Storm clouds gather behind Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch on Aug. 27, but a scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with fuel cell 1. Towering above the shuttle is the 80-foot lightning mast. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2064

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett looks reflective as he suits up for launch before heading to the launch pad. Jett is making his fourth shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2084

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-115 crew members walk toward the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B. Seen left to right are Mission Specialists Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven MacLean, Joseph Tanner and Daniel Burbank; Pilot Christopher Ferguson; and Commander Brent Jett. This is the second attempt at launch after a week's postponement due to weather and technical concerns. Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT on this date from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2089

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner waits to complete suiting up before heading to the launch pad. Tanner is making his fourth shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2085

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper is helped with her launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad. Stefanyshyn-Piper is making her first shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2082

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Daniel Burbank adjusts his glove during suitup before heading to the launch pad. Burbank is making his second shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2081

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett dons his launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad. Jett is making his fourth shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2079

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Steven MacLean checks his glove during suitup before heading to the launch pad. MacLean is with the Canadian Space Agency. MacLean is making his second shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2080

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-115 crew members stride out of the Operations and Checkout Building eager to get to Launch Pad 39B and the start of their mission to the International Space Station. This is the second attempt at launch after a week's postponement due to weather and technical concerns. On the left side, front to back, are Pilot Christopher Ferguson and Mission Specialists Steven MacLean and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper. On the right side, front to back, are Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Daniel Burbank and Joseph Tanner. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2088

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson checks his helmet during suitup before heading to the launch pad. Ferguson is making his first shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2087

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After a week's delay of launching due to weather and technical issues, the crew of mission STS-115 enjoy the traditional breakfast before their second attempt to launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Pilot Christopher Ferguson, Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Steven MacLean and Daniel Burbank. MacLean is with the Canadian Space Agency. Following the breakfast, the crew will don their launch suits before heading to Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2075

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During suitup in the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Daniel Burbank tests the communication system in his helmet. Burbank is making his second shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2086

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson dons his launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad. Ferguson is making his first shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2078

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Steven MacLean dons his launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad. MacLean is with the Canadian Space Agency. MacLean is making his second shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2077

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-115 Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper waves during suitup in the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center. She is making her first shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2083

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner dons his launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad. Tanner is making his fourth shuttle flight on this mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. On its second attempt for launch, Atlantis is scheduled to lift off at 11:41 a.m. EDT today from Launch Pad 39B. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2076

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-115 mission crew respond to well-wishers as they head to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39B. From left are Pilot Christopher Ferguson, Mission Specialists Steven MacLean, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Daniel Burbank and Joseph Tanner (hidden), and Commander Brent Jett. The crew is eager for another attempt at liftoff after the Sept. 8 scrub. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2104

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fish-eye view curves the fixed service structure toward Space Shuttle Atlantis as it leaps off Launch Pad 39B, propelled by columns of fire from the solid rocket boosters. At the lower left is the White Room that, when extended against Atlantis, gave the mission crew access to the orbiter. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2150

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis hurtles toward space, propelled by twin columns of fire from the solid rocket boosters, which are captured in the reflection on the water. The resulting clouds of smoke and steam billow across Launch Pad 39B and upward, obscuring the service structures on the pad. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2158

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Steven MacLean dons his helmet to complete suiting up for another attempt at liftoff. MacLean is with the Canadian Space Agency. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2095

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flaming rockets propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into the sky, blocking the sun, for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Appearing below the main engine nozzles s are the blue mach diamonds signal the speed and force at which Atlantis roars into space. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2145

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner dons his launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. Liftoff today is scheduled for 11:15 a.m. EDT. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2091

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Twin columns of fire propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into a clear blue sky after liftoff from Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2149

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Twin columns of fire propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into a clear blue sky after liftoff from Launch Pad 39B. At left is the fixed service structure, topped by the lightning mast. Clouds of smoke and steam nearly obscure the pad. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2153

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During suitup in the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner signals a "go" for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2103

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flaming rockets propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into the sky for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo courtesy of Nikon/Scott Andrews KSC-06pd2116

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A phalanx of photographers line the roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building as Space Shuttle Atlantis roars off the launch pad at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2115

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis into the deep blue sky is reflected in the nearby water framed by the green underbrush. Clouds of smoke and steam spread side to side across Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2157

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the White Room on Launch Pad 39B, STS-115 Mission Specialist Steven MacLean adjusts his launch suit while talking with the closeout crew. MacLean, who represents the Canadian Space Agency, is making his second shuttle flight. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the White Room on Launch Pad 39B, STS-115 Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper gets help with her launch suit from the closeout crew before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis. Piper is making her first shuttle flight. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2162

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A view of the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115 as it soars over the Space Coast, taken from NASA's WB-57 aircraft. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station, delivering the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment for installation. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: Courtesy of Robert Rivers KSC-06pd2466

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After suiting up, the STS-115 mission crew enthusiastically greet the onlookers as they head to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39B. From left are Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven MacLean, Joseph Tanner, Pilot Christopher Ferguson and Daniel Burbank. Not seen is Commander Brent Jett. The crew is eager for another attempt at liftoff after the Sept. 8 scrub. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2107

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Pilot Christopher Ferguson adjusts his glove during suitup before heading to the launch pad for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2099

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Through a slight haze of clouds, Space Shuttle Atlantis hurtles toward space for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2120

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper is donning her launch and re-entry suit before heading to the launch pad for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2094

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis appears to spring out of the shrubbery near Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2154

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Steven MacLean signals "go" for another attempt at liftoff. MacLean is with the Canadian Space Agency. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2092

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialist Daniel Burbank gets a final adjustment on his helmet before heading to the launch pad for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2097

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-115 mission crew happily heads to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39B and another attempt at liftoff. From the left, in the back row are Mission Specialists Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper and Joseph Tanner; in the center row are Mission Specialists Steven MacLean and Daniel Burbank; in the front row leading the way are Pilot Christopher Ferguson and Commander Brent Jett. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2105

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Nearly obscured by its own contrail, Space Shuttle Atlantis hurtles toward space for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2121

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Hurtling toward space, Space Shuttle Atlantis clears the lightning mast atop the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Clouds of smoke and steam nearly obscure the pad. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. KSC-06pp2152

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fish-eye view curves the fixed service structure toward Space Shuttle Atlantis as it hurtles past, propelled by columns of fire from the solid rocket boosters. Below, the smoke and steam billows across Launch Pad 39B. At the lower left is the White Room that, when extended against Atlantis, gave the mission crew access to the orbiter. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2151

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flaming rockets propel Space Shuttle Atlantis away from the smoke and steam below and into the sky for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph & Robert Murray KSC-06pd2126

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis hurtles toward space, propelled by twin columns of fire from the solid rocket boosters. Clouds of smoke and steam spread side to side across Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Twin columns of fire from the solid rocket boosters hurl Space Shuttle Atlantis off Launch Pad 39B into the sky for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Clouds of smoke and steam spread across the pad and the fixed service structure at left, topped by the lightning mast. Atlantis is heading for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2156

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After suiting up, the STS-115 mission crew exits the Operations and Checkout Building to board the Astrovan to Launch Pad 39B. On the left, front to back, are Pilot Christopher Ferguson and Mission Specialists Steven MacLean and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper. On the right, front to back, are Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Daniel Burbank and Joseph Tanner. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2106

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - With applause and cheers from the onlookers, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars off the launch pad for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. In the foreground is the countdown clock, marking launch and mission-elapsed time, on the grounds of the NASA News Center. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Debbie Odom KSC-06pd2110

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis leaps off the launch pad past the lightning mast on top of the fixed service structure at left. Atlantis is heading for space and its rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several earlier launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo courtesy of Nikon/Scott Andrews KSC-06pd2131

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Commander Brent Jett signals a "go" for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2098

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flaming rockets propel Space Shuttle Atlantis off Launch Pad 39B for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. In the background is the Atlantic Ocean. Appearing above the nose of the orbiter is the end of the gaseous vent line that leads from the hood, or beanie cap, which has been moved away from the shuttle for liftoff. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2147

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - With a fiery liftoff, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars off the launch pad for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Dennis Sabo KSC-06pd2111

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Commander Brent Jett finishes suiting up for another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2101

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the White Room on Launch Pad 39B, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett gets help with his launch suit from the closeout crew before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis. Jett is making his fourth shuttle flight. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. KSC-06pp2159

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis appears enveloped in the smoke and steam created at liftoff from Launch Pad 39B. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. Atlantis is heading for space and its rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph & Robert Murray KSC-06pd2125

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flaming rockets propel Space Shuttle Atlantis away from the smoke and steam below and into the sky for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2119

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Trailing fire and a plume of smoke, Space Shuttle Atlantis leaves a dance of lights on nearby water as it hurtles toward space for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2148

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The primitiveness of the dunes (foreground) clash with the technology exhibited in the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis for its rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph & Robert Murray KSC-06pd2123

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis roars off the launch pad for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. In the foreground are only a few of the hundreds of photographers capturing the historic scene from the grounds of the NASA News Center. Just beyond them is the countdown clock, marking launch and mission-elapsed time. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-06pd2108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the sky above the primitive sand dunes in the foreground. Heading for its rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115, liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph & Robert Murray KSC-06pd2124

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper pose while suiting up for the ride to Launch Pad 39B and another attempt at liftoff. The launch attempt on Sept. 8 was scrubbed due to an issue with a fuel cut-off sensor system inside the external fuel tank. This is one of several systems that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown if fuel runs unexpectedly low. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2100

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flaming rockets propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into the sky or a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. Appearing below the main engine nozzles s are the blue mach diamonds signal the speed and force at which Atlantis roars into space. Below Atlantis' tail are pieces of ice dislodged during the launch. Liftoff was on-time at 11:14:55 a.m. EDT. After several launch attempts were scrubbed due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. Mission STS-115 is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC KSC-06pp2146

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking like a work of art, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the blue Florida sky atop a column of fire for a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-115. After launch attempts were scrubbed Aug. 27 and 29 and Sept. 3 and 8 due to weather and technical concerns, this launch was executed perfectly. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the ISS. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Dennis Sabo KSC-06pd2112