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Officials from National Marine Fisheries Service

Global Vegetation map

NOAA NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT IN LEWIS LEAR JET AIRPLANE

NOAA NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT IN LEWIS LEAR JET AIRPLANE

NOAA NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT IN LEWIS LEAR JET AIRPLANE

NOAA NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT IN LEWIS LEAR JET AIRPLANE

NOAA NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT IN LEWIS LEAR JET AIRPLANE

NOAA NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT IN LEWIS LEAR JET AIRPLANE

A port view of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship MOUNT MITCHELL (S 222) at the Norfolk Shipyard. During times of war or national crisis, NOAA ships can be expected to operate with the Navy

A starboard bow view of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research ship RESEARCHER (R 103) moored at pier No. 1. In the background is the destroyer USS BARRY (DD 933), a Navy Yard memorial ship. NOAA ships provide maps and charts used by the armed services and can be expected to operate with the Navy in time of war or national crisis

A port bow view of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research ship Oceanographer (R 101) moored at a commercial pier

A port view of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research ship Researcher (R 103) during the International Naval Review

A port view of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research ship Researcher (R 103) during the International Naval Review

A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) work crew replaces the used smoke grenades in the frames mounted on a 210-foot tower. The smoke grenades are being used by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory who are investigating the wind vortices created by the passage of an aircraft and the effects that those disturbances would have on low-altitude parachute drops

A starboard quarter view of a 65-foot patrol boat in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) boat yard on the Elizabeth River. The boat is assigned to the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, Virginia

A starboard side view of a 65-foot patrol boat in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) boat yard on the Elizabeth River. The boat is assigned to the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, Virginia

A port side view of a 65-foot patrol boat in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) boat yard on the Elizabeth River. The boat is assigned to the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, Virginia

The Soviet oceanographic research ship Nikolav Matusevich, left, is docked alongside the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research vessel, the Malcolm Baldrige (R-103). Both ships are open to the public for tours

A port quarter view of the Soviet oceanographic research ship Nikolav Matusevich docked alongside the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research vessel, the Malcolm Baldrige (R-103). Both ships are open to the public for tours

A port quarter view of the Soviet oceanographic research ship Nikolav Matusevich docked alongside the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research vessel, the Malcolm Baldrige (R-103). Both ships are open to the public for tours

A port bow view of the Soviet oceanographic research ship Nikolav Matusevich docked in port. The Soviet vessel, along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research ship Malcolm Baldrige (R-103), is open to the public for tours

A port bow view of the Soviet oceanographic research ship Nikolav Matusevich docked alongside the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research vessel, the Malcolm Baldrige (R-103). Both ships are open to the public for tours

A port bow view of the Soviet oceanographic research ship Nikolav Matusevich docked alongside the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research vessel, the Malcolm Baldrige (R-103). Both ships are open to the public for tours

The Americas and Hurricane Andrew

The ocean surveillance ship USNS ADVENTUROUS (T-AGOS-13) stands tied to the Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) pier

A starboard bow view of the ocean surveillance ship USNS RELENTLESS (T-AGOS-18) tied up at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) pier

A port bow view of the ocean surveillance ship USNS WORTHY (T-AGOS-14) tied up at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) pier

A starboard quarter view of the ocean surveillance ship USNS ADVENTUROUS (T-AGOS-13) tied up at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) pier

An overview of the Naval Research and Development Center, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research ship DAVID STARR JORDEN (R-444) moored to the right of the installation

A low wide angle view at twilight of hangar five; the new location for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Big Blue Marble

The Atlas 1 (AC-73) carrying the GOES-1, the first of five next-generation advanced weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sits poised on Complex 36-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station ready for launch. 94PC-583

A port bow view of the NOAA oceanographic research ship ADVENTUROUS (T-AGOS-14) tied up at the National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) pier on the Elizabeth River

Satellite Image of Earth's Interrelated Systems and Climate

STS062-16-033 - STS-062 - Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) in Columbia's payload bay

Space Systems/LORAL employees inspect solar panels for the GOES-K weather satellite in the Astrotech facility at Titusville, Fla., as they begin final testing of the imaging system, communications and power systems of the spacecraft. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The launch of the satellite from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) is currently planned for Apr. 24 at the opening of a launch window which extends from 1:56 to 3:19 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc224

Space Systems/LORAL employees inspect solar panels for the GOES-K weather satellite in the Astrotech facility at Titusville, Fla., as they begin final testing of the imaging system, communications and power systems of the spacecraft. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The launch of the satellite from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) is currently planned for Apr. 24 at the opening of a launch window which extends from 1:56 to 3:19 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc222

Space Systems/LORAL employees inspect solar panels for the GOES-K weather satellite in the Astrotech facility at Titusville, Fla., as they begin final testing of the imaging system, communications and power systems of the spacecraft. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The launch of the satellite from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) is currently planned for Apr. 24 at the opening of a launch window which extends from 1:56 to 3:19 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc223

The Atlas 1 rocket which will launch the GOES-K advanced weather satellite is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 air cargo plane after arrival at the Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The Lockheed Martin-built rocket and its Centaur upper stage will form the AC-79 vehicle, the final vehicle in the Atlas 1 series which began launches for NASA in 1962. Future launches of geostationary operational environmental satellites (GOES) in the current series will be on Atlas II vehicles. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites built for NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The spacecraft will be designated GOES-10 in orbit. The launch of AC-79/GOES-K is targeted for April 24 from Launch Pad 36B, CCAS KSC-97pc356

The Atlas 1 rocket which will carry the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-K (GOES-K) into space is erected at Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The Lockheed Martin-built rocket and its Centaur upper stage will form the AC-79 vehicle, the final vehicle in the Atlas 1 series which began launches for NASA in 1962. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of geostationary weather satellites built for NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The spacecraft will be designated GOES-10 in orbit. Launch is targeted for April 24 KSC-97pc475

A Lockheed Martin Atlas I (AC-79) successfully launched the Geostationary-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite-K (GOES-K) weather satellite, built by Space Systems/Loral of Palo Alto, California, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Once in orbit, GOES-K will be renamed GOES-10. The launch took place at 1:49 A.M. EDT

The Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) which will carry the GOES-K advanced weather satellite undergoes a critical prelaunch test with its mobile service tower pulled back. The Wet Dress Rehearsal is a major prelaunch test designed to demonstrate, in part, the launch readiness of the vehicle and launch support equipment. AC-79 will be the final launch of an Atlas 1 rocket, a derivative of the original Atlas Centaur which had its first successful launch for NASA in 1963. Future launches of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in the current series will be on Atlas II vehicles. The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. The launch of AC-79 with the GOES-K is targeted for <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24</a> during a launch window which extends from 1:50-3:09 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc632

The Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) which will carry the GOES-K advanced weather satellite undergoes a critical prelaunch test with its mobile service tower pulled back. The Wet Dress Rehearsal is a major prelaunch test designed to demonstrate, in part, the launch readiness of the vehicle and launch support equipment. AC-79 will be the final launch of an Atlas 1 rocket, a derivative of the original Atlas Centaur which had its first successful launch for NASA in 1963. Future launches of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in the current series will be on Atlas II vehicles. The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. The launch of AC-79 with the GOES-K is targeted for <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24</a> during a launch window which extends from 1:50-3:09 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc633

With its prelaunch processing completed, the GOES-K advanced weather satellite awaits encapsulation in the Atlas 1 payload fairing, seen at left rear. GOES-K was prepared for launch at the Astrotech Space Operations LP facility in Titusville. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) from Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The launch window opens at 1:50 a.m. and extends to 3:09 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, GOES-K will become GOES-10, joining GOES-8 and GOES-9 in space KSC-97pc635

Workers at the Astrotech Space Operations LP facility in Titusville make final checks and adjustments after encapsulating the GOES-K advanced weather satellite in the Atlas 1 payload fairing. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) from Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The launch window opens at 1:50 a.m. and extends to 3:09 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, GOES-K will become GOES-10, joining GOES-8 and GOES-9 in space KSC-97pc636

The Atlas 1 payload fairing with the encapsulated GOES-K advanced weather satellite awaits transport to the launch pad. GOES-K was prepared for launch at the Astrotech Space Operations LP facility in Titusville. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) from Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The launch window opens at 1:50 a.m. and extends to 3:09 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, GOES-K will become GOES-10, joining GOES-8 and GOES-9 in space KSC-97pc638

Workers at the Astrotech Space Operations LP facility in Titusville make final checks and adjustments after encapsulating the GOES-K advanced weather satellite in the Atlas 1 payload fairing. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) from Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The launch window opens at 1:50 a.m. and extends to 3:09 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, GOES-K will become GOES-10, joining GOES-8 and GOES-9 in space KSC-97pc637

The GOES-K advanced weather satellite, already encapsulated in the Atlas 1 payload fairing, is carefully placed on the transporter at Astrotech Space Operations LP facility in Titusville. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) from Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The launch window opens at 1:50 a.m. and extends to 3:09 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, GOES-K will become GOES-10, joining GOES-8 and GOES-9 in space KSC-97pc634

Workers prepare for the mating of the Atlas 1 payload fairing containing the GOES-K advanced weather satellite with the Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) at Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> during a launch window which extends from 1:50-3:09 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc649

The Atlas 1 payload fairing with the encapsulated GOES-K advanced weather satellite, at top center, is mated to the Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) at Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> during a launch window which extends from 1:50-3:09 a.m. EDT KSC-97pc651

The Atlas 1 payload fairing with the encapsulated GOES-K advanced weather satellite is being lifted into position for mating to the Lockheed Martin Atlas 1 expendable launch vehicle (AC-79) at Launch Complex 36, Pad B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. GOES-K will be the third spacecraft to be launched in the advanced series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The GOES satellites are owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); NASA manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft. GOES-K is targeted for an <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/63-97.htm">April 24 launch</a> during a launch window which extends from 1:50-3:09 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, GOES-K will become GOES-10, joining GOES-8 and GOES-9 in space KSC-97pc650

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc715

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc712

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc716

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc714

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc713

Port bow view of the National Oceanographic And Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Research Ship RICHARD L. BROWN (R-104) former AGR-26, completing fitting out at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration headquarters at Norfolk, Virginia (VA) prior to entering sevice as a replacement for the MALCOM BALDRIDGE (R-103)

NASA pilots Dick Ewens and Gordon Fullerton sit at the controls in the cockpit of the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 that was on view at Patrick Air Force Base. The DC-8 is one of two aircraft being flown in a hurricane study through September to learn about the storms from top to bottom. Flying at 35,000 to 40,000 feet, the DC-8 is equipped with instruments to measure a hurricane’s structure, environment and changes in intensity and tracking. The other plane, a modified U2, and the DC-8 will fly in conjunction with scheduled storm flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) out of MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa and the U.S. Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron from Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The study is part of NASA’s Earth Science enterprise to better understand the total Earth system and the effects of natural and human-induced changes on the global environment KSC-98pc911

Inside this NASA Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8, which was on view at Patrick Air Force Base, visitors get a close-up look at the instruments that will be used to collect high-altitude information about Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms as part of a NASA-led Atmospheric Dynamics and Remote Sensing program. The DC-8 is one of two aircraft being flown in a study through September to learn about the storms from top to bottom. The other plane, a modified U2, and the DC-8 will fly in conjunction with scheduled storm flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) out of MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa and the U.S. Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron from Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The hurricane study is part of NASA’s Earth Science enterprise to better understand the total Earth system and the effects of natural and human-induced changes on the global environment KSC-98pc910

Eric Paolini (Left) and Danny Umfress inspect a 28-foot antenna that gathers solar information from nearly 93-million miles away. Its mission is to report real-time solar events to the 55th, the Department of Defense's sole centralized space environmental forecast and warning unit, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Operation Center at Boulder, Colorado. This image is seen in the November 1998 issue of AIRMAN Magazine

A wide angle, fish eye view of Eric Paolini (Left) and Danny Umfress as they inspect a 28-foot antenna that gathers solar information from nearly 93-million miles away. Its mission is to report real-time solar events to the 55th, the Department of Defense's sole centralized space environmental forecast and warning unit, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Operation Center at Boulder, Colorado. This image is seen in the November 1998 issue of AIRMAN Magazine

View inside a computerized control room as Graham Stewart (left) reviews solar burst data and Dean Cummings tracks a sunspot. Their mission is to report real-time solar events to the 55th, the Department of Defense's sole centralized space environmental forecast and warning unit, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Operation Center at Boulder, Colorado. This image is seen in the November 1998 issue of AIRMAN Magazine

Right side profile, medium close-up from the chest up at Danny Umfress as he shines an all day scope that San Vito Solar Observatory analysts, who work inside a windowless building, use to see when clouds are forming. Their mission is to report real-time solar events to the 55th, the Department of Defense's sole centralized space environmental forecast and warning unit, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Operation Center at Boulder, Colorado. This image is seen in the November 1998 issue of AIRMAN Magazine

Left side profile, medium close-up of Steve Blome as he completes his daily sunspot drawings that help forecasters predict solar weather. His mission is to report real-time solar events to the 55th, the Department of Defense's sole centralized space environmental forecast and warning unit, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Operation Center at Boulder, Colorado. This image is seen in the November 1998 issue of AIRMAN Magazine

The GOES-L weather satellite, aboard the trailer, is moved into a building at Astrotech in Titusville for testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in March or April, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-98pc1874

The GOES-L weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in March or April, is covered and waiting on a semi-trailer truck (in background) that will transport it to Astrotech in Titusville for final testing. It arrived aboard the C-5 air cargo plane (seen in foreground) at CCAS. GOES-L, the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-98pc1873

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., check out the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc18

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deployment on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. Other tests to be performed are the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc21

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., stand back as they deploy the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc17

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., deploy one of the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc16

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deployment on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. Other tests to be performed are the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc22

The solar panels on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite are fully deployed. Final testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems also will be performed at the Astrotech facility, Titusville, Fla. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc19

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., perform an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc26

Workers (right) at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., arrange the lights for an illumination test on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The test is verifying the circuitry on the panel. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc29

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc28

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc30

A Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., assists with an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc27

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technician Roberto Caballero tests the deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The sounder, one of two meteorological instruments on the satellite, measures temperature and moisture in a vertical column of air from the satellite to Earth. Its findings will help forecast weather. GOES-L, which is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures as well as perform the atmospheric sounding. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc50

In a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technician Roberto Caballero checks the position of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite before beginning deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door. The sounder, one of two meteorological instruments on the satellite, measures temperature and moisture in a vertical column of air from the satellite to Earth. Its findings will help forecast weather. GOES-L, which is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures as well as perform the atmospheric sounding. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc52

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technicians Roberto Caballero (left) and Paul Giordano (right) maneuver the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite into position for testing the deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door. The sounder, one of two meteorological instruments on the satellite, measures temperature and moisture in a vertical column of air from the satellite to Earth. Its findings will help forecast weather. GOES-L, which is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures as well as perform the atmospheric sounding. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc51

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure a Centaur upper stage on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (right). After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0387

At Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers help guide the crane lifting a Centaur upper stage onto a transporter. The Centaur arrived at CCAS aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c (far left). After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0388

An Atlas IIA rocket is transported from Cape Canaveral Air Station after its arrival aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0385

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading an Atlas IIA rocket from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36B on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0383

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure an Atlas IIA rocket on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (left). The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0384

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading a Centaur upper stage from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0386

Workers at Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L satellite for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0393

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L satellite sits ready for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0395

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., GOES-L Program Manager Gerald Dittberner, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) talks with a journalist during a media showing of the GOES-L satellite in the background. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0394

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket seen behind it. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0427

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is mated to the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0429

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is moved into place above the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0428

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket already in place. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0426

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite undergoes encapsulation in the first half of the fairing before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. At right is the second half of the fairing. The mounted equipment on top of the satellite is a telemetry and command antenna. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0490

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the fully encapsulated GOES-L weather satellite is ready for transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0493

Workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L weather satellite for encapsulation in the fairing (left and right) before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The mounted equipment on top of the satellite is a telemetry and command antenna. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0491

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand, ready to be encapsulated for its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space KSC-99pp0488

The GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., ready to be encapsulated for its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. On the left side is the folded, two-panel solar array; on the adjoining side is a white box, which is the UHF antenna. Above the box is the S-band transmit antenna and receive antenna. Between them protrudes a search and rescue antenna. At right are the sounder (top) and imager (bottom). The mounted equipment on top of the unit is a telemetry and command antenna. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space KSC-99pp0489

Workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., move the second half of the fairing to finish encapsulating the GOES-L weather satellite before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0492

Workers at Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide an encapsulated GOES-L weather satellite up the gantry for mating to a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch later this month KSC-99pp0498