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Outpost

A Night Scout in the Southwest – Surprise of an Outpost, and Survey of the Rebel Guns (from Harper's Weekly)

Cavalry outpost, near Potomac Creek. Daybreak on a cold morning

Guard mount, San Roque outpost

Officers in command of San Roque outpost

East Beach outpost, San Roque

Outpost guards, Cavite, P.I.

San Roque outpost

The outpost

Albanian outpost

Montenegro - an outpost of the Malissori

Tripoli - Italian outpost on the desert

Tripoli - artillery outpost in desert

Italian Outpost in Tripoli

Insurrectos outpost

Insurrectos outpost. In distance El Paso and Juarez Mexican War.

British outpost on bank of canal near St. Floris. Ypres Salient and Area. 5-9-1918

British outpost during the Salonika Campaign

Australians on outpost duty in the Ypres Salient. Belgium. May 1916

British outpost on edge of the desert during the Mesopotamian campaign

British outpost near St. Floris. 5-9-1918

Italian soldiers' amusements at mountain outpost

Turkish regulars at an outpost in Syria

American Red Cross - In the Zone of Advance - Activities - American Red Cross Dugout near front. These soldiers have just come out of a Red Cross dugout near the new front lines in the St. Mihiel salient. They have their hands full of doughnuts, cigarettes and magazines. This outpost outfit followed a few miles behind the fightersin the advance. When the American infantryman dug in, the Red Cross men dug in also under a ruined house, started their fires, and within a few hours were serving thousands of weary but enthusiastic Americans with hot drinks and other comforts

American Red Cross - E thru H - Red Cross Canteen near front in France. Captain Godchaux of the American Red Cross outpost service and Canteel Personnel, 3 miles from the front. American Red Cross workers here, face continual bombardment. They serve the soldiers with tobacco, chocolates, etc

American Red Cross - In the Zone of Advance - Activities - U.S. Canteens in France. Doughboys in front of the American Red Cross canteen in the St. Mihiel salient. They are waiting for their turn in distribution of doughnuts, cigarettes and magazines. This outpost outfit followed a few miles behind the doughboys in their new advance. When the American infantrymen dug in, the American Red Cross dug in also under a ruined house, started their fires, and within a few hours were serving thousands of weary but enthusiastic Americans with hot drinks and other comforts

American Red Cross - In the Zone of Advance - Activities - Red Cross outpost in St. Mihiel Salient. A Red Cross outpost at a lonely crossroads back of the new lines in the St. Mihiel salient. The Red Cross serves hot drinks, eating, chocolates, tobacco, cigarettes and sometimes doughnuts to the boys in the lower front room at the left. To the extreme right can been a dugout where the guests as well as the Red Cross workers are forced to take refuge at frequent intervals because of shelling

American Red Cross - Refugees - American Red Cross in North Russia. American soldiers and some children who they found starving near Archangel. When news was brought to camp, all soldiers chipped in to give out of their own supplies of hard tack, bully beef and bread, but that was not enough. One of the soldiers volunteered to nurse the dying mother and her little girl. Another soldier was sent at once to American Red Cross headquarters, a trip of an hour and a half from this small outpost camp, for expert help and a trained nurse. The nurse left at once with the soldier traveling throug a blinding snow storm to the little peasant cottage

American Red Cross - In the Zone of Advance - Activities - Red Cross outpost in St. Mihiel Salient. An American Red Cross canteen established in the ruins of a village evacuated by the Boches in their retreat from the St. Mihiel salient. The Red Cross outpost here was set up in the only house with a partial roof left in town. The women in the picture are Miss Scott and Mrs. Farwell of Chicago. They carry all of their equipment in one motor turck and follow the advance, pitching their outpose at whatever point in the battle zone they can best serve. The man in apron at left is an army cook, who during his off hours came in to help cook doughnuts. This Red Cross outpose served an average of 10,000 men a day with hot coffee, chocolate, doughnuts, biscuits and jam, and sandwiches

Landi Khana Camp. Furthest outpost on frontier of Afghanistan. New boundary runs across road at 'x'

Potash lorries burned on Jericho road. Armed Jewish workers on their semi-circular sand-bag outpost near the Palestine Potash Works, part of which is seen in the distant [i.e., distance] to the left

Chrysler tank arsenal. Individual mobile arsenals are the outpost of the huge Chrysler tank arsenal on the outskirts of Detroit. A worker is here installing a machine gun on an M-3 tank, one of the twenty-eight ton giants which mount four machine guns, two .50 calibre and two .30 calibre, a .75 mm. gun and a 37 mm. anti-aircraft gun, as well as an assortment of hand machine guns, and other weapons for use by the crew

Outpost of democracy's arsenal. Gate of an eastern Navy yard, a well-guarded portal behind which units of Uncle Sam's two-ocean Navy are being rushed to completion

A train of bombs drops from United States Army Air forces plane on territory in the Aleutians held by the Japanese. Our fighting forces harass the enemy at this important outpost daily

A train of bombs drops from United States Army Air Forces plane on territory in the Aleutians held by the Japanese. Our fighting forces harass the enemy at this important outpost daily

Two Marines man an outpost for Kilo Btry., 1ST B., 12th Marines. One of the Marines is talking on a field radio. The battalion is going through combat readiness evaluation at the Pakalula Training Area

SRA Joseph Conner, 147th Security Police Fleet, Army SSGT James Stanford and Army CPL Kevin Lambright, 24th Infantry Division, watch for enemy aircraft at a security outpost during exercise Bold Eagle '82. The men are armed with M-16 rifles

SRA Joseph Conner, 147th Security Police Fleet, Army SSGT James Stanford and Army CPL Kevin Lambright, 24th Infantry Division, watch for enemy aircraft at a security outpost during exercise Bold Eagle '82. The men are armed with M-16 rifles

Steyr vehicles and light armored equipment are parked at an outpost during Operation Desert Shield

Artwork: "High Mountain Outpost" Artist: Karl Sommer

M-47 heavy tanks of the 2nd South Korean Army Tank Battalion move toward the combat outpost line in support of the 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, during the joint South Korea/U.S. training exercise Team Spirit '82

LCOL Michael J. Sierra, commander, 1ST Bn., 35th Inf., 25th Infantry Div., second from the left, looks over the Combat Outpost Line in the Cheop Yeong Valley with members of the South Korean Army 2nd Tank Battalion during the joint South Korea/U.S. training exercise Team Spirit '82

An overview of the city at night as seen from a U.S. Marine outpost at the American University of Beirut Library, formerly a stronghold of Druze militia. The Marines have been deployed in Lebanon as part of the multi-national peacekeeping force following confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization

A starboard bow view of the Aegis guided missile cruiser USS VINCENNES (CG 49) after being launched from the Ingalls drydock. The ship, named to commemorate the capture of a British outpost at Vincennes, Indiana during the Revolutionary War, is scheduled to be commissioned on April 14, 1985

An air to air left rear view of a 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft en route to the North Pole. The aircraft if loaded with drums of fuel oil and building supplies to be airdropped at a scientific outpost

A 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft is loaded with drums of fuel oil to be airdropped at a scientific outpost near the North Pole

A 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft is loaded with drums of fuel oil to be airdropped at a scientific outpost near the North Pole

An interior view of drums of fuel oil being airdropped from a 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter to a scientific outpost near the North Pole

An air to air left side view of a 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft airdropping fuel oil and building supplies to a scientific outpost near the North Pole

A 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft is loaded with drums of fuel oil to be airdropped at a scientific outpost near the North Pole

Airmen load drums of fuel oil aboard a 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft. The supplies will be airdropped over a scientific outpost near the North Pole

A 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft is loaded with drums of fuel oil to be airdropped at a scientific outpost near the North Pole

A 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft is loaded with drums of fuel oil to be airdropped at a scientific outpost near the North Pole

A pallet of equipment is offloaded from a 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft. The aircraft is stopping at Thule while en route to airdrop fuel oil and building supplies to a scientific outpost near the North Pole

An air to air right side view of a 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft en route to the North Pole. The aircraft if loaded with fuel oil and building supplies to be airdropped at a scientific outpost

A 437th Military Airlift Wing C-141B Starlifter aircraft is loaded with drums of fuel oil to be airdropped at a scientific outpost near the North Pole

Brigadier General (BGEN) Frank K. Martin, CHIEF of Security Police, United States (US) Air Force, takes aim with a Stinger anti-aircraft guided missile while visiting an 8th Security Police Squadron outpost during the air base ground defense Exercise FOAL EAGLE '89. Air Force security police personnel from various United States and Pacific commands are taking part in the exercise

Two Marines from Surveillance and Target Acquisition (STA) Plt., Headquarters and Service (H&S) Co., 1ST Bn., 3rd Marines, man an outpost near their battalion's position during Operation Desert Shield. The Marine at left is armed with an M-40A1 sniping rifle.

M998 High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV) are parked at an outpost during Operation Desert Shield

M998 High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV) and other equipment are parked at an outpost during Operation Desert Shield

An abandoned Iraqi M-160, 160mm mortar stands at an outpost after Iraqi forces withdrew from Kuwait City during Operation Desert Storm.

An abandoned Iraqi S-60 57mm automatic anti-aircraft gun stands at an outpost following the withdrawal of Iraqi troops during Operation Desert Storm.

A Kuwaiti M-84 main battle tank lays a smoke screen during a capabilities demonstration at a Kuwaiti outpost during Operation Desert Shield.

Soldiers in a Niger army unit stand in formation while a dignitary visits their outpost during Operation Desert Shield. The men are armed with M-14 rifles.

Kuwaiti soldiers stand in formation as a dignitary visits their outpost during Operation Desert Shield.

LT. GEN. Khalid Bin Sultan Bin Abdul Aziz, commander of Joint Forces in Saudi Arabia, visits the Niger army's outpost during Operation Desert Shield.

A Kuwaiti M-84 main battle tank crosses a trench during a capabilities demonstration at a Kuwaiti outpost during Operation Desert Shield.

A Kuwaiti M-113 armored personnel carrier crosses a trench during a capabilities demonstration at a Kuwaiti outpost during Operation Desert Shield.

A Kuwaiti M-84 main battle tank crosses a trench during a capabilities demonstration at a Kuwaiti outpost during Operation Desert Shield.

SENIOR AIRMAN Theresa Sronce from the 182nd Fighter Group, Peoria, Illinois, gives water to a dog that wandered into their outpost in Goram, Ilinois along a levee near Mississippi River

SENIOR AIRMAN Theresa Sronce from the 182nd Fighter Group, Peoria, Illinois chats with a flood victim at the outpost in Goram, Illinois along a levee near the Mississippi River

Corporal Domingo Quintano reads his Professional Soldier manual in his quarters at Outpost U-55N. Soldiers from the 1ST Armored Division, Baumholder, Germany maintain a presence under United Nations Provide Forces (UNPROFOR) along the Macedonian Serbian borders. The unit maintains 10 outposts along the border

United Nations High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) wait at Outpost U-51B in the hills of Northern Macedonia. Soldiers from the 1ST Armored Division, Baumholder, Germany maintain a presence under United Nations Provide Forces (UNPROFOR) along the Macedonian Serbian borders. The unit maintains 10 outposts along the border

Indian River Lagoon National Scenic Byway - Sendler Education Outpost

The Honorable Walter B. Slocombe (gray shirt), Under Secretary of Defense (Policy), his security personnel, and several unidentified soldiers walkdown a dirt driveway that leads to a C Co., 1ST United Kingdom Mechanized Brigade platoon outpost in Cukuvi, Bosnia-Herzegovina. The building in the background, with the armored vehicle parked in front, serves as the barracks. Mr. Slocombe is on a two-day visit to Bosnia-Herzegovina to meet with IFOR personnel and various Bosnian civic leaders

STS-86 Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, at right; David A. Wolf; and Wendy B. Lawrence, at far left, take their seats inside the Space Shuttle Atlantis during a practice launch countdown called the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Seven crew members will fly to the Russian Space Station Mir for the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1374

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Final preparations are under way to close the payload bay doors of the Space Shuttle Atlantis for the planned Sept. 25 liftoff of Mission STS-86. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB Double Module, shown at top center. SPACEHAB will be used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for the three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between Atlantis and the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The 10-day flight also is scheduled to include the transfer of the sixth American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Atlantis and its seven-member crew is targeted for 10:34 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers prepare to close the payload bay doors of the Space Shuttle Atlantis in preparation for the planned Sept. 25 liftoff of Mission STS-86. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB Double Module, at center, which will be used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for the three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between Atlantis and the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The 10-day flight also is scheduled to include the transfer of the sixth American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Atlantis and its seven-member crew is targeted for 10:34 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers prepare to close the payload bay doors of the Space Shuttle Atlantis in preparation for the planned Sept. 25 liftoff of Mission STS-86. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB Double Module, at center, which will be used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for the three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between Atlantis and the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The 10-day flight also is scheduled to include the transfer of the sixth American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Atlantis and its seven-member crew is targeted for 10:34 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1396

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Final preparations are under way to close the payload bay doors of the Space Shuttle Atlantis for the planned Sept. 25 liftoff of Mission STS-86. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB Double Module, part of which can be seen at top center. SPACEHAB will be used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for the three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between Atlantis and the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The 10-day flight also is scheduled to include the transfer of the sixth American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Atlantis and its seven-member crew is targeted for 10:34 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1399

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (leaning into Parazynski); Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Parazynski and Lawrence had trained to live and work aboard the Russian station but were withdrawn from Mir training Parazynski because he was "too tall" to fit safely in the Russian Soyuz vehicle, and Lawrence because she is "too short" to fit in the Russian spacewalk suit. "Just right" Wolf is scheduled to become a Mir 24 crew member after the docking, to replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale for an extended stay aboard the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1413

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew members gather for a snack and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Commander James D. Wetherbee; Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. After a weather briefing, the astronauts will don their orange launch and entry suits and depart for Launch Pad 39A where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff at about 10:34 p.m. EDT, Sept. 25. The exact launch time may vary slightly based on calculations of the Russian Space Station Mir’s precise location in space at the time of liftoff. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Shuttle with the Mir. Wolf is scheduled to become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis after more than four months on the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1419

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 crew members and technicians participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in front of the back cap of the SPACEHAB module at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working onorbit. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1722

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., participates in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in front of the Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device (RRMD) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nineday flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its sevenmember crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1723

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 crew members participate with trainers in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. From left to right are Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; Commander Terry Wilcutt; Boeing SPACEHAB Operations Engineer Jim Behling; Boeing SPACEHAB Crew Trainer Laura Keiser; an unidentified staff member (with mustache); Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency; and Pilot Joe Edwards. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nineday flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its sevenmember crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1724

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Several STS-89 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the SPACEHAB module at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. From left to right are Mission Specialists Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., and Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency, and Pilot Joe Edwards. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1721

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A technician from the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) tests the real-time radiation monitoring device on SPACEHAB at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for the STS-89 mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1594

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians from the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) test the real-time radiation monitoring device on SPACEHAB at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for the STS-89 mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1595

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A technician from the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) tests the real-time radiation monitoring device on SPACEHAB at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for the STS-89 mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1593

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians from the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) test the real-time radiation monitoring device on SPACEHAB at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for the STS-89 mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1592

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Sitting in front of SPACEHAB is STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt listening to instruction by Chris Jaskolka, Boeing SPACEHAB Program senior engineer, as Lynn Ashby, Boeing SPACEHAB Program principal engineer, looks on KSC-98pc422

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency KSC-98pc429

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are Boeing SPACEHAB Payload Operations Senior Engineer Jim Behling, STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Principal Engineer Lynn Ashby, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency KSC-98pc425

The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, Boeing SPACEHAB Payload Operations Senior Engineer Jim Behling, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Specialist in Engineering Ed Saenger, STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Manager in Engineering Brad Reid, and Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova KSC-98pc421

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. At far left is Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Ellen Styles, and around the table are, left to right, STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Chris Jazkolka, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency KSC-98pc426

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Seen here are STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency and his Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova KSC-98pc424

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., Commander Charles Precourt, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, and Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency KSC-98pc427

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., STS091 Pilot Dominic Gorie, and STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, and Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks KSC-98pc428

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency KSC-98pc423

The SPACEHAB Single Module is raised by crane from a transporter in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility, where it will be moved to the payload canister. It will be joined in the canister by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-01 payload before being moved to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-91 mission, scheduled to launch June 2 at around 6:04 p.m. EDT. SPACEHAB is used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to return the sixth American, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., aboard the Russian orbiting outpost safely to Earth KSC-98pc542