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Plumes from Silvered Crown

Plume

Man Wearing a Small Turban Ornamented with Plumes and Ribbon, Facing Right, from Studies of Small Heads in Oriental Headdress

Two mules bearing panniers and outfitted with blinders, plumes, and tassels; one mule in three-quarter view and behind it a mule in frontal view; beyond a man mounted on a horse directs mules with a rod

Drawing of Helmet Hair Plumes

A trip to Zuñi--The Shalaco cross to south side of the river to dance and plant the plumes

Pampas Plumes, California

4:00 P.M. Mrs. Frances Rosep, 309 E. 110th St., New York., ground floor; and three children who work on willow plumes. Tony is 7 years old, Annie, 10. They are learning. Ruby, 12 years old, has worked some months. All make $2.50 a week. Father is a butcher. Location: New York, New York (State)

Making willow plumes under unsanitary conditions. A dirty home, the father and several friends had been rushing the growler and booze was literally flowing around over table and floor. The father is a truck-driver out of work. The mother, Freddie (11yrs. old) and Antoinette (8 yrs. old) all work $1.50 to $2.00 a week now, "but we make $3.00 a week in summer when we can work all day and not go to school." Vincent Tranutolo, 309 E. 110th St., ground floor. Location: New York, New York (State)

3:30 PM Mrs. Rosy Capello, 311 E. 111th St., top floor rear. Makes 50 cents to $1.00 a week on willow plumes. Husband works irregularly as tailor. Location: New York, New York (State)

Mrs. Larocca, 233 E. 107th St., N.Y., making willow plumes in an unlicensed tenement. Photo taken Feb. 29, 1912. License was revoked Dec. 19, 1911.Applied for again Feb 7, 1912, inspected Feb. 13 and refused Feb 14, 1912. Feb. 29, 1912 I found nine families (including the janitress) at work on feathers or with traces of the day's work still on the floor. Still other families were reported to be doing the work also, but were not home. When our investigator made her first calls here, she found the whole tenement in much worse condition (see schedule) Children had bad skin trouble, fever, etc. Grandmother was working the day this photo was taken. New York, New York (State)

Cinon Mataweer in ceremonial plumes

[Israeli luxury liner "Shalom" arriving in New York City escorted by tugboats spraying plumes of water] / World Telegram & Sun photo by Dick DeMarsico.

Space Shuttle Two Percent Plumes Model in the 11ft W.T. (Test-01) ARC-1974-AC74-3944

P-21735 BW This Jupiter image taken by Voyager 2 shows an area from 10° N. Lat. to 34° S. Lat. in a region west of the Great Red Spot. At the top of the picture, equatorial plumes are seen. These features move along the edge of the equatorial zone. The remainder of the equatorial region is characterized by diffuse clouds. The region west of the Great Red Spot is seen as a disturbed wave-like pattern. Similiar flows are seen to the west of the white oval at bottom. ARC-1979-A79-7070

P-21738 BW Raange: 4.76 million kilometers (2.9 million miles) This Voyager 2 picture of Io was taken in ultraviolet light and shows one of the volcanic eruption plumes first photographed by Voyager 1. (the bright spot on the right limb) The plume is more than 200 kilometers (124 miles) high. The volcano apparently has been erupting since it was observed by Voyager 1 in March, 1979. This suggests that the volcanoes on Io probably are in continuous eruption. ARC-1979-A79-7073

Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse photo sequence to monitor the active volcanos on Jupiter's moon Io following the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. This picture is one of about 200 images that will be used to generate a time lapse motion picture to illustrate Io's volcanic activity. On the bright limb, two of the plumes (P-5 & P-6) discovered in March by Voyager 1 are again visible. The plumes are spewing materials to a height of about 100 kilometers. ARC-1979-A79-7094

Range : 1.2 million kilometers (750,000 miles) This picture of Io is one of the last sequence of 'volcano watch' pictures planned as a time lapse study of the nearest of Jupiter's Galilean satellites. The sunlit crescent of Io is seen at the left, and the night side illuminated by light reflected from Jupiter can also be seen. Three volcanic eruption plumes are visible on the limb. All three were previously seen by Voyager 1. On the bright limb Plume 5 (upper) and Plume 6 (lower) are about 100 km high, while Plume 2 on the dark limb is about 185 km high and 325 km wide. The dimensions of Plume 2 are about 1 1/2 times greater than during the Boyager 1 encounter, indicating that the intensity of the eruptions has increased during the four-month time interval between the Boyager encounters. The three volcanic eruptions and at least three others have apparently been active at roughly the same intesity or greater for a period of at least four months. ARC-1979-A79-7099

STS064-09-002 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-33-001 - STS-064 - SPIFEX viewed through a flight deck window

STS064-09-013 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-09-007 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-09-012 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-44-025 - STS-064 - SPIFEX and RMS controls viewed through an aft window

STS064-33-003 - STS-064 - SPIFEX viewed through a flight deck window

STS064-18-012 - STS-064 - MS Helms works on the SPIFEX with a hand-held laser

STS064-18-011 - STS-064 - MS Helms works on the SPIFEX with a hand-held laser

STS064-09-004 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-311-018 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) over the payload bay

STS064-18-010 - STS-064 - MS Helms works on the SPIFEX with a hand-held laser

STS064-05-026 - STS-064 - Astronauts at SPIFEX controls

STS064-57-022 - STS-064 - SPIFEX in stowed position on payload bay

STS064-09-008 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-33-002 - STS-064 - SPIFEX viewed through a flight deck window

STS064-311-016 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) over the payload bay

STS064-310-011 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) on the payload bay

STS064-05-027 - STS-064 - Astronauts at SPIFEX controls

STS064-44-024 - STS-064 - SPIFEX and RMS controls viewed through an aft window

STS064-09-011 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-09-010 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-09-006 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-05-028 - STS-064 - Astronauts at SPIFEX controls

STS064-09-005 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

STS064-57-021 - STS-064 - SPIFEX in stowed position on payload bay

STS064-09-009 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment

S03-09-416 - STS-003 - Rocket Plume from the Forward Reaction Control System

S03-09-418 - STS-003 - Rocket Plume from the Forward Reaction Control System

S03-09-415 - STS-003 - Rocket Plume from the Forward Reaction Control System

S03-09-419 - STS-003 - Rocket Plume from the Forward Reaction Control System

S03-09-417 - STS-003 - Rocket Plume from the Forward Reaction Control System

A C-141B Starlifter aircraft leaves four plumes of exhaust behind it as it prepares for an airdrop during Operation Deep Freeze

National Transonic Facility - Space Shuttle Model

P-34714 This image of the south polar terrain of Triton reveals about 50 dark plumes or 'wind streaks' on the icy surface. The plumes originate at very dark spots generally a few miles in diameter and some are more than 100 miles long. The spots which clearly mark the source of the dark material may be vents where gas has erupted from beneath the surface and carried dark particles into Triton's nitrogen atmosphere. Southwesterly winds then transported the erupted particles, which formed gradually thinning deposits to the northeast of most vents. It is possible that the eruptions have been driven by seasonal heating of very shallow subsurface deposits of volatiles, and the winds transporting particles similiarly may be seasonal winds. The polar terrain, upon which the dark streaks have been deposited, is a region of bright materials mottled with irregular, somewhat dark patches. The pattern of irregular patches suggests that they may correspond to lag deposits of moderately dark material that cap the bright ice over the polar terrain. ARC-1989-A89-7049

Triton Volcanic Plumes

Trailing plumes of smoke, three members of the U.S. Army's Golden Knights parachute demonstration team maneuver around one another during a practice jump into Laurinburg Drop Zone

S44-93-064 - STS-044 - River Plumes in Sunglint, Sarawak, Borneo Earth observation

S44-93-065 - STS-044 - River Plumes in Sunglint, Sarawak, Borneo Earth observation

STS-39 OV-103 reaction control system (RCS) jets fire during onorbit maneuver

STS064-72-070 - STS-064 - Poor view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-72-041 - STS-064 - Dark view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-73-065 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-73-070 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-72-089 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment over the payload bay

STS064-73-062 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-88-009 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment boom deployed from Discovery

STS064-72-092 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment over the payload bay

STS064-72-094 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment over the payload bay

STS064-72-040 - STS-064 - Dark view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-73-060 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-72-068 - STS-064 - Poor view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-73-067 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-73-061 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-73-064 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-72-042 - STS-064 - Dark view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-72-069 - STS-064 - Poor view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-88-011 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment boom deployed from Discovery

STS064-88-010 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment boom deployed from Discovery

STS064-72-093 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment over the payload bay

STS064-72-090 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment over the payload bay

STS064-73-063 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-73-066 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) boom extended

STS064-72-043 - STS-064 - Dark view of the Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX)

STS064-72-091 - STS-064 - Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment equipment over the payload bay

Astronaut Richards initiates thruster firing during SPIFEX operations

SPIFEX at work on end of RMS arm

Astronaut Mark Lee talks to ground controllers about SPIFEX

STS-64 crew share support of the SPIFEX

Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

Triton South Polar Terrain

Io Plume Monitoring (frames 1-36)

Color Mosaic and Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

STS095-S-001 (June 1998) --- The STS-95 patch, designed by the crew, is intended to reflect the scientific, engineering, and historic elements of the mission. The space shuttle Discovery is shown rising over the sunlit Earth limb, representing the global benefits of the mission science and the solar science objectives of the Spartan Satellite. The bold number "7" signifies the seven members of Discovery's crew and also represents a historical link to the original seven Mercury astronauts. The STS-95 crew member John Glenn's first orbital flight is represnted by the Friendship 7 capsule. The rocket plumes symbolize the three major fields of science represented by the mission payloads: microgravity material science, medical research for humans on Earth and in space, and astronomy. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA STS095-s-001

Sequence Showing Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

Migrating Volcanic Plumes on Io

A C-141B Starlifter from McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey, fires off a salvo of flares on its final pass over the "danger zone" during a training exercise. The exercise allowed loadmasters to use a new Plexiglas bubble to look for surface-to-air missle plumes and allowed aircrew members to practice evasive maneuvers

Io - Crescent with Plumes

Sources of Volcanic Plumes Near Prometheus

STS100-704-018 - STS-100 - Earth observation image of dust plumes in Libya taken during STS-100

STS100-704-023 - STS-100 - Earth observation image of dust plumes in Libya taken during STS-100