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Pelicans from BL Harley 4751, f. 46

Pelicans from BL Harley 4751, f. 46

[The Buffalo]

Christ Child with Pelicans

American white pelican (pelicanu americanus), and male adult / drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, F.R.S. F.L.S. ; engraved, printed, & coloured by R. Havell, 1836.

[The Pelicans and Greenhouses, Zoological Gardens, Brussels]

Pelicans in zoological gardens, Cincinnati, O.

Pelicans in zoological gardens, Cincinnati, O.

pelicans from "Stories of the Gorilla Country, etc"

Pelican Island, Indian River

Pelican Island, Indian River

Pelican Island, Indian River

Pelican Island, Indian River

[Five flying pelicans]

[Pelican eating baby turtles]

Then the bird laughed

[Group of public school children looking at pelicans and swan in the National Zoo(?), Washington, D.C.]

Pelican

Pelican Islands, Florida--"City of refuge" for pelicans--protected by Uncle Sam from extinction

ZOO. PELICANS

Birds. Pelican (head looking to right)

Birds. Pelican (head looking to right)

Birds. Pelican (head looking to right)

Tel Aviv Zoo. [Birds in cage including pelicans and black backed gulls]

Cairo Zoo. Pellicans [i.e., pelicans] & giraffes

Cairo Zoo. Pellicans [i.e., pelicans] & giraffes

Cairo Zoo. Pellicans [i.e., pelicans] & giraffes

Tel Aviv Zoo. The bird cage, pelicans & blackbacked gulls, winter visitors of Palestine

Birds of the world An illustrated natural history in popular style with 100 candid photos : A New York City, W.P.A. Federal Writers' Project book : American guide series.

Santa Claus fishing: Sarasota, Florida

Pelican at the Garrison Bight docks: Key West, Florida

Pelicans awaiting a snack: Garrison Bight Docks, Key West, Florida

Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway - Pelicans at Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Creole Nature Trail - Pelicans and Seagulls on Dock Posts

A1A Scenic and Historic Coastal Byway - Pelicans in Flight

Indian River Lagoon National Scenic Byway - Pelicans at Pelican Island

Official painting of a P-3C Orion anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft of Patrol Squadron Forty-four (VP-44), the Golden Pelicans, in flight over the Atlantic Ocean

Aerial right side view of a P-3C Orion (ASW) anti-submarine aircraft of Patrol Squadron Forty-Four (VP-44), the Golden Pelicans. The squadron home based at Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine is presently forward deployed to NAS Signonella

Aerial right rear view of a P-3C Orion anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft of Patrol Squadron Forty-Four (VP-44) the Golden Pelicans, flying over the coast of Iceland during deployment to Naval Air Station Keflavik from the squadrons home base at NAS Brunswick, Maine. The squadron was formally disestablished 31 May 1991

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Ducks take flight across the marshes of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The duck at top-center is a pintail, which can be found in marshes, prairie ponds and tundra, and salt marshes in winter. They range from Alaska and Greenland south to Central America and the West Indies. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods KSC-99wl10

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An alligator lurks in the murky, mossy waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Its tail surfaces behind him, looking like a log in the water. The wildlife refuge harbors nearly 5,000 American alligators, some of which can be seen in the canals and ponds around KSC. The refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The open water provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl and a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99wl09

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pintail duck swims calmly in the waters of the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a>Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. The pintail can be found in marshes, prairie ponds and tundra, and salt marshes in winter. They range from Alaska and Greenland south to Central America and the West Indies. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc65

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A sandpiper wades the water in the Merritt Island National <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/wildlife.htm">Wildlife </a> Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. Sandpipers are usually seen foraging on the beach or margins of lakes, ponds, marshes or streams. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators KSC-99pc64

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A flock of ducks launch into the morning sky in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0106

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A male pintail duck (left) and female pintail (right) look like bookends on a glass-topped table in the winter waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0104

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A male pintail duck (foreground) paddles in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center while a female behind him bobs for food. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0103

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A mockingbird perches on a limb in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The birds range from southern Canada south to the Caribbean and winter in the southern part of the range. Mockingbirds are very vocal, often imitating the sounds of other birds. Besides providing a winter home for the mockingbird, the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Male (foreground) and female pintail ducks climb onto a grassy spot in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0107

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two female pintail ducks search for food in the winter waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0105

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The broad, distinctive bill is a primary feature of this northern shoveler, paddling in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Typically found in western Canada, Alaska, Colorado and Southern California, it can also be found farther east and south, wintering in the United States along the southeast coast. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0109

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- These wood storks stand in grassy patches near the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Known as "flint heads" and "gourd heads" because of their naked crowns, the wood stork is found throughout Florida and occasionally South Carolina and Texas, breeding in cypress and mangrove swamps. The refuge is a year-round home for wood storks, plus great blue herons, great egrets, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a wintering area for 23 species of migratory waterfowl. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0114

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This male blue-winged teal is one of 23 species of migratory waterfowl that winter in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male is usually identified with pale blue shoulder patches and a white crescent in front of its eye. The blue-winged teal's normal range is from Canada to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, preferring marshes, shallow ponds and lakes. It winters as far as northern South America. The refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0112

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A male and two female hooded mergansers swim in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male displays its distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0110

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Balancing on one leg, a roseate spoonbill is reflected in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0113

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast identify this hooded merganser, swimming in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0111

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female hooded merganser swims solo in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male is distinguished by a fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0115

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A belted kingfisher soars over the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The pigeon-sized, blue-gray male is identified by the blue-gray breast band; females show a chestnut belly band. The belted kingfisher ranges throughout the United States and Canada, wintering south to Panama and the West Indies. They dive into the water for fish and may also take crabs, crayfish, salamanders, lizards, mice and insects. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pc0132

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female red-breasted merganser swims low in the water at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0139

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A young female red-breasted merganser swims in the quicksilver water of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles KSC-99pc0140

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- White pelicans search for a meal in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0249

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female red-breasted merganser paddles in the rippled water of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center. Male mergansers have a green head, gray sides, white neck ring and rusty breast. One of three mergansers commonly found on salt water, it ranges from northern lakes and tundra ponds, wintering principally on the ocean and in salt bays. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0247

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A belted kingfisher perches on a twig in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center. The pigeon-sized, blue-gray male is identified by the blue-gray breast band; females show a chestnut belly band. The belted kingfisher ranges throughout the United States and Canada, wintering south to Panama and the West Indies. They dive into the water for fish and may also take crabs, crayfish, salamanders, lizards, mice and insects. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0246

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- White pelicans are joined by a few egrets at a feeding frenzy in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Pelicans in flight display their black wing tips, which are hidden when folded. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0248

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- White pelicans soaring over the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge reveal the black wing feathers that are hidden when folded. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0250

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of blue-winged teals glide through the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Inhabiting marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, the teal winters as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0252

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A flock of short-billed dowitchers crowd onto a grassy mound in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The dowitchers range from southern Alaska to eastern Canada, and they winter from the southern United States to central South America. They often frequent coastal flats during migrations. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0254

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A snowy egret wades the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Ranging from northern California, Oklahoma and Maine to southern South America, the snowy egret winters north to California and South Carolina. In the East, they are best known as salt marsh birds. Once an endangered species, their numbers have increased again. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0256

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The furious beating wings of a blue-winged teal launch it from the water as another swims calmly beneath it in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Inhabiting marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, the teal winters as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0255

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A glossy ibis searches for food in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Identified by its chestnut plumage and green wings, the glossy ibis ranges on or near the coast from Maine to Florida and Texas. It inhabits marshes, swamps, flooded fields, coastal bays, and estuaries. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0257

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of willets soars to a landing among a flock of short-billed dowitchers on a grassy mound in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The dowitchers' range is southern Alaska to eastern Canada, and they also winter from the southern United States to central South America. They often frequent coastal flats during migrations. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0258

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The stilt is identified by its distinct head pattern of black and white, its very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. The stilt's habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A sandpiper-like Lesser Yellowlegs eyes the water for food in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The gray-streaked wader is found in marshy ponds, lake and river shores, and mud flats in Alaska and Canada; it winters in the southern United States to southern South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0304

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Roseate Spoonbill sweeps the water for food in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The brilliant pink bird is named for its straight bill with the broad spatulate tip. Preferring a habitat of mangroves, it is usually found on the coasts of southern Florida and Texas, occasionally in Louisiana., in the West Indies, Mexico and Central and South America. Spoonbills feed on shrimps and fish in shallow waters, sweeping their bills from side to side and scooping up whatever they encounter. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0305

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A roseate spoonbill balancing on one leg is reflected in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0364

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two roseate spoonbills wade in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0365

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two male blue-winged teals are joined by a female in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The teals inhabit marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, wintering as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0366

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A black-necked stilt waits near its nesting mate nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0508

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0507

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Black-necked Stilt sits on its nest in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0506

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A mother gallinule (right) calls her two chicks to enter the algae-covered water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Gallinules, called Moorhens in the Old World, are duck-like swimming birds that constantly bob their heads while moving. They are identified by the prominent red bill with yellow tip and red frontal shield as well as white feathers under the tail, as shown here on the mother. Gallinules range throughout the Americas, from southern Canada to southern South America, inhabiting freshwater marshes and ponds with cattails and other aquatic vegetation. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-99pp0660

On the grounds of Kennedy Space Center, a female Golden-Silk Spider repairs its web. During the day spider hands head downward from the underside of the web near the center. Its web may measure two to three feet across and it repairs the webbing each day, replacing half but never the whole web at one time. The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a 92,000-acre refuge that is a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects KSC-99pp1188

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of Kennedy Space Center, a female Golden-Silk Spider repairs its web. The female can be identified by its brownish-green abdomen with a white spotted irregular pattern. The golden-silk spider repairs the webbing each day, replacing half but never the whole web at one time. Its web may measure two to three feet across. The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a 92,000-acre refuge that is a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects KSC-99pp1187

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A flock of American avocets take time to feed in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Avocets are not commonly seen in the East, but range from Washington and Manitoba south to Texas and California. However, avocets may stray eastward to the Atlantic coast during their southward migration in the fall. Their common habitat is freshwater marshes and shallow marshy lakes. Much like spoonbills, they sweep their bills from side to side along the surface of the water to pick up crustaceans, aquatic insects and floating seeds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects KSC-99pp1522

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A loggerhead shrike perches on a branch in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The loggerhead shrike prefers grasslands, orchards and open areas with scattered trees throughout a range extending from southern Canada to southern Florida and the Gulf Coast. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects KSC-99pp1521

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of nesting bald eagles share a utility pole on Kennedy Parkway North. Nearby is their 11-foot-deep nest, in a pine tree, which has been home to one or more pairs of eagles for two dozen years. It is one of a dozen eagle nests in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects KSC-00pp0041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of nesting bald eagles share a utility pole on Kennedy Parkway North. Nearby is their 11-foot-deep nest, in a pine tree, which has been home to one or more pairs of eagles for two dozen years. It is one of a dozen eagle nests in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects KSC00pp0041

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill squawks at nearby intruders. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-00pp0153

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill searches the water for food. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-00pp0151

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill displays her colorful wings in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-00pp0154

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC00pp0150

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill searches the water for food. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC00pp0151

KENNEY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill (left) displays her colorful wings to the male at right in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-00pp0155

KENNEY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill (left) displays her colorful wings to the male at right in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC00pp0155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, two roseate spoonbills mirror each other as they preen their lipstick-colored feathers. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-00pp0152

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC-00pp0150

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, two roseate spoonbills mirror each other as they preen their lipstick-colored feathers. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC00pp0152

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill squawks at nearby intruders. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC00pp0153

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill displays her colorful wings in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds KSC00pp0154

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Hundreds of birds, especially gray and white pelicans and cormorants, cover the water in the turn basin, located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway. The basin is teeming with fish, attracting the crowd for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth KSC-00pp0197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Birds by the score, especially gray and white pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls, herons and ospreys, flock to the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building in a feeding frenzy as schools of fish fill the waters. In the background is Launch Pad A with Space Shuttle Endeavour waiting for launch on Friday, Feb. 11 for mission STS-99. The basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, which is made up of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. It is called a lagoon because it is a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth KSC00pp0192