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James Poindexter to David Yancey, September 11, 1807. Certification.

James Poindexter

Miles Poindexter seated at desk

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

M. Poindexter

Poindexter, Jasper - Sixth Cavalry (65th State Troops)

POINDEXTER, MILES. SENATOR

POINDEXTER, MILES. SENATOR

Sea Girt Tyro winners seated on steps - A.M. Poindexter, G.W. Kisner, G.J. Nordell, 2nd troop N.J.N.G.

Every one of these youngsters went into work when the whistle blew, noon June 15, 1911, in the Chesapeake Knitting Mills, Berkley, Va. See also photos and labels 2245 to 2249. Following are some of their names; (youngest refused to give names) - - Otto, Lowe, 78 Seaboard Ave. Finishing Room. D.M. Deschields, 25 Phillip St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Oscar Weston, 1320 Berkley Ave., Totes work. Lonnie Wommack, Hawthorn Ave. So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Jack Harrell, 66 Perry St., So. Norfolk, Finishing Room. Waverley Roseberry, 250 St. James St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room, Charlie McHorney, 4 Poindexter St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Location: Berkley, Virginia.

Every one of these youngsters went into work when the whistle blew, noon June 15, 1911, in the Chesapeake Knitting Mills, Berkley, Va. See also photos and labels 2245 to 2249. Following are some of their names; (youngest refused to give names): Otto Lowe, 78 Seaboard Ave. Finishing Room. D.M. Deschields, 25 Phillip St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Oscar Weston 1320 Berkley Ave. Totes work. Lonnie Wommack, Hawthorn Ave. So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Jack Harrell, 66 Perry St., So. Norfolk, Finishing Room. Waverley Roseberry, 250 St. James St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Charlie McHorney, 4 Poindexter St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Location: Berkley, Virginia.

These boys, and others, work in the Chesapeake Knitting Mills, Berkley, Va. See also photos and label 2245 to 2249. Following are some of their names; - (the youngest refused to give names): Otto, Lowe, 78 Seaboard Ave. Finishing Room. D. M. Deschields, 25 Phillip St. So, Norfolk, Winding Room. Oscar Westo[n] 1320 Berkley Ave. Totes work. Lonnie Wommack, Hawthorn Ave. So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Jack Harrell, 66 Perry St., So. Norfolk, Finishing Room. Waverley Roseberry, 250 St. James St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Charlie McHorney, 4 Poindexter St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Location: Berkley, Virginia.

Every one of these youngsters went into work when the whistle blew, noon June 15, 1911, in the Chesapeake Knitting Mills, Berkley, Va. See also photos and labels 2245 to 2249. Following are some of their names; (youngest refused to give names): Otto, Lowe, 78 Seaboard Ave. Finishing Room. D.M. Deschields, 25 Phillip St. So, Norfolk, Winding Room. Oscar Weston, 1320 Berkley Ave. Totes work. Lonnie Wommack, Hawthorn Ave., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Jack Harrell, 66 Perry St., So. Norfolk, Finishing Room. Waverley Roseberry, 250 St. James St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Charlie McHorney, 4 Poindexter St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Location: Berkley, Virginia.

Every one of these youngsters went into work when the whistle blew, noon June 15, 1911. These boys and others work in the Chesapeake Knitting Mills, Berkley, Va. See also photos and labels 2245 to 2249. Following are some of their names; (youngest refused to give names): Otto, Lowe, 78 Seaboard Ave. Finishing Room. D.M. Deschields, 25 Phillip St., So, Norfolk, Winding Room. Oscar WestoN, 1320 Berkley Ave., Totes work. Lonnie Wommack, Hawthorn Ave., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Jack Harrell, 66 Perry St., So. Norfolk, Finishing Room. Waverley Roseberry, 250 St. James St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Charlie McHorney, 4 Poindexter St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Location: Berkley, Virginia.

These boys, and others, work in the Chesapeake Knitting Mills, Berkley, Va. See also photos and label 2245 to 2249. Following are some of their names: (the youngest refused to give names). Otto, Lowe, 78 Seaboard Ave. Finishing Room. D. M. Deschields, 25 Phillip St. So, Norfolk, Winding Room. Oscar Weston 1320 Berkley Ave. Totes work. Lonnie Wommack, Hawthorn Ave. So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Jack Harrell, 66 Perry St., So. Norfolk, Finishing Room. Waverley Roseberry, 250 St. James St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room, Charlie McHorney, 4 Poindexter St., So. Norfolk, Winding Room. Location: Berkley, Virginia.

John Poindexter, "I'm ten years old. Helps me mommy in the spoolin' room every day," (Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C.) Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

[Miles Poindexter posing for photographers at U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C.]

Poindexter [i.e., Miles Poindexter, with photographers. U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C.]

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Mrs. Miles Poindexter

Mrs. Poindexter

Mrs. Poindexter

[Miles Poindexter, three-quarter length portrait, seated at desk, facing left]

James Poindexter; Pioneer Baptist preacher in Ohio.

Miles Poindexter, U.S. Minister to Peru

Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter

Poindexter & Pezet, [3/1/23]

Vice Admiral (VADM) John M. Poindexter, USN (uncovered)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1144

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1146

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1143

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1145

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the table. Tryggvason is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 1998 ASCAN class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. Other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the other international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1149

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1148

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1155

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1150

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1157

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1154

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1147

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the current suits. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1156

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1151

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1152

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1153

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1161

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1158

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1162

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1159

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1172

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1171

Lieutenant Colonel (LCOL) Jan Jach, (left), Poland, discusses a plan to build an Integrated Service Digital Circuit (ISDC) for the network Video Teleconferencing (VTC) system, with Mr. Mike Poindexter, USA Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) section, and Sergeant (SGT) Craig Tolliver, USA, (center), 122nd Signal Brigade, during phase three of COMBINED ENDEAVOR (CE) 2000. CE 2000, currently hosted by Germany, is the largest information and communication systems exercise in the world. This exercise is the sixth in a series of multinational communication interoperability workshops where military personnel from 35 nations get together for 14 days to focus on Command, Control,...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — At Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., astronaut Alan Poindexter explains a science principal to students. Poindexter joined Center Director Jim Kennedy and others on a visit to the school, which has been named one of NASA’s Explorer Schools (NES). Kennedy is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0142

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — Christine Nixon, principal of Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., introduces guests on stage to the audience of students and faculty. The occasion is the kickoff of the NASA Explorer School (NES) program at the school. Seated on stage are (from left) Jim Paul, superintendent of Escambia County Schools; a school official; Denise Jamison, the school’s NASA Team facilitator; Les Gold, NASA aerospace specialist; Gregg Buckingham, NASA official; Jim Kennedy, director of Kennedy Space Center; Charles Baire, District representative, representing Congressman Jeff Miller; Letitia Wheeler, student at Warrington Middle School; Alan Poindexter, NASA astronaut; and Clarence Bostic, NES coordinator. Kennedy is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0134

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — During kickoff of the NASA Explorer School program at Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., NASA aerospace specialist Les Gold involves a student in a demonstration on stage. Gold, Center Director Jim Kennedy, astronaut Alan Poindexter and others are visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0137

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — During kickoff of the NASA Explorer School program at Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., NASA aerospace specialist Les Gold involves a student in a demonstration on stage. Gold, Center Director Jim Kennedy, astronaut Alan Poindexter and others are visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0136

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — During kickoff of the NASA Explorer School program at Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., Center Director Jim Kennedy talks to students and faculty. Seated at left is Christine Nixon, principal of Warrington Middle School. Joining Kennedy for the event was NASA aerospace specialist Les Gold, NASA official Gregg Buckingham, and astronaut Alan Poindexter. Kennedy is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0138

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — Christine Nixon (left), principal of Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., is presented a banner recognizing the school’s new partnership with NASA as a NASA Explorer School. At far right is NASA official Gregg Buckingham, who was joined by Center Director Jim Kennedy and astronaut Alan Poindexter for this kickoff event at the school. Kennedy is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0141

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — At Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., astronaut Alan Poindexter talks to students. Poindexter joined Center Director Jim Kennedy on a visit to the school, which has been named one of NASA’s Explorer Schools (NES). Kennedy is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0144

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — Christine Nixon, principal of Warrington Middle School in Pensacola, Fla., introduces guests on stage to the audience of students and faculty. The occasion is the kickoff of the NASA Explorer School program at the school. Among those seated on stage are Jim Paul, superintendent of Escambia County Schools; Denise Jamison, the school’s NASA Team facilitator; Les Gold, NASA aerospace specialist; Gregg Buckingham, NASA official; Jim Kennedy, director of Kennedy Space Center; Charles Baire, District representative, representing Congressman Jeff Miller; Letitia Wheeler, student at Warrington Middle School; and Alan Poindexter, NASA astronaut. Kennedy is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer School teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-06pd0135

[Hurricane Katrina] New Orleans, St. Bernard, LA, 02-20-06 -- A Community Relations Specialist speaks with Hurricane Katrina victim Sylving Poindexter about her long term recovery housing needs so she may leave the Carnival Cruise ship Sensation that she has been staying on. Sylvia hopes to get into a FEMA travel Trailer and then into an apartment. Community Relations specialists are assisting disaster victims living on the Carnival Cruise Ships Ecstasy and Sensation by finding alternative housing as the ship's housing contract expires March 1st and the ships must set sail. MARVIN NAUMAN/FEMA photo

Official Portrait of Astronaut Alan Poindexter

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston -- JSC2006-E-31443 -- Astronaut Alan G. Poindexter, commander KSC-07pd3281

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members manipulate the cover on the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Seen here are Mission Specialist Rex Walheim (left) and Commander Steve Frick (right). The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0063

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members pause for a photo in front of the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. From left are Pilot Alan Poindexter, Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Stan Love, and Commander Steve Frick. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0060

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. Seen here is Commander Steve Frick. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members manipulate the cover on the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Seen here is (left) Mission Specialist Stan Love.. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. Other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0065

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. In the foreground are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim (left) and Stan Love. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0062

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. Seen here is Commander Steve Frick. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0057

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. Here, Mission Specialist Rex Walheim closely examines a component of the laboratory. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0059

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look at the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Seen here in the foreground are Mission Specialists Stan Love (left) and Rex Walheim. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0064

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Here, Mission Specialist Stan Love (left) and Commander Steve Frick get a close look. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0061

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS122-S-002 -- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-122 crew portrait. From the left (front row) are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, commander; the European Space Agency's, or ESA's, Leopold Eyharts; and Alan G. Poindexter, pilot. From the left (back row) are astronauts Leland D. Melvin, Rex J. Walheim, Stanley G. Love and ESA's Hans Schlegel, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the International Space Station. The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. KSC-07pd3279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Stanley Love looks at the experiment racks inside the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. He and other crew members are at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2604

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin gets a close look at the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2602

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-122 crew look over the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2600

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Rex Walheim points at part of the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. He and other crew members are at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2603

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission. At left is Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel. At right is Pilot Alan Poindexter. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2640

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2660

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members are introduced to part of the LESS. From left are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, Commander Stephen Frick, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin and Pilot Alan Poindexter. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2616

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter checks out the cockpit on space shuttle Atlantis. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2647

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look at some of the equipment for the mission. From left, in the foreground, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Rex Walheim and Pilot Alan Poindexter. In the background at left is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; at right is European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who will be on the mission and joining the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2653

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2658

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew get information about the thermal protection system on space shuttle Atlantis (overhead). From left are Pilot Alan Poindexter, Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Commander Stephen Frick, and Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Leland Melvin and Stanley Love. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2610

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Stanley Love practice working with equipment for the mission. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2650

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From a lower level in the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew check out the landing gear on space shuttle Atlantis, overhead. Dressed in their blue suits are Mission Specialist Leland Melvin, Commander Stephen Frick, European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space Station to join the Expedition 16 crew as a flight engineer. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2611

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission. In the foreground is Mission Specialist Stanley Love. Behind him at left is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; at right is Pilot Alan Poindexter. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2639

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew get a close look at the landing gear on space shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel, Pilot Alan Poindexter, Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin and Commander Stephen Frick. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2608

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2659