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Alien reptilian portrait, science technology.

Alien reptilian portrait, science technology.

In Honor of Gustave Adolphe Hirn, Physicist (1815–1890)

In Honor of Gustave Adolphe Hirn, Physicist (1815–1890)

In Honor of Gustave Adolphe Hirn, Physicist (1815–1890)

In Honor of Gustave Adolphe Hirn, Physicist (1815–1890)

[Nils Gustaf Dalén, Swedish physicist and winner of the 1912 Nobel Prize for Physics, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left] / Atelier Jaeger.

[Nils Gustaf Dalén, Swedish physicist and winner of the 1912 Nobel Prize for Physics, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left] / Atelier Jaeger.

Einstein at the Grand Canyon

Einstein at the Grand Canyon

New radio meteorograph developed for the U.S. Navy. Washington, D.C., June 9. The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed for the U.S. Navy Meteorological Service a new radio meteorograph. The new instrument (shown in the picture) is sent up on a 5-Foot balloon and is expected to replace the use of airplanes in upper-air meteorological surroundings. E.G. Lapham, Associate Physicist of the bureau, is shown assembling the new meteorograph in preperation for an ascent. The device transmits audio notes which are a function of temperature and humidity. These notes are interrupted at approximately each 10-millibar increment in pressure, thus identifying each temperature and humidity indication with its respective increment of altitude, 6/9/37

New radio meteorograph developed for the U.S. Navy. Washington, D.C., June 9. The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed for the U.S. Navy Meteorological Service a new radio meteorograph. The new instrument (shown in the picture) is sent up on a 5-Foot balloon and is expected to replace the use of airplanes in upper-air meteorological surroundings. E.G. Lapham, Associate Physicist of the bureau, is shown assembling the new meteorograph in preperation for an ascent. The device transmits audio notes which are a function of temperature and humidity. These notes are interrupted at approximately each 10-millibar increment in pressure, thus identifying each temperature and humidity indication with its respective increment of altitude, 6/9/37

Paul Aebersold and Gladys Anslow at the 60-inch cyclotron, August 26, 1939. Dr. Anslow, a physicist was the first woman to work on the 8MeV cyclotron at Berkeley and was one of the few women involved with the Manhatten Project. Cooksey 48 [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Paul Aebersold and Gladys Anslow at the 60-inch cyclotron, August 26, 1939. Dr. Anslow, a physicist was the first woman to work on the 8MeV cyclotron at Berkeley and was one of the few women involved with the Manhatten Project. Cooksey 48 [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Ernest Orlando Lawrence (right); Alfred Lee Loomis, philanthropist, attorney, banker, physicist (center); and Warren Weaver, mathematician (left) participating in preliminary meetings of the Manhattan Project in a room at the Wardman Park, Washington, D.C. Photo taken April 22, 1940. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Ernest Orlando Lawrence (right); Alfred Lee Loomis, philanthropist, attorney, banker, physicist (center); and Warren Weaver, mathematician (left) participating in preliminary meetings of the Manhattan Project in a room at the Wardman Park, Washington, D.C. Photo taken April 22, 1940. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Isidor Isaac Rabi, physicist and Nobel Laureate, taken April 11, 1941. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Isidor Isaac Rabi, physicist and Nobel Laureate, taken April 11, 1941. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Charles Galton Darwin, physicist (grandson of Charles Darwin), taken October 1, 1941. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Charles Galton Darwin, physicist (grandson of Charles Darwin), taken October 1, 1941. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Charles Galton Darwin, physicist (grandson of Charles Darwin), taken October 1, 1941. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Charles Galton Darwin, physicist (grandson of Charles Darwin), taken October 1, 1941. Principal Investigator/Project: Analog Conversion Project [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

YUKAWA STORY

YUKAWA STORY

72-inch hydrogen bubble chamber (biggest in the world) was christened at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on June 22, 1959. Left to right on the top-platform control panel of the chamber: Ken Langley (operating crew chief), Bob Watt (physicist), and Dick Blumberg (mechanical engineer). Magnet 1959-46 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

72-inch hydrogen bubble chamber (biggest in the world) was christened at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on June 22, 1959. Left to right on the top-platform control panel of the chamber: Ken Langley (operating crew chief), Bob Watt (physicist), and Dick Blumberg (mechanical engineer). Magnet 1959-46 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

The experimenters of the coulomb-excitation studies gather in front of an oscilloscope. Left to right: Jerry Igo (physicist), Bent Elbek (physicist), Dick Brower (graduate student, chemistry), and Dick Diamond (chemist), taken October 1959. Morgue 1959-59 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

The experimenters of the coulomb-excitation studies gather in front of an oscilloscope. Left to right: Jerry Igo (physicist), Bent Elbek (physicist), Dick Brower (graduate student, chemistry), and Dick Diamond (chemist), taken October 1959. Morgue 1959-59 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Working rapidly, physicist Vern Ehlers adjusts the atomic-beam machine, which will give him data on nuclear and atomic spin of gallium-70. (Helicopter aids Berkeley physicists working with fast-decaying elements). Taken, January 1960. Morgue 1960-36 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Working rapidly, physicist Vern Ehlers adjusts the atomic-beam machine, which will give him data on nuclear and atomic spin of gallium-70. (Helicopter aids Berkeley physicists working with fast-decaying elements). Taken, January 1960. Morgue 1960-36 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Synchrotron operation ends with lead physicist, Bob Kenney (right) and engineer, Rudy Johnson in the synchrotron control room. Morgue 1960-40 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Synchrotron operation ends with lead physicist, Bob Kenney (right) and engineer, Rudy Johnson in the synchrotron control room. Morgue 1960-40 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Discussing the cyclotron magnet (seen in the background) are Dr. Elmer Kelly, physicist in charge of the 88-inch cyclotron and Warren Dexter, who is electrical coordinator for the cyclotron project. Morgue 1960-102 (P-4) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Discussing the cyclotron magnet (seen in the background) are Dr. Elmer Kelly, physicist in charge of the 88-inch cyclotron and Warren Dexter, who is electrical coordinator for the cyclotron project. Morgue 1960-102 (P-4) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of Dr. David Judd, theoretical physicist. Photo taken November 14, 1961. Morgue 1961-24 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of Dr. David Judd, theoretical physicist. Photo taken November 14, 1961. Morgue 1961-24 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

On the beach in Kauai, Hawaii Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) scientists prepare a rocket nose cone for its long ride into space. Physicist Dick Albers (right) checks the position of a standard Pu-Be neutron source as George Costello, of Health Physics, monitors neutron scattering at nose cone. Photo taken in the Fall of 1962. Morgue 1963-81 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

On the beach in Kauai, Hawaii Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) scientists prepare a rocket nose cone for its long ride into space. Physicist Dick Albers (right) checks the position of a standard Pu-Be neutron source as George Costello, of Health Physics, monitors neutron scattering at nose cone. Photo taken in the Fall of 1962. Morgue 1963-81 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

From right to left, front: Edward Lofgren, Vladimir Veksler, Russian experimantal physicist, and Edwin McMillan in the Bevatron control room, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-8) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

From right to left, front: Edward Lofgren, Vladimir Veksler, Russian experimantal physicist, and Edwin McMillan in the Bevatron control room, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-8) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Ed Lofgren (left), Edwin McMillan (right), and Vladimir Veksler, Russian experimantal physicist (center) with the Bevatron model, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Ed Lofgren (left), Edwin McMillan (right), and Vladimir Veksler, Russian experimantal physicist (center) with the Bevatron model, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Edwin McMillan (right) and Vladimir Veksler, Russian experimantal physicist (left) in the Bevatron control room, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Edwin McMillan (right) and Vladimir Veksler, Russian experimantal physicist (left) in the Bevatron control room, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Edwin McMillan (left) and Vladimir Veksler (right), Russian experimantal physicist in the Bevatron control room, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-4) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Edwin McMillan (left) and Vladimir Veksler (right), Russian experimantal physicist in the Bevatron control room, taken October 28, 1963. Morgue 1963-35 (P-4) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Physicist Angelina Galtieri, right consults log with operator in control room of the Bevatron. Photo taken November 13, 1963. Morgue 1963-39 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Physicist Angelina Galtieri, right consults log with operator in control room of the Bevatron. Photo taken November 13, 1963. Morgue 1963-39 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Ernest Walton, Irish physicist and Nobel Laureate with Edwin McMillan, right. Photo taken April 15,1965. Morgue 1965-5 (P-6) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Ernest Walton, Irish physicist and Nobel Laureate with Edwin McMillan, right. Photo taken April 15,1965. Morgue 1965-5 (P-6) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Ernest Walton, Irish physicist and Nobel Laureate with Edwin McMillan, right. Photo taken April 15,1965. Morgue 1965-5 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Ernest Walton, Irish physicist and Nobel Laureate with Edwin McMillan, right. Photo taken April 15,1965. Morgue 1965-5 (P-2) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Ernest Walton, Irish physicist and Nobel Laureate with Edwin McMillan, right. Photo taken April 15,1965. Morgue 1965-5 (P-5) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr. Ernest Walton, Irish physicist and Nobel Laureate with Edwin McMillan, right. Photo taken April 15,1965. Morgue 1965-5 (P-5) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of physicist Bruce Cork taken in June, 1966. Morgue 1966-84 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of physicist Bruce Cork taken in June, 1966. Morgue 1966-84 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of physicist Harold P. Furth, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory's Sherwood Program, taken June 17, 1966. Morgue 1966-78 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of physicist Harold P. Furth, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory's Sherwood Program, taken June 17, 1966. Morgue 1966-78 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Leon Van Hove (Belgian physicist, head of Theory Division at CERN), Willibald Jentsche (CERN Director General), Bernard Gregory (CERN), Victor Weisskopf (Manhatten Project), and T.G. Pickavance (CERN/ECFA) at High Energy Physics Conference taken September 1966. Morgue 1966-160 [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Leon Van Hove (Belgian physicist, head of Theory Division at CERN), Willibald Jentsche (CERN Director General), Bernard Gregory (CERN), Victor Weisskopf (Manhatten Project), and T.G. Pickavance (CERN/ECFA) at High Energy Physics Conference taken September 1966. Morgue 1966-160 [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Physicist William Lackey cools liquid nitrogen to trap a sorbent tube sample in the Data Collections School of Aeromedical Medicine

Physicist William Lackey cools liquid nitrogen to trap a sorbent tube sample in the Data Collections School of Aeromedical Medicine

Dr. James A. Whalen, physicist, seated, and Dr. Jurgen Buchau discuss the operation of the SWEPT frequency sounder receiving system in the Auroral Ionospheric Research Room of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL)

Dr. James A. Whalen, physicist, seated, and Dr. Jurgen Buchau discuss the operation of the SWEPT frequency sounder receiving system in the Auroral Ionospheric Research Room of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL)

Dr. James A. Whalen, physicist, and Dr. Jurgen Buchau, left to right, discuss the operation of the SWEPT frequency sounder receiving system in the Auroral Ionospheric Research Room of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL)

Dr. James A. Whalen, physicist, and Dr. Jurgen Buchau, left to right, discuss the operation of the SWEPT frequency sounder receiving system in the Auroral Ionospheric Research Room of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL)

Dr. James A. Whalen, physicist, collects high altitude ionosphere behavior data fro the SWEPT frequency sounder receiving system in the Auroral Ionoshperic Research room of the Air Force Geophysics laboratory

Dr. James A. Whalen, physicist, collects high altitude ionosphere behavior data fro the SWEPT frequency sounder receiving system in the Auroral Ionoshperic Research room of the Air Force Geophysics laboratory

Portrait of physicist Dr. Marian Whitehead sitting at her desk. Her research is in strange-particle physics, using emulsion, counter and bubble chamber techniques. Morgue 1959-36 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Portrait of physicist Dr. Marian Whitehead sitting at her desk. Her research is in strange-particle physics, using emulsion, counter and bubble chamber techniques. Morgue 1959-36 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Feynman diagram from 10-inch bubble chamber run at Bevatron. Richard Phillips Feynman, American theoretical physicist. Photograph taken March 26, 1956. Bubble Chamber-78

Feynman diagram from 10-inch bubble chamber run at Bevatron. Richard Phillips Feynman, American theoretical physicist. Photograph taken March 26, 1956. Bubble Chamber-78

Carrying a neutron radiation detector, Fred Sanders (at center), a health physicist with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and other health physics personnel monitor radiation in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility after three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) were installed on the Cassini spacecraft for mechanical and electrical verification tests. The RTGs will provide electrical power to Cassini on its 6.7-year trip to the Saturnian system and during its four-year mission at Saturn. RTGs use heat from the natural decay of plutonium to generate electric power. The generators enable spacecraft to operate at great distances from the Sun where solar power systems are not feasible. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch aboard a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle. Cassini is built and managed by JPL KSC-97PC1087

Carrying a neutron radiation detector, Fred Sanders  (at center), a health physicist with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and other health  physics personnel monitor radiation in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility after  three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) were installed on the Cassini  spacecraft for mechanical and electrical verification tests. The RTGs will provide  electrical power to Cassini on its 6.7-year trip to the Saturnian system and during its  four-year mission at Saturn. RTGs use heat from the natural decay of plutonium to  generate electric power. The generators enable spacecraft to operate at great distances  from the Sun where solar power systems are not feasible. The Cassini mission is  targeted for an Oct. 6 launch aboard a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle.  Cassini is built and managed by JPL KSC-97PC1087

US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Trina Powell (foreground), a Health Physicist with the Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (CHPM) in Europe, uses a Radiation Monitor to obtain gamma radiation reading at a storage facility near Viasani, Georgia. CHPM is performing an environmental health assessment on various sites around Tbilisi, Georgia that will be utilized by members of the US Army (USA) 10th Special Forces Group (SFG) under the Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). GTEP conducted by US Special Operations Command (SOC) Europe is designed to enhance the capability of selected Georgian military units to provide security and stability to the citizens of Georgia and the...

US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Trina Powell (foreground), a Health Physicist with the Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (CHPM) in Europe, uses a Radiation Monitor to obtain gamma radiation reading at a storage facility near Viasani, Georgia. CHPM is performing an environmental health assessment on various sites around Tbilisi, Georgia that will be utilized by members of the US Army (USA) 10th Special Forces Group (SFG) under the Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). GTEP conducted by US Special Operations Command (SOC) Europe is designed to enhance the capability of selected Georgian military units to provide security and stability to the citizens of Georgia and the...

US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Trina Powell, a Health Physicist with the Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (CHPM) in Europe, uses a Radiation Monitor to obtain gamma radiation reading at a storage facility near Viasani, Georgia. CHPM is performing an environmental health assessment on various sites around Tbilisi, Georgia that will be utilized by members of the US Army (USA) 10th Special Forces Group (SFG) under the Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). GTEP conducted by US Special Operations Command (SOC) Europe is designed to enhance the capability of selected Georgian military units to provide security and stability to the citizens of Georgia and the region

US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Trina Powell, a Health Physicist with the Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (CHPM) in Europe, uses a Radiation Monitor to obtain gamma radiation reading at a storage facility near Viasani, Georgia. CHPM is performing an environmental health assessment on various sites around Tbilisi, Georgia that will be utilized by members of the US Army (USA) 10th Special Forces Group (SFG) under the Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). GTEP conducted by US Special Operations Command (SOC) Europe is designed to enhance the capability of selected Georgian military units to provide security and stability to the citizens of Georgia and the region

US Air Force (USAF) MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Brian Brownsberger, Videographer, 786th Communications Squadron (CS) used a video camera to document US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Trina Powell, a Health Physicist with the Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (CHPM) in Europe, as she uses a Radiation Monitor to obtain gamma radiation reading from a trench complex near Viasani, Georgia. CHPM is performing an environmental health assessment on various sites around Tbilisi, Georgia that will be utilized by members of the US Army (USA) 10th Special Forces Group (SFG) under the Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). GTEP conducted by US Special Operations Command (SOC) Europe is...

US Air Force (USAF) MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Brian Brownsberger, Videographer, 786th Communications Squadron (CS) used a video camera to document US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Trina Powell, a Health Physicist with the Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (CHPM) in Europe, as she uses a Radiation Monitor to obtain gamma radiation reading from a trench complex near Viasani, Georgia. CHPM is performing an environmental health assessment on various sites around Tbilisi, Georgia that will be utilized by members of the US Army (USA) 10th Special Forces Group (SFG) under the Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). GTEP conducted by US Special Operations Command (SOC) Europe is...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Former astronaut Owen Garriott acknowledges the applause as he is introduced as a previous inductee into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. He and other Hall of Fame members were present for the induction of five new space program heroes into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame: Richard O. Covey, commander of the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission; Norman E. Thagard, the first American to occupy Russia’s Mir space station; the late Francis R. "Dick" Scobee, commander of the ill-fated 1986 Challenger mission; Kathryn D. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space; and Frederick D. Gregory, the first African-American to command a space mission and the current NASA deputy administrator. Garriott exercised his expertise as a solar physicist on two space missions, the 59-day Skylab 3 flight in 1973, and an 11-day trip aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia a decade later. The induction ceremony was held at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The five inductees join 52 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs. KSC-04pd1012

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Former astronaut Owen Garriott acknowledges the applause as he is introduced as a previous inductee into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame.  He and other  Hall of Fame members were present for the induction of five new space program heroes into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame: Richard O. Covey, commander of the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission; Norman E. Thagard, the first American to occupy Russia’s Mir space station; the late Francis R. "Dick" Scobee, commander of the ill-fated 1986 Challenger mission; Kathryn D. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space; and Frederick D. Gregory, the first African-American to command a space mission and the current NASA deputy administrator. Garriott exercised his expertise as a solar physicist on two space missions, the 59-day Skylab 3 flight in 1973, and an 11-day trip aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia a decade later. The induction ceremony was held at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC.  The U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The five inductees join 52 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs. KSC-04pd1012

Stardust sample analysis @ UC Berkeley clean room with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist - mission samples provided to UC Berkeley for analysis by NASA: Dr Andrew Westphal, Berkeley Physicist with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist oversee sample analysis ARC-2006-ACD06-0216-026

Stardust sample analysis @ UC Berkeley clean room  with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist - mission samples provided to UC Berkeley for analysis by NASA: Dr Andrew Westphal, Berkeley Physicist with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist oversee sample analysis ARC-2006-ACD06-0216-026

Stardust sample analysis @ UC Berkeley clean room - mission samples provided to UC Berkeley for analysis by NASA: (r) Dr Andrew Westphal, Berkeley Physicist with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist (l) oversee sample analysis - Jess Carpenter NASA/Ames videographer documents the event ARC-2006-ACD06-0216-027

Stardust sample analysis @ UC Berkeley clean room  - mission samples provided to UC Berkeley for analysis by NASA:  (r)  Dr Andrew Westphal, Berkeley Physicist with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist (l)  oversee sample analysis - Jess Carpenter NASA/Ames videographer documents the event ARC-2006-ACD06-0216-027

Stardust sample analysis @ UC Berkeley clean room - mission samples provided to UC Berkeley for analysis by NASA: Dr Andrew Westphal, Berkeley Physicist with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist holding a (aerogel) sample (Dr Sandford reports that 'My Colleagues Andrew Westphal, Christopher Snead and Zack Gainsforth have produced over 100 keystones from the Stardust comet aerogel ARC-2006-ACD06-0216-035

Stardust sample analysis @ UC Berkeley clean room  - mission samples provided to UC Berkeley for analysis by NASA: Dr Andrew Westphal, Berkeley Physicist with Dr Scott Sandford, NASA Ames Astrophysicist holding a (aerogel) sample (Dr Sandford  reports that 'My Colleagues Andrew Westphal, Christopher Snead and Zack Gainsforth have produced over 100 keystones from the Stardust comet aerogel ARC-2006-ACD06-0216-035

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, arrives at the runway for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. At left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. At center is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0954

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, arrives at the runway for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  At left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. At center is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0954

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, is ready to get onboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. for his first zero-gravity flight. Zero Gravity Corp. is a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. At right is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. Behind Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0955

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, is ready to get onboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. for his first zero-gravity flight.  Zero Gravity Corp. is a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  At right is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp.  Behind Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0955

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The media surround noted wheelchair-bound physicist Stephen Hawking after his arrival at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight. Behind Hawking, at left, are Zero Gravity Corporation founder Peter Diamandis and Space Florida president Steve Kohler. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero G, a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0949

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The media surround noted wheelchair-bound physicist Stephen Hawking after his arrival at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight.  Behind Hawking, at left, are Zero Gravity Corporation founder Peter Diamandis and Space Florida president Steve Kohler. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero G, a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0949

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: Jim Campbell, Aero-News Network KSC-07pd0958

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard  a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G).  Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G.  Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide.  At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: Jim Campbell, Aero-News Network KSC-07pd0958

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Well-wishers greet noted physicist Stephen Hawking (in the wheelchair) at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight. Next to him at left are Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727, and Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0962

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Well-wishers greet noted physicist Stephen Hawking (in the wheelchair) at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight.  Next to him at left are Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727, and Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0962

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp., talks to the media about physicist Stephen Hawking's (in the wheelchair) first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0951

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp., talks to the media about physicist Stephen Hawking's (in the wheelchair) first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0951

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, Space Florida president Steve Kohler (left) talks to the media about physicist Stephen Hawking's (in the wheelchair) first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. At right is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0950

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, Space Florida president Steve Kohler (left) talks to the media about physicist Stephen Hawking's (in the wheelchair) first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  At right is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0950

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Peter Diamandis (left), founder of the Zero Gravity Corp., and noted physicist Stephen Hawking move away from Zero G's modified Boeing 727 on the runway at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. Hawking enjoyed his first zero gravity flight provided by Zero G. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0964

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Peter Diamandis (left), founder of the Zero Gravity Corp., and noted physicist Stephen Hawking move away from Zero G's modified Boeing 727 on the runway at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.  Hawking enjoyed his first zero gravity flight provided by Zero G.  At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0964

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Well-wishers greet noted physicist Stephen Hawking (in the wheelchair) at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight. Next to him at left are Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727, and Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0963

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Well-wishers greet noted physicist Stephen Hawking (in the wheelchair) at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight.  Next to him at left are Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727, and Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease).  At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0963

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, arrives at the runway for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. At left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. Behind Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0952

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, arrives at the runway for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  At left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. Behind Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide.   Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0952

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, arrives at the runway for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. At left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. At center is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0953

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, noted physicist Stephen Hawking, in the wheelchair, arrives at the runway for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  At left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. At center is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0953

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) returns to the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight. At far left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0961

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) returns to the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight. At far left is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727.  Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease).  At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0961

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) returns to the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight. At his side is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At far left on the truck's tail gate is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0960

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) returns to the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility after a zero gravity flight.  At his side is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide.  At far left on the truck's tail gate is Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero Gravity Corp. that provided the flight aboard its modified Boeing 727.  Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease).  At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0960

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. is ready to take off with its well-known passenger, physicist Stephen Hawking. Zero Gravity Corp. is a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking will be making his first zero-gravity flight. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0956

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. is ready to take off with its well-known passenger, physicist Stephen Hawking.  Zero Gravity Corp. is a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  Hawking will be making his first zero-gravity flight.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0956

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. — Noted physicist Stephen Hawking greets the media after his arrival at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0948

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. —  Noted physicist Stephen Hawking greets the media after his arrival at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0948

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. takes off with its well-known passenger, physicist Stephen Hawking. Zero Gravity Corp. is a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking will be making his first zero-gravity flight. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-07pd0957

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility, a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. takes off with its well-known passenger, physicist Stephen Hawking. Zero Gravity Corp. is a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  Hawking will be making his first zero-gravity flight.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-07pd0957

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking arrives at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0946

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --   Noted physicist Stephen Hawking arrives at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight.  The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp., a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences.  Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0946

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The media surround noted wheelchair-bound physicist Stephen Hawking after his arrival at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight. Behind Hawking, at left, is Space Florida president Steve Kohler. In the center, striding toward Hawking, is Zero Gravity Corp. founder Peter Diamandis. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity, a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0947

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --   The media surround noted wheelchair-bound physicist Stephen Hawking after his arrival at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility for his first zero-gravity flight.  Behind Hawking, at left, is Space Florida president Steve Kohler.  In the center, striding toward Hawking, is Zero Gravity Corp. founder Peter Diamandis. The flight will be aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity, a commercial company licensed to provide the public with weightless flight experiences. Hawking developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease in the 1960s, a type of motor neuron disease which would cost him the loss of almost all neuromuscular control. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0947

Robert Oppenheimer's "pork-pie" hat. Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist known as the father of the atomic bomb frequently wore a pork pie hat (Wikipedia entry, 2009). Morgue 1944-101 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Robert Oppenheimer's "pork-pie" hat. Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist known as the father of the atomic bomb frequently wore a pork pie hat (Wikipedia entry, 2009). Morgue 1944-101 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

TITUSVILLE, Fla. - Former astronauts Jon McBride, left, and Bob Crippen, center, along with Kennedy Space Center director Bob Cabana, also a former astronaut, laid a wreath at the U. S. Astronaut Hall of Fame honoring Sally K. Ride, who became America's first woman in space in 1983. Following her death on July 23, 2012, Ride is being remembered for her service to NASA and for her efforts to encourage children to study math, science and technology. Crippen was commander on both of Ride's space shuttle missions. McBride was pilot on her second flight. Ride was inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2003. A California-born physicist, she broke the gender barrier 29 years ago when she rode to orbit aboard space shuttle Challenger on STS-7. Ride subsequently served, again as a mission specialist, on STS-41G in 1984. Following her career with NASA, in 2001 Ride founded her own company, Sally Ride Science, to pursue her long-time passion of motivating youth -- especially girls and young women -- to pursue careers in technical fields. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2012-3957

TITUSVILLE, Fla. - Former astronauts Jon McBride, left, and Bob Crippen, center, along with Kennedy Space Center director Bob Cabana, also a former astronaut, laid a wreath at the U. S. Astronaut Hall of Fame honoring Sally K. Ride, who became America's first woman in space in 1983. Following her death on July 23, 2012, Ride is being remembered for her service to NASA and for her efforts to encourage children to study math, science and technology. Crippen was commander on both of Ride's space shuttle missions. McBride was pilot on her second flight. Ride was inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2003.      A California-born physicist, she broke the gender barrier 29 years ago when she rode to orbit aboard space shuttle Challenger on STS-7. Ride subsequently served, again as a mission specialist, on STS-41G in 1984. Following her career with NASA, in 2001 Ride founded her own company, Sally Ride Science, to pursue her long-time passion of motivating youth -- especially girls and young women -- to pursue careers in technical fields.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2012-3957

TITUSVILLE, Fla. - A wreath was laid at the U. S. Astronaut Hall of Fame honoring Sally K. Ride, who became America's first woman in space in 1983. Following her death on July 23, 2012, Ride is being remembered for her service to NASA and for her efforts to encourage children to study math, science and technology. A California-born physicist, she broke the gender barrier 29 years ago when she rode to orbit aboard space shuttle Challenger on STS-7. Ride subsequently served, again as a mission specialist, on STS-41G in 1984. Following her career with NASA, in 2001 Ride founded her own company, Sally Ride Science, to pursue her long-time passion of motivating youth -- especially girls and young women -- to pursue careers in technical fields. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2012-3958

TITUSVILLE, Fla. - A wreath was laid at the U. S. Astronaut Hall of Fame honoring Sally K. Ride, who became America's first woman in space in 1983. Following her death on July 23, 2012, Ride is being remembered for her service to NASA and for her efforts to encourage children to study math, science and technology.      A California-born physicist, she broke the gender barrier 29 years ago when she rode to orbit aboard space shuttle Challenger on STS-7. Ride subsequently served, again as a mission specialist, on STS-41G in 1984. Following her career with NASA, in 2001 Ride founded her own company, Sally Ride Science, to pursue her long-time passion of motivating youth -- especially girls and young women -- to pursue careers in technical fields.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2012-3958

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside a laboratory in the Engineering Development Laboratory, or EDL, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, research physicist Phil Metzger describes lunar excavators and soil processing technologies to a group of Society of Physics students. About 800 graduate and undergraduate physics students toured Kennedy facilities. A group of about 40 students toured laboratories in the Operations and Checkout Building and the EDL during their visit. The physics students were in Orlando for the 2012 Quadrennial Physics Congress. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2012-6216

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside a laboratory in the Engineering Development Laboratory, or EDL, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, research physicist Phil Metzger describes lunar excavators and soil processing technologies to a group of Society of Physics students.    About 800 graduate and undergraduate physics students toured Kennedy facilities. A group of about 40 students toured laboratories in the Operations and Checkout Building and the EDL during their visit. The physics students were in Orlando for the 2012 Quadrennial Physics Congress. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2012-6216

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside a laboratory in the Engineering Development Laboratory, or EDL, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, research physicist Phil Metzger describes lunar excavators and soil processing technologies to a group of Society of Physics students. About 800 graduate and undergraduate physics students toured Kennedy facilities. A group of about 40 students toured laboratories in the Operations and Checkout Building and the EDL during their visit. The physics students were in Orlando for the 2012 Quadrennial Physics Congress. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2012-6215

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside a laboratory in the Engineering Development Laboratory, or EDL, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, research physicist Phil Metzger describes lunar excavators and soil processing technologies to a group of Society of Physics students.    About 800 graduate and undergraduate physics students toured Kennedy facilities. A group of about 40 students toured laboratories in the Operations and Checkout Building and the EDL during their visit. The physics students were in Orlando for the 2012 Quadrennial Physics Congress. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2012-6215

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