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Rare view of two space shuttles on adjacent KSC Launch Complex (LC) 39 pads

Earth observations taken during STS-77 mission

STS-83 Payload Specialist Gregory T. Linteris, Mission Specialist Janice E. Voss, and Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch participate in emergency egress training at Launch Complex 39A during the crew's <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/40-97.htm">Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT).</a> They are seen here in one of the pads' seven <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/nasafact/pads.htm#emergenc">slidewire baskets.</a KSC-97pc455

In this aerial view, The News Center sits beyond a large parking lot, on a hill at the northeastern end of the Launch Complex 39 Area , next to the turn basin (at left). From left, the grandstand faces the launch pads several miles away on the Atlantic seashore; behind it, the television studio is the site of media conferences; next, the large white-roofed building is the hub of information and activity for press representatives. Lined up on the right of the Press Site are various buildings and trailers, home to major news networks. The parking lot can accommodate the hundreds of media personnel who attend Space Shuttle launches KSC-98pc1045

Just east of Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39, Pads A & B (Pad 39B is seen upper left), sea-oat-covered sand dunes along the Atlantic Ocean show the ravaging effects of wind and high water from Hurricane Floyd as it passed along the East Coast of Florida, Sept. 14-15. At a weather tower located between Shuttle Launch Pad 39A and Launch Complex 41, the highest winds recorded during the superstorm were 91 mph from the NNW at 4:50 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 15. The maximum sustained winds were recorded at 66 mph. The highest amount of rain recorded at KSC was 2.82 inches as the eye of Hurricane Floyd passed 121 miles east of Cape Canaveral at 4 a.m. Wednesday. A preliminary review of conditions at the Kennedy Space Center was positive after the worst of Hurricane Floyd passed. There appeared to be no major damage to NASA assets, including the launch pads, the four Space Shuttle Orbiters, and flight hardware KSC-99pp1122

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1172

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1171

An aerial view of Launch Complex 39 area shows the Vehicle Assembly Building (center), with the Launch Control Center on its right. On the west side (lower end) are (left to right) the Orbiter Processing Facility, Process Control Center and Operations Support Building. Looking east (upper end) are Launch Pads 39-A (right) and 39-B (just above the VAB). The crawlerway stretches between the VAB and the launch pads toward the Atlantic Ocean, seen beyond them. At right is the turn basin where new external tanks are brought via ship, shown at its offloading site. KSC-99PP-1213

An aerial view of Launch Complex 39 Area shows the Vehicle Assembly Building (center), surrounded by (right) the Launch Control Center, (lower area, left to right) the Orbiter Processing Facility, Process Control Center and Operations Support Building. Looking toward the Atlantic Ocean (top) can be seen Launch Pads 39-A (right) and 39-B. The crawlerway stretches between the VAB and the launch pads. To the right of the crawlerway is the turn basin where new external tanks are brought from Louisiana via ship. The road bordering the buildings is Kennedy Parkway North. KSC-99PP-1214

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center arrives at Port Canaveral. They were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. The transporters are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC00pp0083

The first of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center arrives at Port Canaveral. They were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. The transporters are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC00pp0082

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center arrives at Port Canaveral. In the background is a cruise ship docked at the Port. The transporters were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. They are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC00pp0084

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center sits on the dock at Port Canaveral. In the background is a cruise ship docked at the Port. The transporters were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. They are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC-00pp0085

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center sits on the dock at Port Canaveral. In the background is a cruise ship docked at the Port. The transporters were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. They are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC-00pp0086

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center sits on the dock at Port Canaveral. In the background is a cruise ship docked at the Port. The transporters were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. They are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC00pp0086

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center sits on the dock at Port Canaveral. In the background is a cruise ship docked at the Port. The transporters were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. They are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC00pp0085

The first of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center arrives at Port Canaveral. They were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. The transporters are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC-00pp0082

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center arrives at Port Canaveral. They were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. The transporters are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC-00pp0083

One of two new payload transporters for Kennedy Space Center arrives at Port Canaveral. In the background is a cruise ship docked at the Port. The transporters were shipped by barge from their manufacturer, the KAMAG Company of Ulm, Germany. They are used to carry spacecraft and International Space Station elements from payload facilities to and from the launch pads and orbiter hangars. Each transporter is 65 feet long and 22 feet wide and has 24 tires divided between its two axles. The transporter travels 10 miles per hour unloaded, 5 miles per hour when loaded; it weighs up to 172,000 pounds when the canister with payloads rides atop. The transporters will be outfitted with four subsystems for monitoring the environment inside the canister during the payload moves: the Electrical Power System, Environmental Control System, Instrumentation and Communications System, and the Fluids and Gases System. Engineers and technicians are being trained on the transporter's operation and maintenance. The new transporters are replacing the 20-year-old existing Payload Canister Transporter system KSC-00pp0084

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (foreground) which is used to transport Space Shuttles to the pads KSC00pp0737

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle processing. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road in the foreground is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The road circles around the Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) at right center. OPF1 and OPF-2 are just above the curving road. On the left of the VAB, the crawlerway also extends from high bays 1 and 3, past the Launch Control Center, out to the two Shuttle launch pads KSC00pp0733

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle launches. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), with the Launch Control Center at its right. The curved road on the left in the photo is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2, where a mobile launcher platform/crawler-transporter sits. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC's Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The crawlerway also extends from the east side out to the two launch pads, one visible close to the road on the left and one to the left of the VAB. In the distance is the Atlantic Ocean. To the right of the crawlerway is the turn basin, into which ships tow the barge for offloading new external tanks from Louisiana. KSC-00PP-0726

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (foreground) which is used to transport Space Shuttles to the pads KSC-00pp0737

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (right) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building (background) to the pads KSC-00pp0738

This aerial photo captures many of the facilities involved in Space Shuttle processing. At center is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The curved road in the foreground is the newly restored crawlerway leading into the VAB high bay 2. The road restoration and high bay 2 are part of KSC’s Safe Haven project, enabling the storage of orbiters during severe weather. The road circles around the Orbiter Processing Facility 3 (OPF-3) at right center. OPF1 and OPF-2 are just above the curving road. On the left of the VAB, the crawlerway also extends from high bays 1 and 3, past the Launch Control Center, out to the two Shuttle launch pads KSC-00pp0733

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (left) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pads. Pad A can be seen in the background. KSC-00PP-0741

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (right) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building (background) to the pads KSC00pp0738

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (left) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pads. Pad A can be seen in the background. KSC-92PC-2259

Even in this aerial view at KSC, the Vehicle Assembly Building is imposing. In front of it is the Launch Control Center. In the background is the Rotation/Processing Facility, next to the Banana Creek. In the foreground is the Saturn Causeway that leads to Launch Pads 39A and 39B. KSC-00PP-1432

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Space Shuttle Discovery (foreground) and Space Shuttle Atlantis (background) both stand ready on their Launch Pads ( 39A and 39B respectively). Space Shuttle Discovery rolled out July 2 to be prepared for launch on mission STS-105 in August. Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch Thursday, July 12, on mission STS-104. Towering above each Shuttle on the left is the 80-foot lightning rod that helps protect each Shuttle from lightning strikes KSC01padig243

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery (foreground) and Space Shuttle Atlantis (background) both stand ready on their Launch Pads ( 39A and 39B respectively). Space Shuttle Discovery rolled out July 2 to be prepared for launch on mission STS-105 in August. Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch Thursday, July 12, on mission STS-104. Towering above each Shuttle on the left is the 80-foot lightning rod that helps protect each Shuttle from lightning strikes KSC-01pp1248

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This view shows much of the Launch Complex 39 Area stretching beyond the Turn Basin in the foreground. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, with the starting and endpoint of the crawlerway that leads to both launch pads. The low building attached to the VAB is the Launch Control Center. At center left is the Operations and Support Building. At upper right can be seen the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Surrounding waters are part of Banana Creek. Photo credit: NASA KSC-03pd2224

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – This view shows much of the Launch Complex 39 Area stretching beyond the Turn Basin in the foreground. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, with the starting and endpoint of the crawlerway that leads to both launch pads. The low building attached to the VAB is the Launch Control Center. At center left is the Operations and Support Building. At upper right can be seen the Runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Surrounding waters are part of Banana Creek. 03pd2224

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – This view shows much of the Launch Complex 39 Area looking north. At center is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building. Other buildings surrounding it are (counter clockwise from left) the Orbiter Processing Facility, Multi-Function Facility, Operations Support Building and Launch Control Center (next to VAB). The crawlerway leads from the VAB toward the launch pads. In the background are the waters of the Banana Creek. 03pd2225

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) number 3 and a set of twin solid rocket boosters bolted to it, atop the crawler-transporter, crawl to the intersection in the crawlerway in support of the second engineering analysis vibration test on the crawler and MLP. In the background are Launch Pads 39A (right) and 39B (left). The crawler is moving at various speeds up to 1 mph in an effort to achieve vibration data gathering goals as it leaves the VAB, travels toward Launch Pad 39A and then returns. The boosters are braced at the top for stability. The primary purpose of these rollout tests is to gather data to develop future maintenance requirements on the transport equipment and the flight hardware. Various parts of the MLP and crawler transporter have been instrumented with vibration data collection equipment.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two control towers are seen at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, the old one in front and the nearly completed new tower in back. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new control tower is nearing completion at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. It will replace the old tower in use since 1987. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The existing control tower seen here at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility is being replaced. In use since 1987, the old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new control tower is nearing completion at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. It will replace the old tower in use since 1987. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Karen Holloway-Adkins, KSC wildlife specialist, searches the Banana River for a grass specimen. In the background is one of the launch pads. The biologist is studying the life history of sea turtles, especially what they eat, where they lay their eggs and what factors might harm their survival. On the boat trip she is also monitoring the growth of sea grasses and algae and the water quality of estuaries and lagoons used by sea turtles and other aquatic wildlife.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Beach House, Congressman Tom Feeney (center) relaxes after his walk on Brevard County’s beach north of the launch pads. With him are William Sample (left), president of Space Gateway Support at KSC; Stan Starr, with Dynamac Corp.; Lisa Malone, director of External Affairs at KSC; and Jim Hattaway, associate director of KSC. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. KSC-04pd0327

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, NASCAR Busch Series race driver Tim Fedewa stands underneath Discovery. Fedewa is on a tour of KSC for the Speed Channel TV show “NBS 24/7,” which is devoted to NASCAR. Other sites on his tour are the Launch Control Center, Vehicle Assembly Building and one of the launch pads. KSC-04pd1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - These pristine sand dunes near the launch pads at KSC are gently washed by the calm blue Atlantic Ocean. Sea oats stand like sentinels on the dunes, which are part of the Canaveral National Seashore, managed by the National Wildlife Service. KSC-04pd1634

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - These pristine sand dunes near the launch pads at KSC are gently washed by the calm blue Atlantic Ocean. The beach is part of the Canaveral National Seashore, managed by the National Wildlife Service. KSC-04pd1633

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The calm blue ocean near the launch pads at KSC beckons. The sand dunes facing the Atlantic Ocean spill pink flowers down its banks. The vegetation helps prevent the dunes from eroding. The beach is part of the Canaveral National Seashore, managed by the National Wildlife Service. KSC-04pd1632

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Security escort leads the way as this Boeing Delta IV first stage heads to the Horizontal Integration Facility at Launch Complex 37, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Two of the launch pads on Cape Canaveral’s coast can be seen in the background. Two rockets were shipped by barge from Decatur, Ala., to Port Canaveral and offloaded onto Elevating Platform Transporters. A Boeing Delta IV will be used for the December launching of the GOES-N weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. The GOES-N is the first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P. This satellite will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric “triggers” of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements. KSC-04pd1669

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Atlantis’ wheels are raised into their wheel bays in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1696

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to close the nose wheel doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1689

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Atlantis’ wheels are raised into their wheel bays in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1695

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare the wheel bay to stow Atlantis’ landing gear in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1694

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to close the nose wheel doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1690

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to close the nose wheel doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1691

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to stow the landing gear on the orbiter Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1693

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare the orbiter Atlantis and related equipment for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing their payload bay doors and stowing their landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1688

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility prepare to stow the landing gear on the orbiter Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and closing their payload bay doors. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1692

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1703

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility cover up areas of Atlantis with plastic, preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1710

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility cover up areas of Atlantis, preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1708

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility cover up areas of Atlantis with plastic, preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1709

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility unwrap plastic for use in covering equipment as part of preparations for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closing the payload bay doors and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1707

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, workers prepare to close the payload bay doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1697

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1702

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers cover with plastic the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other modules and equipment are being covered as well. Workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1713

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, workers prepare to close the payload bay doors on Atlantis in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1698

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1700

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Orbiter Processing Facility finish Hurricane preparations on the payload bay doors of Atlantis. Preparing for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday, workers also powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1711

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Atlantis’ payload bay doors are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1699

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a worker checks out part of Atlantis after payload bay doors were closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1701

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, modules wrapped in plastic line one wall. The modules and equipment are being covered in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. KSC workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1715

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers cover with plastic the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Donatello in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other modules and equipment are being covered as well. Workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1714

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker wraps equipment in plastic in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. The various modules in the SSPF, such as the Japanese Experiment Module, U.S. Node 2 and Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules, are being covered as well. KSC workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1717

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, the payload bay doors on Atlantis are being closed in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other preparations at KSC include powering down the Space Shuttle orbiters and stowing the landing gear. Workers are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1704

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers cover with plastic the U.S. Node 2 in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. Other modules and equipment are being covered as well. Workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1712

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, modules and equipment are being covered in plastic in preparation for the expected impact of Hurricane Frances on Saturday. KSC workers also have powered down the Space Shuttle orbiters, closed their payload bay doors and stowed the landing gear. They are also taking precautions against flooding by moving spacecraft hardware off the ground and sandbagging facilities. The SSPF can withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and wind gusts up to 132 mph. The Orbiter Processing Facility is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 105 mph. The Vehicle Assembly Building is constructed of concrete and steel and was designed to withstand winds of 125 mph. Other payload and flight hardware support facilities can endure winds of 110 mph. Launch pads and the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility can withstand 125-mph winds. KSC-04pd1716

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The category 3 Hurricane Jeanne barreled through Central Florida Sept. 25-26 from the southeast. This once-pristine beach east of the launch pads on KSC is now littered with debris from the dunes, at left, after assault by the storm surge and raging winds. Jeanne was the fourth hurricane in 6 weeks to batter the state. KSC-04pd1908

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Demolished dunes along the shoreline of KSC east of the launch pads are part of the aftermath of Hurricane Jeanne. The category 3 storm barreled through Central Florida Sept. 25-26, the fourth hurricane in 6 weeks to batter the state. KSC-04pd1931

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The storm surge and high winds of Hurricane Jeanne have replaced the rolling sand dunes on the KSC shoreline east of the launch pads with cliffs of sand, shown here. A category 3 storm, Jeanne barreled through Central Florida Sept. 25-26, the fourth hurricane in 6 weeks to batter the state. KSC-04pd1945

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This view of the shoreline east of the launch pads at KSC shows the ocean lapping at the base of what appears to be a cliff. The storm surge and raging winds from Hurricane Jeanne eroded the dunes and shoreline. The category 3 storm barreled through Central Florida Sept. 25-26 from the southeast. It was the fourth hurricane in 6 weeks to batter the state. KSC-04pd1907

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of some of the new crawler shoes that arrived from Minnesota. The new shoes were manufactured by ME Global in Duluth. The CT transports the Mobile Launcher Platform, with the assembled Space Shuttle aboard, between the refurbishment area, the VAB and Launch Complex Pads 39A and 39B. The crawlers have 456 shoes, 57 per belt (8 belts in all). Each shoe weighs 2,200 pounds. The original shoes were manufactured for the Apollo Program. Cracks appeared in the shoes in recent years spurring a need for replacement. The new manufacturer, in Duluth, Minn., has improved the design for Return to Flight and use through the balance of the Space Shuttle Program. KSC-04pd2138

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A tractor-trailer arrives at the Crawler Transporter (CT) area with a new shipment of crawler shoes. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The new shoes were manufactured by ME Global in Duluth, Minn. The CT transports the Mobile Launcher Platform, with the assembled Space Shuttle aboard, between the refurbishment area, the VAB and Launch Complex Pads 39A and 39B. The crawlers have 456 shoes, 57 per belt (8 belts in all). Each shoe weighs 2,200 pounds. The original shoes were manufactured for the Apollo Program. Cracks appeared in the shoes in recent years spurring a need for replacement. The new manufacturer, in Duluth, Minn., has improved the design for Return to Flight and use through the balance of the Space Shuttle Program. KSC-04pd2135

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Crawler Transporter (CT) area, a worker offloads some of the new crawler shoes that arrived. In the background is one of the two CTs. The new shoes were manufactured by ME Global in Duluth, Minn. The CT transports the Mobile Launcher Platform, with the assembled Space Shuttle aboard, between the refurbishment area, the VAB and Launch Complex Pads 39A and 39B. The crawlers have 456 shoes, 57 per belt (8 belts in all). Each shoe weighs 2,200 pounds. The original shoes were manufactured for the Apollo Program. Cracks appeared in the shoes in recent years spurring a need for replacement. The new manufacturer, in Duluth, Minn., has improved the design for Return to Flight and use through the balance of the Space Shuttle Program. KSC-04pd2136

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A tractor-trailer arrives at the Crawler Transporter (CT) area with a new shipment of crawler shoes. The new shoes were manufactured by ME Global in Duluth, Minn. The CT transports the Mobile Launcher Platform, with the assembled Space Shuttle aboard, between the refurbishment area, the VAB and Launch Complex Pads 39A and 39B. The crawlers have 456 shoes, 57 per belt (8 belts in all). Each shoe weighs 2,200 pounds. The original shoes were manufactured for the Apollo Program. Cracks appeared in the shoes in recent years spurring a need for replacement. The new manufacturer, in Duluth, Minn., has improved the design for Return to Flight and use through the balance of the Space Shuttle Program. KSC-04pd2134

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Crawler Transporter (CT) area, a worker places another load of new crawler shoes on the ground. The new shoes were manufactured by ME Global in Duluth, Minn. The CT transports the Mobile Launcher Platform, with the assembled Space Shuttle aboard, between the refurbishment area, the VAB and Launch Complex Pads 39A and 39B. The crawlers have 456 shoes, 57 per belt (8 belts in all). Each shoe weighs 2,200 pounds. The original shoes were manufactured for the Apollo Program. Cracks appeared in the shoes in recent years spurring a need for replacement. The new manufacturer, in Duluth, Minn., has improved the design for Return to Flight and use through the balance of the Space Shuttle Program. KSC-04pd2137

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Railroad tracks run along the shoreline east of Launch Pads 39A and 39B, seen in the background. North of Launch Pad 39B, the tracks turn west, passing the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility and heading through the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge until joining the East Coast Railway north of Titusville, Fla. KSC-06pd0065

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from the east side, Launch Pads 39A and 39B tower over the bird-filled waters of the Banana River at NASA Kennedy Space Center. On the far right is seen the 300-gallon water tower. Rising above the fixed service structures are the 80-foot lightning masts that help protect the structures from lightning strikes. KSC-06pd0064

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This aerial view looking north shows space shuttle Complex 39 Launch Pads A (foreground) and B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. To the right is the Atlantic Ocean. Photo credit: Cory Huston KSC-06pd0390

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - One of the two space shuttle launch pads in Launch Complex 39 is visible behind the Pegasus barge as it traverses the turn basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The barge is on the last leg of its journey from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans to NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The barge carries the redesigned external fuel tank that will launch Space Shuttle Discovery on the next shuttle mission, STS-121. After off-loading, the tank will be moved into the Vehicle Assembly Building and lifted into a checkout cell for further work. The tank, designated ET-119, will fly with many major safety changes, including the removal of the protuberance air load ramps. A large piece of foam from a ramp came off during the last shuttle launch in July 2005. The ramps were removed to eliminate a potential source of damaging debris to the space shuttle. The next launch of Discovery is scheduled for May 2006. KSC-06pd0406

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Leaders from space agencies around the world take a moment from the International Space Station Heads of Agency meeting being held at Kennedy Space Center for a group portrait, framed by the space shuttle launch pads in Launch Complex 39. From left are Canadian Space Agency Vice-President Space Science, Technology and Programs Virendra Jha; Russian Federal Space Agency Head Anatolii Perminov; European Space Agency Director-General Jean-Jacques Dordain; NASA Administrator Michael Griffin; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency President Keiji Tachikawa. The purpose of the meeting is to review International Space Station cooperation and endorse a revision to the station configuration and assembly sequence. KSC-06pd0414

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Scott Kerr, director of Engineering Development at Kennedy Space Center, addresses guests at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Operations Support Building II (behind him). He and other key Center personnel and guests attended the significant event. The Operations Support Building II is an Agency safety and health initiative project to replace 198,466 square feet of substandard modular housing and trailers in the Launch Complex 39 area at Kennedy Space Center. The five-story building, which sits south of the Vehicle Assembly Building and faces the launch pads, includes 960 office spaces, 16 training rooms, computer and multimedia conference rooms, a Mission Conference Center with an observation deck, technical libraries, an Exchange store, storage, break areas, and parking. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd0546

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With the ribbon-cutting ceremony, the new Operations Support Building II is officially in business. Participating in the event are (left to right) Aris Garcia, vice president of the architecture firm Wolfgang Alvarez; Mark Nappi, associate program manager of Ground Operations for United Space Alliance; Donald Minderman, NASA project manager; Scott Kerr, director of Engineering Development at Kennedy; Bill Parsons, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center; Miguel Morales, with NASA Engineering Development; Mike Wetmore, director of Shuttle Processing; and Tim Clancy, president of the construction firm Clancy & Theys. The Operations Support Building II is an Agency safety and health initiative project to replace 198,466 square feet of substandard modular housing and trailers in the Launch Complex 39 area at Kennedy Space Center. The five-story building, which sits south of the Vehicle Assembly Building and faces the launch pads, includes 960 office spaces, 16 training rooms, computer and multimedia conference rooms, a Mission Conference Center with an observation deck, technical libraries, an Exchange store, storage, break areas, and parking. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd0547

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director Bill Parsons explains the significance of the Operations Support Building II (behind him) to guests at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. The Operations Support Building II is an Agency safety and health initiative project to replace 198,466 square feet of substandard modular housing and trailers in the Launch Complex 39 area at Kennedy Space Center. The five-story building, which sits south of the Vehicle Assembly Building and faces the launch pads, includes 960 office spaces, 16 training rooms, computer and multimedia conference rooms, a Mission Conference Center with an observation deck, technical libraries, an Exchange store, storage, break areas, and parking. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd0545

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director Bill Parsons talks to guests at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Operations Support Building II (behind him). He and other key Center personnel and guests attended the significant event. The Operations Support Building II is an Agency safety and health initiative project to replace 198,466 square feet of substandard modular housing and trailers in the Launch Complex 39 area at Kennedy Space Center. The five-story building, which sits south of the Vehicle Assembly Building and faces the launch pads, includes 960 office spaces, 16 training rooms, computer and multimedia conference rooms, a Mission Conference Center with an observation deck, technical libraries, an Exchange store, storage, break areas, and parking. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd0544

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A flock of white pelicans splash down in the turn basin near one of the launch pads at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. White pelicans winter from Florida and southern California to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons, and usually in colonies. The turn basin was carved out of the Banana River when Kennedy Space Center was built. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. In addition, the refuge supports 19 endangered or threatened wildlife species on Federal or State lists, more than any other single refuge in the U.S. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd0369

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pegasus barge is towed on the barge channel leading to the Launch Complex 39 Area. The barge's cargo is the external tank prepared for mission STS-118 by the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans. Visible at right is one of the launch pads and the nearby water tower. The destination of the barge is the turn basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank will be offloaded and moved to the VAB. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-07pd0840

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The mobile service towers on Launch Pads 17-A (left) and 17-B (right) are silhouetted against the pre-dawn sky at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. In the background are the launch gantries. Pad 17-B is the site for the launch of the Dawn spacecraft on June 30. Dawn's mission is to explore two of the asteroid belt's most intriguing and dissimilar occupants: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-07pd1307

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Breaking ground in a mock ceremony for a new weather radar site are (left to right) Project Lead Kim Gwaltney, with SLRSC; 45th Space Wing Operations Group Commander Col. Bernard Gruber; Range Systems Support Manager Walt Danewood; Lt. Col. Stacy Exum with the 45th Space Wing; Lt. Col. Jennifer Alexander with the 45th Space Wing; Harry Earl with Heard Construction and Pat Carr, SLRSC program director with ITT. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-08pd2302

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new weather radar site is dedicated with a mock ground-breaking ceremony. At the podium is Pat Carr, SLRSC program director with ITT. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-08pd2301

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The construction site is leveled for a new weather radar to be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. In the background is the location where a mock ground-breaking ceremony was held. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-08pd2303

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2976

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new Doppler weather radar tower is being built in an area near S.R. 520 in Orange County, Florida. The new tower will replace one at nearby Patrick Air Force Base. The site will be used by NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing and their customers. The tower will be able to monitor weather conditions directly above the launch pads Kennedy. The weather radar is essential in issuing lightning and other severe weather warnings and vital in evaluating lightning launch commit criteria. The new radar, replacing what was installed 25 years ago, includes Doppler capability to detect winds and identify the type, size and number of precipitation particles. The site is ideally distant from the launch pads and has unobstructed views of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2977