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Coolidge with Pam Am flyers, [5/1/27]

Camp counselor Pam Broadston, left, and physical therapist CAPT. Jeanine Gregoire join camper Nichole Lambert in celebrating her eighth birthday. Children's Association for Maximum Potential (CAMP) developed a camp program for handicapped youngsters

LT Pam Powers serves ice cream to children at St. Irminen's Orphanage during a Christmas party given by the 36th Supply Squadron, Bitburg Base

LCOL Thomas E. Reinkober is presented the Legion of Merit by MGEN Max Noah, director, Program Analysis and Evaluation. Looking on is Reinkober's family, from left to right, sons Eric and Brian, wife Pam and Daughter Amy

Senior AIRMAN (SRA) Pam Winsor and Sergeant (SGT) Richard Real, Air Force News Service Europe, edit recent coverage of Exercise REFORGER '86

AIRMAN 1ST Class Pam Rieman, passenger service representative, poses for a photograph on the flight line

Fireman Apprentice Pam Grey practices using an arc welder to fuse metal pieces together aboard the destroyer tender USS SAMUEL GOMPERS (AD-37). The ship is underway off the coast of Baja, Mexico

Fireman Apprentice Pam Grey practices using an arc welder to fuse metal pieces together aboard the destroyer tender USS SAMUEL GOMPERS (AD-37). The ship is underway off the coast of Baja, Mexico

SENIOR AIRMAN Pam Still scores a machine gun target during the DEFENDER CHALLENGE '88 competition

S79E5285 - STS-079 - Name tags for Maj. Pam Elroy and Jeannie Alexander on the aft flight deck

S79E5286 - STS-079 - Name tags for Maj. Pam Elroy and Jeannie Alexander on the aft flight deck

S79E5287 - STS-079 - Name tags for Maj. Pam Elroy and Jeannie Alexander on the aft flight deck

MASTER Sergeant Pam Barnes, a loadmaster on a C-5B Galaxy aircraft based at the 22nd Airlift Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, California points where to place load absorbing boards before a vehicle travels down the ramp. The continued operations are supplying personnel and equipment into the base. This is the relocation of Operation Southern Watch from Dhahran after a terrorist bomb killed 19 Air Force personnel in June

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following the presentation of the Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), a new piece of technology developed through a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnership with industry, to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Director Roy Bridges, Jr., key participants in the partnership pose for a group portrait. They are (from left) Bill Larson, NASA; Dr. Pedro Medelius, INET; Roy Bridges, Jr., KSC Director; Ed Gladney and William Saputo, L-3 Communications; Pam Gillespi, representing Congressman Dave Weldon; and Frank Kinney, Technological Research and Development Authority. The USCA is a key component of the codeveloped Automated Data Acquisition System (ADAS) that measures temperature, pressure and vibration at KSC's launch pads. The breakthrough technology is expected to reduce sensor setup and configuration times from hours to seconds. KSC teamed up with Florida's Technological Research and Development Authority and manufacturer L-3 Communications to produce a system that would benefit the aerospace industry and other commercial markets KSC-97PC1281

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. He and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0900

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. She and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0901

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. He and other crew members Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC00pp0899

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-92 crew line up on the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility after arriving to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). From left are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff and Michael Lopez-Alegria, Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. During the CEIT, the crew will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC00pp0902

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. He and other crew members Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0899

As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities, members of the STS-92 crew check out equipment they will be using on the mission to the International Space Station. At left is Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao, looking at part of the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, a component of the Station and payload on STS-92. Others seen in the photo are Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria (on his back, lower right); Jeff Wisoff (standing in back); and Bill McArthur (bending closer to the Z1 truss). Also taking part in the CIET are Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0903

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. He and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC00pp0900

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-92 crew line up on the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility after arriving to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). From left are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff and Michael Lopez-Alegria, Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. During the CEIT, the crew will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0902

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. She and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur will spend time at SPACEHAB becoming familiar with the payload and equipment they will use on their mission to the International Space Station. Wakata is with the Japanese space agency. The mission payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power; Ku-band communication to support early science capability and U.S. television; and PMA-3 to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A KSC00pp0901

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Bill McArthur (with tool in hand) gets a close look at the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) in the payload bay of orbiter Discovery. He and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs KSC-00pp0916

As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-92 Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (center) check equipment that they will be using on their mission. Boeing workers (second from left and right) look on. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao and Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0912

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Being lowered into the payload bay of Discovery for a closer look at the payload are STS-92 Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao (second from left) and Bill McArthur (far right), accompanied by Boeing workers. In the foreground is the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3. They and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Jeff Wisoff and Michael Lopez-Alegria are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0914

STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy poses at the Shuttle Landing Facility before flying back to Houston. She and other crew members completed their Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, looking over their mission payload and related equipment. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0941

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-92 crew members, along with Boeing workers, look closely at the tools they will be using on their mission. The crew comprises Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0917

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Bill McArthur (with tool in hand) gets a close look at the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 in the payload bay of orbiter Discovery. He and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0915

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities, STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the Japanese space agency, and Pilot Pam Melroy check paperwork in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. At right is a Boeing worker. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria, and Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 (PMA-3), Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0909

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, members of the STS-92 crew take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities. Being lowered into the payload bay of Discovery for a closer look at the payload are Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao (second from left) and Bill McArthur (far right), accompanied by Boeing workers. In the foreground is the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Jeff Wisoff and Michael Lopez-Alegria. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0913

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Being lowered into the payload bay of Discovery for a closer look at the payload are STS-92 Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao (second from left) and Bill McArthur (far right), accompanied by Boeing workers. In the foreground is the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3. They and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Jeff Wisoff and Michael Lopez-Alegria are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0914

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-92 crew look over a tire on the landing gear of orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. From left to right are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff (pointing) and Leroy Chiao, Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the Japanese space agency. Standing behind them is Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria. The crew is at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Others taking part are Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialist Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 (PMA-3), Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0908

Checking out the tools they will be using on the STS-92 mission are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (center), while a Boeing worker looks on. They are in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 where Discovery is being outfitted for the mission. They and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao and Bill McArthur are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0918

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Bill McArthur (with tool in hand) gets a close look at the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 in the payload bay of orbiter Discovery. He and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0915

The STS-92 crew strides across the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility, heading toward the aircraft that will take them back to Houston. They were at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities, looking over their mission payload and related equipment. From left are Mission Specialists Bill McArthur and Jeff Wisoff, Pilot Pam Melroy, Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria, Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the Japanese space agency. Not seen is Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao, who was also at KSC for the CEIT. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0942

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a platform inside the payload bay of Discovery, STS-92 Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao and Bill McArthur take a close look at Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). They and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Jeff Wisoff, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0919

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-92 crew look over a tire on the landing gear of orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. From left to right are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff (pointing) and Leroy Chiao, Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the Japanese space agency. Standing behind them is Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria. The crew is at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Others taking part are Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialist Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 (PMA-3), Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0908

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, members of the STS-92 crew take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities. Being lowered into the payload bay of Discovery for a closer look at the payload are Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao (second from left) and Bill McArthur (far right), accompanied by Boeing workers. In the foreground is the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Jeff Wisoff and Michael Lopez-Alegria. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0913

STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy poses at the Shuttle Landing Facility before flying back to Houston. She and other crew members completed their Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, looking over their mission payload and related equipment. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0941

The STS-92 crew strides across the runway at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility, heading toward the aircraft that will take them back to Houston. They were at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities, looking over their mission payload and related equipment. From left are Mission Specialists Bill McArthur and Jeff Wisoff, Pilot Pam Melroy, Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria, Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the Japanese space agency. Not seen is Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao, who was also at KSC for the CEIT. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC00pp0942

As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-92 Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (second from left) check equipment on orbiter Discovery that they will be using on their mission. At right are Boeing workers. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria, and Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0910

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a platform inside the payload bay of Discovery, STS-92 Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao and Bill McArthur take a close look at Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). They and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Jeff Wisoff, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0919

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities, STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the Japanese space agency, and Pilot Pam Melroy check paperwork in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. At right is a Boeing worker. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria, and Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 (PMA-3), Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) KSC-00pp0909

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Bill McArthur (with tool in hand) gets a close look at the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) in the payload bay of orbiter Discovery. He and other crew members Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Jeff Wisoff, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 on Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, the PMA-3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs KSC00pp0916

As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities, STS-92 Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (center) check equipment on the orbiter Discovery that they will be using on their mission. At right is a Boeing worker. Discovery is in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pam Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao and Bill McArthur. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. Discovery will carry the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, Pressurized Mating Adapter 3, Ku-band Communications System, and Control Moment Gyros (CMGs). KSC-00pp0911

KSC Director Roy Bridges (center) and guests view the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) at the Hypergolic Maintenance Facility (HMF). Looking on next to him (left) is NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Joseph Rothenberg and Pam Gillespie (far right), from Rep. Dave Weldon’s office. The CLCS was declared operational in a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC00pp1245

KSC Director Roy Bridges (center) and guests view the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) at the Hypergolic Maintenance Facility (HMF). Looking on next to him (left) is NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Joseph Rothenberg and Pam Gillespie (far right), from Rep. Dave Weldon’s office. The CLCS was declared operational in a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC-00pp1245

The ribbon is cut and the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) declared operational. Those taking part in the ceremony are (from left) Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Pam Gillespie, from Rep. Dave Weldon's office; Roy Bridges, Kennedy Space Center director; Dave King, director of Shuttle Processing; Retha Hart, deputy associate director, Spaceport Technology Management Office; and Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Program. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC-00pp1244

The ribbon is cut and the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) declared operational. Those taking part in the ceremony are (from left) Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Pam Gillespie, from Rep. Dave Weldon's office; Roy Bridges, Kennedy Space Center director; Dave King, director of Shuttle Processing; Retha Hart, deputy associate director, Spaceport Technology Management Office; and Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Program. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing KSC00pp1244

STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy, at the microphone, waves to the media after introducing the crew. Standing behind him are Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; and Pilot Pam Melroy. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT includes emergency egress training from the orbiter and pad, plus a simulated countdown. The fifth mission to the International Space Station, STS-92 will carry the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, the first of the planned 10 trusses on the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z1 will allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for the solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A. It will be the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC00pp1309

The STS-92 crew spends a few minutes on the tarmac at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility to address the media. At the microphone, Commander Brian Duffy introduces the crew: (from left) Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; and Pilot Pam Melroy. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT includes emergency egress training from the orbiter and pad, plus a simulated countdown. The fifth mission to the International Space Station, STS-92 will carry the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, the first of the planned 10 trusses on the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z1 will allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for the solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A. It will be the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1308

The STS-92 crew spends a few minutes on the tarmac at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility to address the media. At the microphone, Commander Brian Duffy introduces the crew: (from left) Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; and Pilot Pam Melroy. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT includes emergency egress training from the orbiter and pad, plus a simulated countdown. The fifth mission to the International Space Station, STS-92 will carry the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, the first of the planned 10 trusses on the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z1 will allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for the solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A. It will be the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC00pp1308

STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy, at the microphone, waves to the media after introducing the crew. Standing behind him are Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; and Pilot Pam Melroy. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT includes emergency egress training from the orbiter and pad, plus a simulated countdown. The fifth mission to the International Space Station, STS-92 will carry the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, the first of the planned 10 trusses on the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z1 will allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for the solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A. It will be the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1309

During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-92 crew poses for a group photo. Standing, left to right, on the crawlerway ramp are Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata of Japan, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; Pilot Pam Melroy; and Commander Brian Duffy. The TCDT provides emergency egress training, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. In the background is Space Shuttle Discovery. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1329

STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy is ready to take her turn driving the M-113, part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behind her, waiting to take their turn, are (left to right) Mission Specialist Jeff Wisoff, Commander Brian Duffy, and Mission Specialists Bill McArthur and Michael Lopez-Alegria. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1323

As part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, members of the STS-92 crew get instructions about the M-113 they are seated in at Launch Pad 39A. Seen on the left are Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chaio and Koichi Wakata of Japan In the middle, giving the instructions, is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. At right are Commander Brian Duffy (leaning back) and Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria. The other crew members (not seen) are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff and Bill McArthur. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1318

STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy heads down the road driving the M-113, part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department, keeps in voice communication with her as he rides on top. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1324

STS-92 Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao gets into the driver’s side for his turn to drive the M-113, part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behind him are Pilot Pam Melroy (left) and Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria.; The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1325

STS-92 Pilot Pam Melroy heads down the road driving the M-113, part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department, keeps in voice communication with her as he rides on top. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC00pp1324

During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-92 crew poses for a group photo. In the background is Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing, left to right, on the crawlerway ramp are Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata of Japan, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; Pilot Pam Melroy; and Commander Brian Duffy. The TCDT provides emergency egress training, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1330

In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers who have supported mission STS-92 gather for a photo with the crew: (left to right) Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata of Japan, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao; Pilot Pam Melroy; and Commander Brian Duffy. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1331

As part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, members of the STS-92 crew get instructions about the M-113 they are seated in at Launch Pad 39A. Seen on the left are Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chaio and Koichi Wakata of Japan In the middle, giving the instructions, is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. At right are Commander Brian Duffy (leaning back) and Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria. The other crew members (not seen) are Mission Specialists Jeff Wisoff and Bill McArthur. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC00pp1318

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (left) speaks to astronaut Pam Melroy, who piloted the T-38 jet that brought Ivins to KSC. Ivins and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones have returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. STS-98 is Ivins’ fifth space flight. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0226

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Commemorating the 20th anniversary of Space Shuttle program, the State Education Commissioner Charlie Crist (center), visits KSC for the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100.He accompanied 24 students from Ronald McNair Magnet School, Cocoa, and astronaut Sam Durrance for the launch.Standing, left to right, are Pam Biegert; Nicole Waxberg; Jay Burmer, FDOE Director, Central Florida Office; Crist; Durrance; JoAnn Carrin, Deputy Communications Director Office of the Commissioner; and Ronda Federspiel, FDOE, Director of Special Projects. The students were chaperoned by Waxberg, who is a teacher at McNair School. KSC01pp0841

Captain Alfonso Aiello, a tester from Italy, and Pam Metz, a functional analyst for the US Army, discuss test rescheduling and the status between Italy and the United Kingdom switch test during COMBINED ENDEAVOR 2001 in Lager Aulenbach, Germany. This is the largest communications and information systems exercise in the world. The exercise, sponsored by US European Command and hosted by Germany in the spirit of "Partnership for Peace," is held annually to test and document the interoperability of dozens of nations and NATO. There are 37 countries participating this year

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Pam Jackson assigned to 886th Communication Squadron (CS), Sembach Annex, Germany, earns the German shooting medal, the Shutzensnur, a medal worn only by the best marksmen in the German Military

US Air Force (USAF) STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Pam Marshall, Postal Clerk, 409th Air Expeditionary Group (AEG) installs computer equipment at Camp Sarafovo, Bulgaria, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) Captain (CPT) Charles Ericson, 116th Air Control Wing (ACW), gets a hug from his wife Pam while daughters Autumn, and Olivia, wait their turn. CPT Ericson had just returned from deployment in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM to his home base at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia (GA)

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Pam Mitchell, a Crew CHIEF with the 115th Fighter Wing (FW), in Madison, Wisconsin, carries out launch procedures for aircraft prior to deployment

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Pam Mitchell, a Crew CHIEF from the 115th Fighter Wing (FW), in Madison, Wisconsin, carries out launch procedures foran F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft prior to deployment

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Astronaut Pam Melroy speaks to members of the Columbia Reconstruction Team during transfer of debris from the Columbia Debris Hangar to its permanent storage site in the Vehicle Assembly Building. More than 83,000 pieces of debris were shipped to KSC during search and recovery efforts in East Texas. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Astronaut Pam Melroy speaks to members of the Columbia Reconstruction Team during transfer of debris from the Columbia Debris Hangar to its permanent storage site in the Vehicle Assembly Building. More than 83,000 pieces of debris were shipped to KSC during search and recovery efforts in East Texas. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Posing with the plaque dedicated to Columbia Jan. 29, 2004, is astronaut Pam Melroy. The dedication ceremony included the 40-member preservation team gathered in the “Columbia room,” in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The site is a permanent repository of the debris collected in the aftermath of the tragic accident Feb. 1, 2003, that claimed the orbiter and lives of the seven-member crew. Behind Melroy is a piece of the debris.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Posing with the plaque dedicated to Columbia Jan. 29, 2004, are (left to right) United Space Alliance project leader for Columbia reconstruction Jim Comer, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, astronauts Douglas Hurley and Pam Melroy, Center Director Jim Kennedy and NASA Vehicle Manager Scott Thurston. The dedication of the plaque was made in front of the 40-member preservation team in the “Columbia room,” a permanent repository in the Vehicle Assembly Building of the debris collected in the aftermath of the tragic accident Feb. 1, 2003, that claimed the orbiter and lives of the seven-member crew.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla., gather for a photo with NASA representatives standing behind them. At center is astronaut Sam Durrance; on the right is Center Director Jim Kennedy; behind Durrance at left is John Halsema, chief in the Government Relations Office. Behind and right of Kennedy is Steve Lewis, his assistant. Behind the student on the far right is Pam Biegert, chief of KSC’s Education Programs and University Research Office. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. KSC-04pd0712

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Pam Biegert (back to camera), chief of KSC’s Education Programs and University Research Office, praises the costumes of two students who welcomed NASA representatives to Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. At left is astronaut Sam Durrance, and at right is Center Director Jim Kennedy. NASA-KSC officials are visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. KSC-04pd0709

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA-KSC representatives pose with two students in front of Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. From left are Pam Biegert (chief of KSC’s Education Programs and University Research Office), astronaut Sam Durrance, Center Director Jim Kennedy, John Halsema (chief, Government Relations Office), Steve Lewis (assistant to Kennedy), and Mike Rein (division chief, Communications). NASA-KSC officials are visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. KSC-04pd0710

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Lisa Scallon (far left), principal of Immokalee Middle School in Naples, Fla., welcomes astronaut Terry Virts to the school, which is part of NASA’s Explorer Schools (NES) Program. Immokalee and Pine Ridge Middle School are an NES team. Also seen are Lisa Malone (second from left), director, KSC’s External Relations and Business Development directorate, and Pam Biegert, chief of Educational Services at KSC, who both accompanied Center Director Jim Kennedy on the trip. Kennedy is visiting the school to share the for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. He is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. NES establishes a three-year partnership annually between NASA and 50 NASA Explorer Schools teams, consisting of teachers and education administrators from diverse communities nationwide. KSC-04pd2040

Left to right: Secretary of the Air Force, Dr. James R. Roche, 197th Field Artillery Brigade Commander, COL. James Guise, 407th Expeditionary Medical Group Commander, 300 Area Support Group Commander Pam Adams, Tallil Air Base Dutch Air Force Commander, LT. COL. J. von Tilberg, CHIEF of STAFF U.S. Air Force GEN. John P. Jumper, Tallil Air Base Italian Air Force Commander, LT. COL. Giuseppe Di Maio, 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing Commander, Brig Gen Blair Hansen, pose for a group photo at Tallil Air Base, Iraq, on Nov. 10, 2004, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM.(U.S. Air Force PHOTO by TECH. SGT. Maria Bare) (Released)

U.S. Air Force CAPT. Pam Gordon (right), from the 8th Medical Operation Squadron, instructs unit members on how to treat a simulated patient during exercise Beverly High 04-07 at Kunsan Air Base, Korea on Dec. 14, 2004. (USAF PHOTO by STAFF SGT. Alan Port) (Released)

[Hurricane Katrina] New Orleans, LA, 9-17-05 -- Pam Lair and daughter, Megan Harner, return home to search for anything salavageble in their hurricane Katrina flooded home. Most residents are only able to save a few items. This is the first time they have returned home since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. MARVIN NAUMAN/FEMA photo

[Hurricane Katrina/Hurricane Rita] New Orleans, LA, 9-17-05 -- Pam Lair and Daughter Megan Harner, and son Alex return home to look for anything salavageble in their flooded home. Not much survived. This is the first time they have been able to return home since Hurricane Katrina and Rita. MARVIN NAUMAN/FEMA photo

In Gulfport, Mississippi (MS), US Navy (USN) Journalist 3rd Class (JO3) Michael Campbell interviews Gulfport homeowner Pam Rowell, while Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (CVN 75) work on the interior of her house. Twenty-three Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (CVN 75) are part of a community relations team, working side-by-side with civilian volunteers from around the world through Camp Hope

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney and his wife, Lynne, are greeted at the Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, in Florida, after their landing. Behind Mrs. Cheney is NASA Vehicle Manager Scott Thurston. At center is Pam Adams, with External Relations. On the far right is J.T. Jezierski, NASA deputy chief of staff and White House liaison. Cheney and his family flew in to view the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1343

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At right are STS-120 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski (background) and Doug Wheelock (foreground), looking over the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0166

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski takes a look underneath the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0167

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialist Doug Wheelock checks out the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Wheelock and other crew members are familiarizing themselves with the payload. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0161

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski (left) and Doug Wheelock check out the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. They are familiarizing themselves with the payload. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski (left), Doug Wheelock (center) and Paolo Nespoli (right) check out the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Nespoli represents the European Space Agency. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-120 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski checks out the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Parazynski and other crew members are familiarizing themselves with the payload. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski (background) watches Mission Specialist Doug Wheelock work with a wire on the primary payload for the mission: the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Parazynski, Wheelock and other crew members are familiarizing themselves with the payload. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0162

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialist Doug Wheelock (left) gets hands-on experience with equipment earmarked for the mission. The primary payload for mission STS-120 is the U.S. Node 2, another element to be added to the International Space Station. Node 2 will provide a passageway between three station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, and the European Columbus Laboratory. STS-120 is targeted for launch on Sept. 7 with a crew of six, including Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and Mission Specialist Mike Foreman. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0165

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Mission STS-120 Commander Pam Melroy speaks to members of the press and guests during a ceremony to unveil the new name of NASA's Node 2 module, Harmony. The name, Harmony, was chosen from an academic competition involving thousands of students in kindergarten through high school. The Node 2 Challenge required students to learn about the International Space Station, build a scale model of the module, and write an essay explaining their proposed name. This will be the first U.S. piece of the space station named by someone other than a NASA official. Node 2 is a pressurized module that will act as a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and supply spacecraft. It also will be a work platform for the station's robotic arm. The module is scheduled to fly on mission STS-120 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis targeted for later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd0640

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Mission STS-120 Pilot George Zamka (left) and Commander Pam Melroy stand in front of the Node 2 module with it's new name, Harmony, unveiled. The name, Harmony, was chosen from an academic competition involving thousands of students in kindergarten through high school. The Node 2 Challenge required students to learn about the International Space Station, build a scale model of the module, and write an essay explaining their proposed name. This will be the first U.S. piece of the space station named by someone other than a NASA official. Node 2 is a pressurized module that will act as a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and supply spacecraft. It also will be a work platform for the station's robotic arm. The module is scheduled to fly on mission STS-120 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis targeted for later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd0641

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Mission STS-120 Pilot George Zamka (left) and Commander Pam Melroy begin to unveil the Node 2 module's new name, Harmony, as Russ Romanella, director of International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing presides over the ceremony. The name, Harmony, was chosen from an academic competition involving thousands of students in kindergarten through high school. The Node 2 Challenge required students to learn about the International Space Station, build a scale model of the module, and write an essay explaining their proposed name. This will be the first U.S. piece of the space station named by someone other than a NASA official. Node 2 is a pressurized module that will act as a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and supply spacecraft. It also will be a work platform for the station's robotic arm. The module is scheduled to fly on mission STS-120 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis targeted for later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd0637

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Mission STS-120 Pilot George Zamka (left, partially hidden) and Commander Pam Melroy (second from right in group), talk with members of the media and guests after a ceremony to unveil NASA's Node 2 module's new name, Harmony. The name, Harmony, was chosen from an academic competition involving thousands of students in kindergarten through high school. The Node 2 Challenge required students to learn about the International Space Station, build a scale model of the module, and write an essay explaining their proposed name. This will be the first U.S. piece of the space station named by someone other than a NASA official. Node 2 is a pressurized module that will act as a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and supply spacecraft. It also will be a work platform for the station's robotic arm. The module is scheduled to fly on mission STS-120 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis targeted for later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd0642

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Russ Romanella (left), director of International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing, presides over a ceremony to unveil the new name of NASA's Node 2 module, Harmony. With him are Mission STS-120 Commander Pam Melroy and Pilot George Zamka. The name, Harmony, was chosen from an academic competition involving thousands of students in kindergarten through high school. The Node 2 Challenge required students to learn about the International Space Station, build a scale model of the module, and write an essay explaining their proposed name. This will be the first U.S. piece of the space station named by someone other than a NASA official. Node 2 is a pressurized module that will act as a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and supply spacecraft. It also will be a work platform for the station's robotic arm. The module is scheduled to fly on mission STS-120 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis targeted for later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd0639

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Mission STS-120 Pilot George Zamka (left) and Commander Pam Melroy stand in front of the Node 2 module with it's new name, Harmony, unveiled, as Russ Romanella, director of International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing presides over the ceremony. The name, Harmony, was chosen from an academic competition involving thousands of students in kindergarten through high school. The Node 2 Challenge required students to learn about the International Space Station, build a scale model of the module, and write an essay explaining their proposed name. This will be the first U.S. piece of the space station named by someone other than a NASA official. Node 2 is a pressurized module that will act as a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and supply spacecraft. It also will be a work platform for the station's robotic arm. The module is scheduled to fly on mission STS-120 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis targeted for later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd0638

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mission STS-120 crew members familiarize themselves with equipment inside the Space Station Processing Facility during a visit to Kennedy Space Center. Standing from left, are Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Paolo Nespoli (with the European Space Agency), Scott Parazynski and Commander Pam Melroy. In the foreground at left is Mission Specialist Daniel Tani. Other crew members include Pilot George Zamka and Mission Specialists Douglas Wheelock and Clayton Anderson. Mission STS-120 will deliver the Node 2 "Harmony" connecting module to the station. During the mission, Tani and Anderson will transfer to the station and remain as flight engineers for Expedition 15. The mission is tentatively scheduled for August of this year. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0745