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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A flock of white pelicans splash down in the turn basin near one of the launch pads at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. White pelicans winter from Florida and southern California to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons, and usually in colonies. The turn basin was carved out of the Banana River when Kennedy Space Center was built. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. In addition, the refuge supports 19 endangered or threatened wildlife species on Federal or State lists, more than any other single refuge in the U.S. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd0369

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, the KSC rescue team moves an "injured" astronaut toward the open doors of a NASA helicopter, one of five participating in the exercise. The triage area was set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0820

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, KSC personnel representing astronauts are treated at a triage area set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The "injured" workers will be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0811

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, a helicopter leaves with an "injured" astronaut while others are being monitored in the triage area, set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0817

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, the KSC rescue team carries an "injured" astronaut toward one of five helicopters participating in the exercise. The triage area was set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0816

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, a KSC rescue team helps a worker portraying an "injured" astronaut at a triage area set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The "injured" worker may be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0813

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, a triage area set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B, is busy as rescue workers monitor the "injured." KSC personnel portrayed the astronauts. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The "injured" worker may be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0814

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, rescue workers help KSC personnel feigning injuries to a triage area set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The "injured" workers will be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0810

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, rescue workers have set up a triage area at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A, with KSC personnel portraying astronauts and feigning injuries. The participants were helped off the pad and are being taken to the triage site. "Injured" workers will be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0809

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, a KSC rescue team carries a worker portraying an "injured" astronaut toward the triage area set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The "injured" workers will be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0812

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, the KSC rescue team moves an "injured" astronaut toward a NASA helicopter, one of five participating in the exercise. The triage area was set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0819

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During the second stage of a simulated emergency, known as Mode 4, the KSC rescue team monitors one of the "injured" astronauts, being portrayed by KSC personnel. The site is a triage area set up at Helipad 8, located near the fire station between Launch Pads 39A and 39B. The emergency exercise began on Launch Pad 39A. The participants were helped off the pad and taken to the triage site. The "injured" worker may be airlifted to participating area hospitals. The KSC rescue teams are practicing emergency procedures in the unlikely scenario of a mishap on the pad during a launch sequence. The exercises are standard training procedures to assess and prepare emergency personnel, procedures and hardware. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0815

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pegasus barge is towed on the barge channel leading to the Launch Complex 39 Area. The barge's cargo is the external tank prepared for mission STS-118 by the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans. Visible at right is one of the launch pads and the nearby water tower. The destination of the barge is the turn basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank will be offloaded and moved to the VAB. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd0840

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This view of Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, as it moves onto Launch Pad 39A also shows the expendable rocket launch pads in the background on the east side of the Banana River. This is the second rollout for the shuttle. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The mobile service towers on Launch Pads 17-A (left) and 17-B (right) are silhouetted against the pre-dawn sky at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. In the background are the launch gantries. Pad 17-B is the site for the launch of the Dawn spacecraft on June 30. Dawn's mission is to explore two of the asteroid belt's most intriguing and dissimilar occupants: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-07pd1307

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A gopher tortoise searches for food at the edge of a road near Launch Pad 39A. Their primary food sources are low-growing grasses and herbs, with their favorite foods being gopher apple and saw palmetto berries. They will eat the pads, fruits, and flowers of prickly pear cactus as well. They will occasionally also eat bones from dead animals, presumably to get calcium. The gopher tortoise is a cold-blooded reptile that averages 10 inches in length and 9 pounds in weight. Wild tortoises may live from 40 - 60 years, while tortoises in captivity can live more than 100 years. Their range extends from southeastern Louisiana to southeastern South Carolina and throughout all 67 counties in Florida. The gopher tortoise is federally protected as a threatened species except in Florida, where it is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Lands surrounding the Kennedy Space Center are part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Approximately one half of the Refuge's 140,000 acres consists of brackish estuaries and marshes. The remaining lands consist of coastal dunes, scrub oaks, pine forests and flatwoods, and palm and oak hammocks. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1856

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A gopher tortoise searches for food at the edge of a road near Launch Pad 39A. Their primary food sources are low-growing grasses and herbs, with their favorite foods being gopher apple and saw palmetto berries. They will eat the pads, fruits, and flowers of prickly pear cactus as well. They will occasionally also eat bones from dead animals, presumably to get calcium. The gopher tortoise is a cold-blooded reptile that averages 10 inches in length and 9 pounds in weight. Wild tortoises may live from 40 - 60 years, while tortoises in captivity can live more than 100 years. Their range extends from southeastern Louisiana to southeastern South Carolina and throughout all 67 counties in Florida. The gopher tortoise is federally protected as a threatened species except in Florida, where it is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Lands surrounding the Kennedy Space Center are part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Approximately one half of the Refuge's 140,000 acres consists of brackish estuaries and marshes. The remaining lands consist of coastal dunes, scrub oaks, pine forests and flatwoods, and palm and oak hammocks. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1855

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A gopher tortoise searches for food at the edge of a road near Launch Pad 39A. Their primary food sources are low-growing grasses and herbs, with their favorite foods being gopher apple and saw palmetto berries. They will eat the pads, fruits, and flowers of prickly pear cactus as well. They will occasionally also eat bones from dead animals, presumably to get calcium. The gopher tortoise is a cold-blooded reptile that averages 10 inches in length and 9 pounds in weight. Wild tortoises may live from 40 - 60 years, while tortoises in captivity can live more than 100 years. Their range extends from southeastern Louisiana to southeastern South Carolina and throughout all 67 counties in Florida. The gopher tortoise is federally protected as a threatened species except in Florida, where it is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Lands surrounding the Kennedy Space Center are part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Approximately one half of the Refuge's 140,000 acres consists of brackish estuaries and marshes. The remaining lands consist of coastal dunes, scrub oaks, pine forests and flatwoods, and palm and oak hammocks. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1857

[Severe Storms and Flooding] Neodesha, KS, August 8, 2007 - Some of the more than 100 temporary housing units arriving at a FEMA staging area. The units will be placed on pads, connected to utilities and provide emergency housing at a housing site for victims of the severe flooding that affected South Eastern Kansas in July. Leif Skoogfors/FEMA

[Severe Storms and Flooding] Neodesha, KS, August 8, 2007 -- Hattie Stallworth, a FEMA External Affairs Specialist documents some of the more than 100 temporary housing units arriving at a FEMA staging area. The units will be placed on pads, connected to utilities and provide emergency housing for victims of the severe flooding that affected South Eastern Kansas in July. Leif Skoogfors/FEMA

Decommissioned Power Plant Demolition Showing Vibration Pads

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers put together another cabinet to hold equipment that will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1094

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers put together another cabinet to hold equipment that will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1091

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, workers line up the new equipment cabinets. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1096

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, cabinets are being erected to hold equipment that will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1090

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker maneuvers a panel to build another cabinet to hold equipment that will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1093

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A near-empty Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center is ready for the installation of racks of equipment. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1088

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the number of new equipment cabinets increases as workers put the elements together. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1095

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, panels stretch across the floor in preparation for erecting equipment racks. The firing room will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1089

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Firing Room No. 1 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker holds on to a cabinet being put together to hold equipment that will support the future Ares rocket launches as part of the Constellation Program. Future astronauts will ride to orbit on Ares I, which uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle's solid rocket booster, for the first stage. Ares will be launched from Pad 39B, which is being reconfigured from supporting space shuttle launches. The Launch Control Center firing rooms face the launch pads. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1092

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Breaking ground in a mock ceremony for a new weather radar site are (left to right) Project Lead Kim Gwaltney, with SLRSC; 45th Space Wing Operations Group Commander Col. Bernard Gruber; Range Systems Support Manager Walt Danewood; Lt. Col. Stacy Exum with the 45th Space Wing; Lt. Col. Jennifer Alexander with the 45th Space Wing; Harry Earl with Heard Construction and Pat Carr, SLRSC program director with ITT. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-08pd2302

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new weather radar site is dedicated with a mock ground-breaking ceremony. At the podium is Pat Carr, SLRSC program director with ITT. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-08pd2301

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The construction site is leveled for a new weather radar to be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. In the background is the location where a mock ground-breaking ceremony was held. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-08pd2303

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Shortly before midnight Sept. 18, space shuttle Endeavour leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, traveling at less than 1 mph atop a massive crawler-transporter. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2658

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A waning full moon bears witness to space shuttle Endeavour’s rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, traveling at less than 1 mph atop a massive crawler-transporter. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2659

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Shortly before midnight Sept. 18, space shuttle Endeavour leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, traveling at less than 1 mph atop a massive crawler-transporter. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform with the crawler-transporter underneath. First motion was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2661

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Shortly before midnight Sept. 18, space shuttle Endeavour leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, traveling at less than 1 mph atop a massive crawler-transporter. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform with the crawler-transporter underneath. First motion was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2663

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Shortly before midnight Sept. 18, space shuttle Endeavour leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, traveling at less than 1 mph atop a massive crawler-transporter. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform with the crawler-transporter underneath. First motion was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2662

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A waning full moon bears witness to space shuttle Endeavour’s rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, traveling at less than 1 mph atop a massive crawler-transporter. Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform with the crawler-transporter underneath. First motion was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2664

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour rolls onto Launch Pad 39B at NASA'S Kennedy Space Center. The crawler-transporter is straddling the flame trench below. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2672

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An aerial view of the Launch Complex at NASA's Kennedy Space Center shows space shuttles on both pads. At upper right is space shuttle Endeavour, which rolled out Sept. 19, completing the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. In the foreground is space shuttle Atlantis, preparing for its launch on the STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted for Oct. 10. This is the first time since July 2001 that two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2690

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is hard down on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle and mobile launcher platform it sits on rest atop the crawler-transporter that carried them from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2674

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Flags are flying high at the gate for Launch Pad 39B at NASA'S Kennedy Space Center after space shuttle Endeavour’s rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. At left of the shuttle are the open rotating service structure and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2679

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An aerial view south along the seashore shows shuttles on both launch pads. The Atlantic Ocean is a thin line on the horizon. At left is space shuttle Atlantis, preparing for its launch on the STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted for Oct. 10. At right is space shuttle Endeavour, which rolled out Sept. 19, completing the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. This is the first time since July 2001 that two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2694

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Flags are flying high at the gate for Launch Pad 39B at NASA'S Kennedy Space Center after space shuttle Endeavour’s rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. At left of the shuttle are the open rotating service structure and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2680

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is viewed from the air on Launch Pad 39B after the rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. In the background is the Atlantic Ocean. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2689

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An aerial view of the Launch Complex at NASA's Kennedy Space Center shows space shuttles on both pads. At top is space shuttle Endeavour, which rolled out Sept. 19, completing the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. In the foreground is space shuttle Atlantis, preparing for its launch on the STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted for Oct. 10. This is the first time since July 2001 that two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2685

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is framed against a breaking-dawn sky after arriving on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle includes the while solid rocket boosters and orange external fuel tank at left. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2676

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA'S Kennedy Space Center, a waning moon, upper left, cannot compete with the lights surrounding space shuttle Endeavour as it arrives on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle and mobile launcher platform it sits on rest atop the crawler-transporter that carried them from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2673

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An aerial view of the Launch Complex at NASA's Kennedy Space Center shows space shuttle Atlantis, preparing for its launch on the STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted for Oct. 10. The shuttle rests on the mobile launcher platform, which is straddling the flame trench (in the foreground). The lighted structure at right is the fixed service structure, with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. In the background is the Banana River. This is the first time since July 2001 that two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour rolled out earlier to Launch Pad 39B. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2684

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Sitting atop its mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Endeavour welcomes the dawn after arriving on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle includes the while solid rocket boosters and orange external fuel tank. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2677

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is viewed from the air on Launch Pad 39B after the rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2687

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is hard down on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle and mobile launcher platform it sits on rest atop the crawler-transporter that carried them from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2675

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is viewed from the air on Launch Pad 39B after the rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. To the right of the shuttle is the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2688

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center left behind (at left), the crawler-transporter slowly rolls along the crawlerway with space shuttle Endeavour on top. First motion was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey to Launch Pad 39B on Sept. 19 at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-08pd2665

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B is viewed from the air after the rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The shuttle and mobile launcher platform it sits on are atop the crawler-transporter. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2682

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour is viewed from the air on Launch Pad 39B after the rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure and the fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 18. In the background is the Atlantic Ocean. Endeavour completed the 4.2-mile journey at 6:59 a.m. EDT. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2691

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2737

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With a crystal blue Atlantic Ocean in the background, space shuttle Endeavour sits on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2732

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2735

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Atlantis, atop the mobile launcher platform, sits on Launch Pad A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At left of the shuttle is the open rotating service structure with the payload changeout room revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With a rainbow beginning to appear in the sky, space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2728

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2731

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With a rainbow serving as a backdrop in the sky, space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2730

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Clouds serve as a backdrop to frame space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2736

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With a rainbow serving as a backdrop in the sky, space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2729

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at the center. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis’ upcoming mission to repair NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd2733

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A rainbow completes this unique panorama of two space shuttles on the launch pads at the same time, the first time since July 2001. At upper right is STS-126 mission’s space shuttle Endeavour, which rolled out Sept. 19. At left is space shuttle Atlantis, preparing for its launch on the STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, targeted for Oct. 10. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during space shuttle Atlantis' upcoming mission. After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Photo courtesy of NASA. KSC-08pd3013