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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With a rainbow serving as a backdrop in the sky, space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2734

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the payload canister is ready for another attempt to be lifted to the payload changeout room. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2794

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A view of the adjusted guide shoe attached to the outside of the payload canister on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. A second attempt will be made to lift the canister to the payload changeout room above. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2791

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the payload canister waits for adjusted guide shoes to be attached before being lifted to the payload changeout room for the second time. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2787

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers on the crane prepare to attach adjusted guide shoes onto the outside of the payload canister for a second lift to the payload changeout room. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2788

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers on a crane attach adjusted guide shoes onto the outside of the payload canister for attempt at a second lift to the payload changeout room. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2790

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers on a crane attach adjusted guide shoes onto the outside of the payload canister for attempt at a second lift into the payload changeout room. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2792

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers on a crane have completed attaching adjusted guide shoes onto the outside of the payload canister for attempt at a second lift into the payload changeout room. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2793

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers on a crane attach adjusted guide shoes onto the outside of the payload canister for attempt at a second lift to the payload changeout room. The first attempt encountered problems when Teflon pads on “shoes” attached to the outside of the canister that go onto guide rails to help the canister into the room didn’t fit properly. The two shoes were removed, slightly shaved down so that they would fit into the rails and put back on the canister. The changeout room is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the rotating service structure that supports cargo delivery to the pad and subsequent vertical installation into the shuttle’s payload bay. Launch of Atlantis is targeted for Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd2789

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2976

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2977

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The groundwork is being done in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, for a new Doppler weather radar tower. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2974

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The foundation is laid for a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2975

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3008

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar dome is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3011

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3007

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3012

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar dome is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3010

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar dome is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3009

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At a site near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a radar dome, or radome, is being completed before moving it to its base. It is part of a new Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron, replacing one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction continues on the Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new site will replace one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3029

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction continues on the Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. In the background, left, is the radar dome, or radome, being prepared to lift. In the foreground is the tower being put together for the radome. The new site will replace one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3032

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction continues on the Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. At right is a radar dome, or radome; in the background is the tower being built for the radome. The new site will replace one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3033

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A worker inside the radar dome, or radome, monitors equipment before it is lifted onto its base. The dome is part of a new Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, replacing one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3034

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a crane begins lifting a radar dome, or radome, which is part of a new Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3035

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A worker seals an area of the radar dome, or radome, under construction on the Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new site will replace one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3030

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a crane begins lifting a radar dome, or radome, which is part of a new Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3036

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a crane lifts a steel beam that will be added to the being constructed for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. In the background is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3097

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a worker ties a line to a steel beam that will be added to a tower being constructed for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. In the background is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3095

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, workers are constructing a steel tower for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. At left is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3092

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a crane lifts a steel beam that will be added to the being constructed for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. In the background is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3098

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, workers are constructing a steel tower for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. At right is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3093

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a worker finishes tying a line to a steel beam that will be added to a tower being constructed for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. In the background is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3096

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, workers are constructing a steel tower for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron. At left is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3094

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a crane is being used to lift steel beams for a new Doppler weather radar tower for the 45th Weather Squadron. In the background at left is the radome that will be on top of the tower. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base. It will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The site will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd3091

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, workers help guide the cables on a crane lifting a radome onto concrete blocks. The radome will be lifted onto a steel tower constructed for a Doppler weather radar for the 45th Weather Squadron. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the U.S. Air Force's 45th Space Wing and their customers. The facility will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. Replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, the new radar includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd3118

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, the steel tower for a Doppler weather radar facility for the 45th Weather Squadron is nearly complete. At left is the radome that will go on top of the tower, enclosing the radar. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the U.S. Air Force's 45th Space Wing and their customers. The facility will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. Replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, the new radar includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd3116

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, workers help position a radome onto concrete blocks. The radome will be lifted onto a steel tower constructed for a Doppler weather radar for the 45th Weather Squadron. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the U.S. Air Force's 45th Space Wing and their customers. The facility will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. Replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, the new radar includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd3119

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, a crane is used to position a radome on concrete blocks. The radome will be lifted onto a steel tower constructed for a Doppler weather radar for the 45th Weather Squadron. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the U.S. Air Force's 45th Space Wing and their customers. The facility will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. Replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, the new radar includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd3120

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida, workers help guide the cables on a crane lifting a radome onto concrete blocks. The radome will be lifted onto a steel tower constructed for a Doppler weather radar for the 45th Weather Squadron. The new site replaces one at Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the U.S. Air Force's 45th Space Wing and their customers. The facility will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above and surrounding the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. Replacing what was installed 25 years ago at Patrick Air Force Base, the new radar includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. The radar will be used by forecasters at the USAF 45th Weather Squadron. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd3117

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A crane positions the radome on top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3220

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Joe Buchanan (left), project lead with the ITT Corporation for the 45th Space Wing, supervises the lift of the radome to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3218

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A crane positions the radome on top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3215

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A crane lifts the radome to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3219

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A worker awaits the delivery by crane of the radome to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3213

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Workers watch as the radome is delivered by crane to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3214

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Workers install the radome onto the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3217

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Workers secure the radome to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3216

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The radome is secured atop a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3221

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The radome is secured atop a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3222

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Workers prepare the radome to be lifted by a crane to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3212

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A crane is prepared to lift the radome to the top of a new Doppler weather radar tower being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Fla. The dome houses the weather radar dish and pedestal and protects them from the elements. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads at Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd3211

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Despite the incline, space shuttle Atlantis remains on a level plane as it rolls off Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. First motion was at 6:48 a.m. EDT. The crawler-transporter underneath the mobile launcher platform maintains the level plane through a leveling system designed to keep the top of the space shuttle vehicle vertical. This system also provides the leveling operations required to negotiate the 5-percent ramp leading to the launch pads. Atlantis is rolling back to the Vehicle Assembly Building to await launch on its STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis' targeted launch on Oct. 14 was delayed when a system that transfers science data from the orbiting observatory to Earth malfunctioned on Sept. 27. The new target launch date is under review. The space shuttle is mounted on a Mobile Launcher Platform and will be delivered to the Vehicle Assembly Building atop a crawler transporter. traveling slower than 1 mph during the 3.4-mile journey. The rollback is expected to take approximately six hours. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd3270

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An aerial view of the Operations Support Building II in the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panorama of windows faces the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1570

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The sound suppression system is tested on the mobile launcher platform on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Pad 39B will be the site of the first Ares vehicle launch, including the Ares I-X flight test that is targeted for summer 2009. The mobile launcher platform was handed over to the Constellation Program and modified for the Ares I-X flight test. It is being tested before being moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building for assembly of the Ares I-X rocket. A sound suppression water system is in¬stalled on the pads to protect against damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and mobile launcher plat¬form during a launch. The sound suppression system includes an elevated 290-foot-high water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The water releases just prior to the ignition of the rocket and flows through 7-foot-diameter pipes for about 20 seconds. A torrent of water will flow onto the mobile launcher platform from six large quench nozzles, or “rainbirds,” mounted on its surface. The rainbirds are 12 feet high. The two in the center are 42 inches in diameter; the other four have a 30-inch diameter. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2537

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The sound suppression system is tested on the mobile launcher platform on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Pad 39B will be the site of the first Ares vehicle launch, including the Ares I-X flight test that is targeted for summer 2009. The mobile launcher platform was handed over to the Constellation Program and modified for the Ares I-X flight test. It is being tested before being moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building for assembly of the Ares I-X rocket. A sound suppression water system is in¬stalled on the pads to protect against damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and mobile launcher plat¬form during a launch. The sound suppression system includes an elevated 290-foot-high water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The water releases just prior to the ignition of the rocket and flows through 7-foot-diameter pipes for about 20 seconds. A torrent of water will flow onto the mobile launcher platform from six large quench nozzles, or “rainbirds,” mounted on its surface. The rainbirds are 12 feet high. The two in the center are 42 inches in diameter; the other four have a 30-inch diameter. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2538

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Water cascades over the side of the mobile launcher platform on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The sound suppression system is being tested on the platform. Pad 39B will be the site of the first Ares vehicle launch, including the Ares I-X flight test that is targeted for summer 2009. The mobile launcher platform was handed over to the Constellation Program and modified for the Ares I-X flight test. It is being tested before being moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building for assembly of the Ares I-X rocket. A sound suppression water system is in¬stalled on the pads to protect against damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and mobile launcher plat¬form during a launch. The sound suppression system includes an elevated 290-foot-high water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The water releases just prior to the ignition of the rocket and flows through 7-foot-diameter pipes for about 20 seconds. A torrent of water will flow onto the mobile launcher platform from six large quench nozzles, or “rainbirds,” mounted on its surface. The rainbirds are 12 feet high. The two in the center are 42 inches in diameter; the other four have a 30-inch diameter. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2539

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Early morning light falls on space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It joins space shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2761

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Atlantis atop the mobile launcher platform sits on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At left is the Vehicle Assembly Building. Atlantis has been joined by space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2774

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Endeavour (left) and space shuttle Atlantis are seen on Launch Pads 39B and 39A, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010.Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2763

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Viewed across the lagoon at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttles Atlantis (right) and Endeavour (background left) are seen on Launch Pad 39A and 39B respectively. With the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010, this is expected to be the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during Atlantis' upcoming mission to upgrade NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis is targeted to launch May 12. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-2746

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– On Launch Pad 39B (left) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour has joined space shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A (right). This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Surrounding pad 39B are the lightning towers erected for NASA's Constellation Program, which will use the pad for Ares rocket launches. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2786

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Endeavour (left) and space shuttle Atlantis are seen on Launch Pads 39B and 39A, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2764

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– As dawn begins to brighten the sky over Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is seen bathed in lights from the fixed service structure. Endeavour joins Atlantis, which is on Launch Pad 39A. With the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010, this is expected to be the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2757

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour has joined space shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. In the background is the Atlantic Ocean. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2768

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Viewed from the shoreline at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttles Atlantis (left) and Endeavour (right) are seen on Launch Pad 39A and 39B respectively. With the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010, this is expected to be the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during Atlantis' upcoming mission to upgrade NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis is targeted to launch May 12. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-2747

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Launch Pads 39A and 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida are ablaze with lights before dawn, showing shuttles on both pads. At left is space shuttle Atlantis, poised for the STS-125 mission targeted to launch May 12, and at right is space shuttle Endeavour. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following Atlantis' launch. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Chris Rhodes KSC-2009-2744

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Atlantis (left) and space shuttle Endeavour are seen on Launch Pads 39A and 39B, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Surrounding the pad are the lightning towers erected for NASA's Constellation Program, which will use the pad for Ares rocket launches. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2773

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Seen on Launch Pads 39A and 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida are shuttles on both pads. At left is space shuttle Atlantis, poised for the STS-125 mission targeted to launch May 12, and at right is space shuttle Endeavour. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch May 12 on the STS-125 mission to upgrade NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2755

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– On Launch Pad 39B (left) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour has joined space shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2767

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Sunlight spotlights space shuttle Atlantis (left) and space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pads 39A and 39B, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2766

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Atlantis atop the mobile launcher platform straddles the flame trench on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It is joined by space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2762

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Early dawn showcases Launch Pads 39A and 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida with shuttles on both pads. At left is space shuttle Atlantis, poised for the STS-125 mission targeted to launch May 12, and at right is space shuttle Endeavour. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following Atlantis' launch. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Chris Rhodes KSC-2009-2745

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Atlantis atop the mobile launcher platform straddles the flame trench on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Behind it is the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantis has been joined by space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2772

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttles Atlantis (left) and Endeavour (right) are seen on Launch Pad 39A and 39B respectively. With the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010, this is expected to be the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during Atlantis' upcoming mission to upgrade NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis is targeted to launch May 12. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-2748

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Sunlight spotlights space shuttle Atlantis (left) and space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pads 39A and 39B, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2765

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour has joined space shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. In the background is the Atlantic Ocean. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2769

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Dawn breaks over the Atlantic Ocean behind space shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Atlantis is targeted to launch May 12 on its STS-125 mission. Space shuttle Endeavour sits on Launch Pad 39B, probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2760

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Atlantis (left) and space shuttle Endeavour are seen on Launch Pads 39A and 39B, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Surrounding pad 39B are the lightning towers erected for NASA's Constellation Program, which will use the pad for Ares rocket launches. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2785

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– Space shuttle Atlantis (left) and space shuttle Endeavour are seen on Launch Pads 39A and 39B, respectively, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is probably the final time two shuttles will be on launch pads at the same time with the space shuttle fleet set for retirement in 2010. Surrounding pad 39B are the lightning towers erected for NASA's Constellation Program, which will use the pad for Ares rocket launches. Endeavour will be prepared on the pad for liftoff in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary following space shuttle Atlantis' launch on the STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. After Atlantis is cleared to land, Endeavour will move to Launch Pad 39A for its upcoming STS-127 mission to the International Space Station, targeted to launch June 13. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2771

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A technician works at installing a new window in the Launch Control Center's Firing Room 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of NASA's Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, launched from Kennedy's Launch Pad 39B. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2977

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – New windows are installed in the Launch Control Center's Firing Room 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of NASA's Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, launched from Kennedy's Launch Pad 39B. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2975

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – New windows are installed in the Launch Control Center's Firing Room 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of NASA's Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, launched from Kennedy's Launch Pad 39B. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2976

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An aerial view shows the crawler-transporter at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on the crawlerway that stretches from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pads. Used now to take the shuttles to the launch pads, the crawler also will be used to move the Ares rockets on the mobile launcher, or ML, to the launch pad. A new mobile launcher is being built to launch the Orion crew exploration vehicle and the cargo vehicle. The base is being made lighter than space shuttle mobile launcher platforms so the crawler-transporter can pick up the added load of the 345-foot tower and taller rocket. When the structural portion of the new mobile launcher is complete, umbilicals, access arms, communications equipment and command/control equipment will be installed. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3144

Atlantis and Endeavour on launch pads

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – It's a full house at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida with launch vehicles on both of the center's pads. The towering 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket is newly arrived on Launch Pad 39B, at left, with space shuttle Atlantis filling Launch Pad 39A in the distance. The test rocket left the Vehicle Assembly Building at 1:39 a.m. EDT on its 4.2-mile trek to the pad and was "hard down" on the pad’s pedestals at 9:17 a.m. The transfer of the pad from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program took place May 31. Modifications made to the pad include the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, along with the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system. Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5593

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket awaits liftoff on Launch Pad 39B on its upcoming flight test. In the distance are space shuttle Atlantis on Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A, and the pads and processing facilities on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This is the first time since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired that a vehicle other than the space shuttle has occupied the pad. Modifications to the pad to support the Ares I-X included the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, and the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system. Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5796

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket awaits liftoff on Launch Pad 39B on its upcoming flight test. In the distance are space shuttle Atlantis on Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A, and the pads and processing facilities on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This is the first time since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired that a vehicle other than the space shuttle has occupied the pad. Modifications to the pad to support the Ares I-X included the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, and the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system. Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5788

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – This aerial view of the Vehicle Assembly Building reveals that it's a full house with vehicles on both pads at Launch Complex 39. Space shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff from Pad 39A, at right, while processing of the Ares I-X rocket is almost finished on Pad 39B, at left. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27; space shuttle Atlantis' STS-129 launch to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. For information on the STS-129 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5804

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Excitement builds at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida in anticipation of two launches in less than a month. This aerial view of Launch Complex 39 shows vehicles on both pads. Processing of the Ares I-X rocket is almost finished on Pad 39B, in the foreground, as space shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff from Pad 39A, in the distance. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27; space shuttle Atlantis' STS-129 launch to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. For information on the STS-129 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket awaits liftoff on Launch Pad 39B on its upcoming flight test. In the distance are the pads and processing facilities on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This is the first time since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired that a vehicle other than the space shuttle has occupied the pad. Modifications to the pad to support the Ares I-X included the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, and the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system. Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5787

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, it's a full house with vehicles on both pads at Launch Complex 39. Space shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff from Pad 39A, at left, while processing of the Ares I-X rocket is almost finished on Pad 39B, in the distance. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27; space shuttle Atlantis' STS-129 launch to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. For information on the STS-129 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5725

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis is poised for liftoff on Launch Pad 39A. In the distance are the pads and processing facilities on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Liftoff of Atlantis on its STS-129 mission to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. For information on the STS-129 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts129/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5780

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The launch team is busy at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This aerial view of Launch Complex 39 shows vehicles on both pads. Processing of the Ares I-X rocket is almost finished on Pad 39B, in the foreground, as space shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff from Pad 39A, in the distance. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27; space shuttle Atlantis' STS-129 launch to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. For information on the STS-129 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5726

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis is poised for liftoff on Launch Pad 39A. In the distance are the pads and processing facilities on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Liftoff of Atlantis on its STS-129 mission to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. For information on the STS-129 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts129/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5777

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The launch authority team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles in the Operations Management Room of the Young-Crippen Firing Room, a glass partitioned area overlooking the main floor, in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6093

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The launch support team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles from the Launch Vehicle Data Center in Hangar AE on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. This will be the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6089

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The launch authority team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles in the Operations Management Room of the Young-Crippen Firing Room, a glass partitioned area overlooking the main floor, in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6092

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The prime launch team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles in the Young-Crippen Firing Room in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6095

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The prime launch team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles in the Young-Crippen Firing Room in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6096