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This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road on the near side is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The road circles around the Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) at left center. OPF1 and OPF-2 are just below the curving road. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two launch pads, only one visible to the left of the VAB. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the far crawlerway is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana KSC-00pp0727

This aerial photo shows the areas recently opened as part of KSC’s Safe Haven project. The curved road in the center is the newly restored crawlerway leading around the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) and Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) into the VAB high bay 2 (open on the lower right), where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The Safe Haven project will enable the storage of orbiters during severe weather. OPF1 and OPF-2 are at the lower right. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two launch pads. Launch Pad 39A is visible to the left of the crawlerway. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the VAB is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana KSC00pp0728

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road on the near side is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The road circles around the Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) at left center. OPF1 and OPF-2 are just below the curving road. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two launch pads, only one visible to the left of the VAB. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the far crawlerway is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana KSC00pp0727

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), with the Launch Control Center at its right. The curved road on the left in the photo is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC's Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The crawlerway also extends from the east side out to the two launch pads, one visible close to the road on the left and one to the left of the VAB. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the crawlerway is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana. KSC-00PP-0726

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (foreground) which is used to transport Space Shuttles to the pads KSC-00pp0737

This aerial photo shows the areas recently opened as part of KSC’s Safe Haven project. The curved road in the center is the newly restored crawlerway leading around the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) and Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) into the VAB high bay 2 (open on the lower right), where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The Safe Haven project will enable the storage of orbiters during severe weather. OPF1 and OPF-2 are at the lower right. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two launch pads. Launch Pad 39A is visible to the left of the crawlerway. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the VAB is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana KSC-00pp0728

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road on the near side is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two Space Shuttle launch pads. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the far crawlerway is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana KSC00pp0735

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (right) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building (background) to the pads KSC-00pp0738

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle processing. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road in the foreground is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The road circles around the Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) at right center. OPF1 and OPF-2 are just above the curving road. On the left of the VAB, the crawlerway also extends from high bays 1 and 3, past the Launch Control Center, out to the two Shuttle launch pads KSC-00pp0733

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (left) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pads. Pad A can be seen in the background. KSC-00PP-0741

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (left) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pads. Pad A can be seen in the background. KSC-92PC-2259

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road on the near side is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two Space Shuttle launch pads. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean KSC00pp0734

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road on the near side is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two Space Shuttle launch pads. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean KSC-00pp0734

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (right) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building (background) to the pads KSC00pp0738

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road on the near side is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter currently sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The crawlerway also extends from the east side of the VAB out to the two Space Shuttle launch pads. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the far crawlerway is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana KSC-00pp0735

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At 6:30 a.m. EDT an aerial view captures a first in Space Shuttle history: a fully stacked Shuttle - Atlantis - is rolling into the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) high bay 2 on the building's west side (center of photo). The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway (circling to the left) have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle fliglht hardware more storage space and protection - "Safe Haven" - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis, the twin solid rocket boosters and external tank begain moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. The 6-million pound crawler transporter carried the Mobile Launcher Platform and Space Shuttle around the north side of the VAB and into high bay 2. To the right of the VAB is the turn basin. In the background can be seen both Launch Pads with the Atlantic Ocean behind them. After the successful "Safe Haven" fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8. KSC-00pp1109

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At 6:30 a.m. EDT an aerial view captures a first in Space Shuttle history: a fully stacked Shuttle - Atlantis - is rolling into the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) high bay 2 on the building's west side (center of photo). The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway (circling to the left) have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle fliglht hardware more storage space and protection - "Safe Haven" - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis, the twin solid rocket boosters and external tank begain moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. The 6-million pound crawler transporter carried the Mobile Launcher Platform and Space Shuttle around the north side of the VAB and into high bay 2. To the right of the VAB is the turn basin. In the background can be seen both Launch Pads with the Atlantic Ocean behind them. After the successful "Safe Haven" fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8. KSC00pp1109

Cloudy skies form a backdrop for Launch Pads 39B (left) and 39A (foreground). Space Shuttle Discovery waits on top of the pad for its launch Oct. 5 to the International Space Station. Between the pads can be seen the 300,000-gallon water tank that provides water for the sound suppression system during launch. KSC-00PP-1435

Even in this aerial view at KSC, the Vehicle Assembly Building is imposing. In front of it is the Launch Control Center. In the background is the Rotation/Processing Facility, next to the Banana Creek. In the foreground is the Saturn Causeway that leads to Launch Pads 39A and 39B. KSC-00PP-1432

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- This aerial photo captures Launch Pads 39B (left) and 39A (right). Space Shuttle Discovery waits on pad 39A for launch on mission STS-92 Oct. 5, 2000. The ball-shaped structures at left of the pads are storage tanks of the cryogenic liquid propellants for the orbiter’s main engines KSC00pp1301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- This aerial photo captures Launch Pads 39B (left) and 39A (right). Space Shuttle Discovery waits on pad 39A for launch on mission STS-92 Oct. 5, 2000. The ball-shaped structures at left of the pads are storage tanks of the cryogenic liquid propellants for the orbiter’s main engines KSC-00pp1301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour inches its way to Launch Pad 39B via the crawlerway that leads from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The Shuttle is on the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) which is atop the crawler-transporter, moving on four double-tracked crawlers. The maximum speed of the loaded transporter is 1 mph. To the left and right of the Space Shuttle can be seen both launch pads, 39B and 39A respectively. Endeavour is scheduled to be launched Nov. 30 at 10:01 p.m. EST on mission STS-97, the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections KSC-00pp1624

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour inches its way to Launch Pad 39B via the crawlerway that leads from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The Shuttle is on the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) which is atop the crawler-transporter, moving on four double-tracked crawlers. The maximum speed of the loaded transporter is 1 mph. To the left and right of the Space Shuttle can be seen both launch pads, 39B and 39A respectively. Endeavour is scheduled to be launched Nov. 30 at 10:01 p.m. EST on mission STS-97, the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections KSC00pp1624

MASTER Sergeant Bill Gann, USAF, sprays heavy-duty slvent while AIRMAN First Class Sean Blanchard, USAF, drives a sweeper fitted with scrubbing pads t clean stains ff the hangar flr at the US Air Frce detachment, Istres Air Base, France. MSGT Gann and A1C Blanchard are tw f a fur-man civil engineer team frm 3rd Civil Engineers, Elmendrf Air Frce Base, Alaska, deplyed, as part f JOINT FORGE, t the 16th Expeditinary Operatins Grup, a small US Air Frce unit lcated n the French air base. "The United States has agreed t prvide a frce f apprximately 6,900 U.S. Service member t help maintain a capable military frce in Bsnia-Herzegvina. N timetable fr the duratin...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Launch Pads 39A (foreground) and 39B are both seen in this photo, each with a Shuttle in place. Pad 39A holds Space Shuttle Discovery, which rolled out July 2 to be prepared for launch on mission STS-105 in August. Pad 39B holds Space Shuttle Atlantis, which is scheduled to launch Thursday, July 12, on mission STS-104. At right are the 290-foot water tanks that provide 300,000 gallons of water during liftoff. They are part of the sound suppression water system at each pad KSC01padig238

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Space Shuttle Discovery (foreground) and Space Shuttle Atlantis (background) both stand ready on their Launch Pads ( 39A and 39B respectively). Space Shuttle Discovery rolled out July 2 to be prepared for launch on mission STS-105 in August. Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch Thursday, July 12, on mission STS-104. Towering above each Shuttle on the left is the 80-foot lightning rod that helps protect each Shuttle from lightning strikes KSC01padig243

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery (foreground) and Space Shuttle Atlantis (background) both stand ready on their Launch Pads ( 39A and 39B respectively). Space Shuttle Discovery rolled out July 2 to be prepared for launch on mission STS-105 in August. Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch Thursday, July 12, on mission STS-104. Towering above each Shuttle on the left is the 80-foot lightning rod that helps protect each Shuttle from lightning strikes. At right are the 290-foot water tanks that provide 300,000 gallons of water during liftoff. They are part of the sound suppression water system at each pad KSC-01pp1247

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery (foreground) and Space Shuttle Atlantis (background) both stand ready on their Launch Pads ( 39A and 39B respectively). Space Shuttle Discovery rolled out July 2 to be prepared for launch on mission STS-105 in August. Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch Thursday, July 12, on mission STS-104. Towering above each Shuttle on the left is the 80-foot lightning rod that helps protect each Shuttle from lightning strikes KSC-01pp1248

An aerial view of the Florida coast line showing launch pads of Cape Canaveral with the Space Shuttle Endeavor on the top pad prior to launch

Special Forces Group (SFG) soldiers of "C" Company, 1ST Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), armed with 5.56mm M4 Carbines and equipped with interceptor body armor, knee pads, use tactical satellite telephones, while conducting a search for suspected Taliban in the city of Naray, in support of ENDURING FREEDOM

Soldiers of "C" Company, 1ST Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), armed with 5.56mm M4 Carbines and equipped with interceptor body armor, knee pads, use tactical satellite telephones, while conducting a search for suspected Taliban in the city of Naray, in support of ENDURING FREEDOM

Soldiers of "C" Company, 1ST Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), armed with 5.56mm M4 Carbines and equipped with interceptor body armor, knee pads, use tactical satellite telephones, while conducting a search for suspected Taliban in the city of Naray, in support of ENDURING FREEDOM

Soldiers of "C" Company, 1ST Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), armed with 5.56mm M4 Carbines and equipped with interceptor body armor, knee pads, use tactical satellite telephones, while conducting a search for suspected Taliban in the city of Naray, in support of ENDURING FREEDOM

Trees camouflage two soldiers of "C" Company, 1ST Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), armed with 5.56mm M4 Carbines and equipped with interceptor body armor and knee pads, conducting a search for suspected Taliban in the city of Naray, in support of ENDURING FREEDOM

US Marine Corps (USMC) Captain (CAPT) Justin W. Eggstaff and First Lieutenant (1LT) Matt Sticksel, pilots from Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 (HMLA-369), Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Camp Pendleton, California, fly an AH-1W Super Cobra over the helo pads to clear it of sand, at Ali Asleem Air Base, Kuwait, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. (Substandard image)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This view shows much of the Launch Complex 39 Area stretching beyond the Turn Basin in the foreground. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, with the starting and endpoint of the crawlerway that leads to both launch pads. The low building attached to the VAB is the Launch Control Center. At center left is the Operations and Support Building. At upper right can be seen the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Surrounding waters are part of Banana Creek. Photo credit: NASA KSC-03pd2224

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – This aerial view shows Launch Complex 39 Area. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building. On the horizon at the far left is Launch Pad 39B; to the right is Launch Pad 39A. The crawlerway can be seen stretching from the VAB toward Pad A. Waters of the Banana Creek and Banana River surround the pads. At center right is the Turn Basin. 03pd2202

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – This view shows much of the Launch Complex 39 Area stretching beyond the Turn Basin in the foreground. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, with the starting and endpoint of the crawlerway that leads to both launch pads. The low building attached to the VAB is the Launch Control Center. At center left is the Operations and Support Building. At upper right can be seen the Runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Surrounding waters are part of Banana Creek. 03pd2224

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – This view shows much of the Launch Complex 39 Area looking north. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building. Other buildings surrounding it are (counter clockwise from left) the Orbiter Processing Facility, Multi-Function Facility, Operations Support Building and Launch Control Center (next to VAB). The crawlerway leads from the VAB toward the launch pads. In the background are the waters of the Banana Creek. 03pd2225

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crawler transporter slowly moves the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP), carrying a set of twin solid rocket boosters, away from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in support of engineering analysis vibration tests on the crawler and MLP. On either side of the boosters on the horizon can be seen the two launch pads. The crawler is moving at various speeds up to 1 mph in an effort to achieve vibration data gathering goals as it leaves the VAB and then returns. The boosters are braced at the top for stability. The primary purpose of these rollout tests is to gather data to develop future maintenance requirements on the transport equipment and the flight hardware. Various parts of the MLP and crawler transporter have been instrumented with vibration data collection equipment.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) number 3 and a set of twin solid rocket boosters bolted to it, atop the crawler-transporter, crawl to the intersection in the crawlerway in support of the second engineering analysis vibration test on the crawler and MLP. In the background are Launch Pads 39A (right) and 39B (left). The crawler is moving at various speeds up to 1 mph in an effort to achieve vibration data gathering goals as it leaves the VAB, travels toward Launch Pad 39A and then returns. The boosters are braced at the top for stability. The primary purpose of these rollout tests is to gather data to develop future maintenance requirements on the transport equipment and the flight hardware. Various parts of the MLP and crawler transporter have been instrumented with vibration data collection equipment.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two control towers are seen at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, the old one in front and the nearly completed new tower in back. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new control tower is nearing completion at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. It will replace the old tower in use since 1987. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new control tower is nearing completion at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. It will replace the old tower in use since 1987. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The existing control tower seen here at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility is being replaced. In use since 1987, the old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Karen Holloway-Adkins, KSC wildlife specialist, searches the Banana River for a grass specimen. In the background is one of the launch pads. The biologist is studying the life history of sea turtles, especially what they eat, where they lay their eggs and what factors might harm their survival. On the boat trip she is also monitoring the growth of sea grasses and algae and the water quality of estuaries and lagoons used by sea turtles and other aquatic wildlife.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Beach House, Congressman Tom Feeney (center) relaxes after his walk on Brevard County’s beach north of the launch pads. With him are William Sample (left), president of Space Gateway Support at KSC; Stan Starr, with Dynamac Corp.; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs at KSC; and Jim Hattaway, associate director of KSC. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. KSC-04pd0327

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Water is released onto the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) on Launch Pad 39A at the start of a water sound suppression test. Workers and the media (left) are on hand to witness the rare event. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1074

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1065

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1062

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are being released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. Because of the unusual event, media and workers watch from nearby vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (left). This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1068

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. Because of the unusual event, media and workers watch from nearby vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (left). This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released for launch just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1066

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (bottom right and left) on Launch Pad 39A, workers and the media look down upon the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at the start of a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1072

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (left) on Launch Pad 39A, workers and the media look down upon the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) waiting for the start of a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1071

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some water remains on the surface of the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) on Launch Pad 39A after a water sound suppression test. Workers and the media (left) were on hand to witness the rare event. This test was conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1076

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A crimson and gold sunrise over the Central Florida coast begins illuminating Launch Pad 39A, where a water sound suppression test is to take place. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter’s three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1077

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are being released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. Because of the unusual event, media and workers watch from nearby vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (left). This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1069

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Water recedes from the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) on Launch Pad 39A after the water sound suppression test. Workers and the media (left) were on hand to witness the rare event. This test was conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1075

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Water is released onto the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) on Launch Pad 39A at the start of a water sound suppression test. Workers and the media (left) are on hand to witness the rare event. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1073

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (left) on Launch Pad 39A, workers and the media look down upon the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) waiting for the start of a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1070

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1064

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1063

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- For the fourth time in Space Shuttle Program history, 350,000 gallons of water are being released on a Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at Launch Pad 39A during a water sound suppression test. Because of the unusual event, media and workers watch from nearby vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (left). This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1067

US Air Force (USAF) members of the 407th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron (ECES), work late into the night in order to lay concrete pads for foundations for Logistics Readiness Squadron (LRS) work centers at Tallil Air Base (AB), Iraq (IRQ), during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) members of the 407th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron (ECES), work late into the night in order to lay concrete pads for foundations for Logistics Readiness Squadron (LRS) work centers at Tallil Air Base (AB), Iraq (IRQ), during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) members of the 407th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron (ECES), work late into the night in order to lay concrete pads for foundations for Logistics Readiness Squadron (LRS) work centers at Tallil Air Base (AB), Iraq (IRQ), during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, NASCAR Busch Series race driver Tim Fedewa stands underneath Discovery. Fedewa is on a tour of KSC for the Speed Channel TV show “NBS 24/7,” which is devoted to NASCAR. Other sites on his tour are the Launch Control Center, Vehicle Assembly Building and one of the launch pads. KSC-04pd1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - These pristine sand dunes near the launch pads at KSC are gently washed by the calm blue Atlantic Ocean. Sea oats stand like sentinels on the dunes, which are part of the Canaveral National Seashore, managed by the National Wildlife Service. KSC-04pd1634

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The calm blue ocean near the launch pads at KSC beckons. The sand dunes facing the Atlantic Ocean spill pink flowers down its banks. The vegetation helps prevent the dunes from eroding. The beach is part of the Canaveral National Seashore, managed by the National Wildlife Service. KSC-04pd1632

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - These pristine sand dunes near the launch pads at KSC are gently washed by the calm blue Atlantic Ocean. The beach is part of the Canaveral National Seashore, managed by the National Wildlife Service. KSC-04pd1633

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Security escort leads the way as this Boeing Delta IV first stage heads to the Horizontal Integration Facility at Launch Complex 37, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Two of the launch pads on Cape Canaveral’s coast can be seen in the background. Two rockets were shipped by barge from Decatur, Ala., to Port Canaveral and offloaded onto Elevating Platform Transporters. A Boeing Delta IV will be used for the December launching of the GOES-N weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. The GOES-N is the first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P. This satellite will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric “triggers” of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements. KSC-04pd1669

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Atlantis’ wheels are raised into their wheel bays in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1696

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to close the nose wheel doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1689

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Atlantis’ wheels are raised into their wheel bays in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1695

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare the wheel bay to stow Atlantis’ landing gear in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1694

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to close the nose wheel doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1690

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to stow the landing gear on the orbiter Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1693

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to close the nose wheel doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1691

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare the orbiter Atlantis and related equipment for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1688

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to stow the landing gear on the orbiter Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1692

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility cover up areas of Atlantis with plastic, preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1710

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1703

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility cover up areas of Atlantis, preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1708

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility unwrap plastic for use in covering equipment as part of preparations for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1707

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility cover up areas of Atlantis with plastic, preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1709

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers cover with plastic the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other modules and equipment are being covered as well. Workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1713

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, workers prepare to close the payload bay doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1698

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, workers prepare to close the payload bay doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1697

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1702

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1700

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, modules wrapped in plastic line one wall. The modules and equipment are being covered in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. KSC workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1715

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Atlantis’ payload bay doors are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1699

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility finish Hurricane preparations on the payload bay doors of Atlantis. Preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday, workers also powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1711

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a worker checks out part of Atlantis after payload bay doors were closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1701

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker wraps equipment in plastic in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. The various modules in the SSPF, such as the Japanese Experiment Module, U.S. Node 2 and Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules, are being covered as well. KSC workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1717

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers cover with plastic the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Donatello in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other modules and equipment are being covered as well. Workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1714

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1704

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers cover with plastic the U.S. Node 2 in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other modules and equipment are being covered as well. Workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1712

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, modules and equipment are being covered in plastic in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. KSC workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1716

After heavy use, these model rocket launch pads sit in storage at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina (SC), to be used for the next STAREBASE rocket experiment. Students at MCAS Beaufort are participating in STARBASE, a Department of Defense (DOD)-funded community service program focused on enhancing math, science and goal-setting skills