PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

The Bee Bots team (393) robot, named Dr. Beevil, scores by gathering balls. The team is composed of students from Morristown Jr. and Sr. high schools in Morristown, Ind., and is co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and IPT Inc. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0330

The Space Coast FIRST Team (233) works on their robot, which is named RoccoBot, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Rockledge and Cocoa Beach high schools was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center, Lockheed Martin and Dynacs. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0324

The Space Coast FIRST Team (233) works on their robot, which is named RoccoBot, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Rockledge and Cocoa Beach high schools was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center, Lockheed Martin and Dynacs. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0324

The Hero Team (278) gets some help from a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop in repairing their robot, named Hero. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0334

The Roboticks team (408) carries their robot, which is named R2K, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Blanche Ely High School in Ft. Lauderdale was co-sponsored by Nortel Networks and NASA Kennedy Space Center. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0326

Voltage: The South Brevard FIRST Team (386) works on their robot, Sparky. The team of students from Eau Gallie, Satellite, Palm Bay, Melbourne, Bayside and Melbourne Central Catholic high schools was co-sponsored by Intersil Corp., Harris Corp., NASA Kennedy Space Center, Rockwell Collins and Interface & Control Systems, Inc. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0327

The Bee Bots team (393) robot, named Dr. Beevil, scores by gathering balls. The team is composed of students from Morristown Jr. and Sr. high schools in Morristown, Ind., and is co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and IPT Inc. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0330

The Hero Team (278) robot, named Hero, is repaired in a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0335

The Hero Team (278) gets some help from a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop in repairing their robot, named Hero. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0334

The Orange Crusher team (282) works on their robot, which is named Rust Bot, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Lake Howell, Winter Springs and Orange Christian Private high schools was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center, Matern Professional Engineering The Foundation, Control Technologies, Lucent Technologies and Sandy Engineering. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusvill KSC00pp0325

The Orange Crusher team (282) works on their robot, which is named Rust Bot, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Lake Howell, Winter Springs and Orange Christian Private high schools was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center, Matern Professional Engineering The Foundation, Control Technologies, Lucent Technologies and Sandy Engineering. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusvill KSC-00pp0325

The Hero Team (278) robot, named Hero, is repaired in a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0349

The Hero Team (278) robot, named Hero, is repaired in a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0335

The Roboticks team (408) carries their robot, which is named R2K, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Blanche Ely High School in Ft. Lauderdale was co-sponsored by Nortel Networks and NASA Kennedy Space Center. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC-00pp0326

Voltage: The South Brevard FIRST Team (386) works on their robot, Sparky. The team of students from Eau Gallie, Satellite, Palm Bay, Melbourne, Bayside and Melbourne Central Catholic high schools was co-sponsored by Intersil Corp., Harris Corp., NASA Kennedy Space Center, Rockwell Collins and Interface & Control Systems, Inc. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0327

The Hero Team (278) robot, named Hero, is repaired in a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville KSC00pp0349

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College-sponsored students, participating in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition, demonstrate their team spirit. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. The team won the DaimlerChrysler Team Spirit Award and the Johnson & Johnson Sportsmanship Award. Forty teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA-Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind. KSC-03pd0805

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College-sponsored students, participating in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition, pose with their team-built robot. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA-Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind. KSC-03pd0806

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA/Kennedy Space Center-sponsored students, participating in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition, pose with their team-built robot. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA-Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind. KSC-03pd0807

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the Merritt Island and Edgewood Middle School students/Lockheed Martin team look over their robot. They are participating in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA-Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind. KSC-03pd0904

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the Merritt Island and Edgewood Middle School students/Lockheed Martin team maneuver their robot during competition. They are participating in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA-Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind. KSC-03pd0903

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Merritt Island and Edgewood Middle School students/Lockheed Martin team, participating in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition, work on their team-built robot. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA-Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind. KSC-03pd0902

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. He has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. He has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. He has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials participate in a press conference in KSC's Press Site Auditorium. From left are NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy, KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy, and KSC Director Roy D. Bridges. The press conference followed the official announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Roy D. Bridges addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy participates in a press conference in KSC's Press Site Auditorium. The press conference followed the official announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. From left are Readdy, KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges, and NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) receives the applause of KSC Director Roy D. Bridges (right) and a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy address a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy (left) and NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe shake hands before a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy applauds, at right. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Roy D. Bridges addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) congratulates James W. Kennedy (right) before a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges receives the applause of NASA officials and a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. From left are Bridges, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy, and KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy (left) and KSC Director Roy D. Bridges shake hands before a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials participate in a press conference in KSC's Press Site Auditorium. From left are KSC Deputy Director of External Relations and Business Development Lisa Malone, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F. Readdy, KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy, and KSC Director Roy D. Bridges. The press conference followed the official announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. KSC Director Roy D. Bridges (right) also spoke. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy receives the news of his appointment as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) before a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director James W. Kennedy addresses a group of KSC employees assembled in the KSC Training Auditorium, as KSC Director Roy D. Bridges looks on (right). The occasion is the announcement of Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director of External Relations and Business Development Lisa Malone and NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe participate in a press conference in KSC's Press Site Auditorium. The press conference followed the official announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, KSC Director Roy D. Bridges, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, and NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy share a light moment on the stage in the KSC Training Auditorium. The occasion is the announcement of James W. Kennedy as the next director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's deputy director since November 2002. He will succeed Bridges, who was appointed on June 13 to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Official portrait of James W. Kennedy, the director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida from August 2003 to January 2007.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Frank T. Brogan, president of the Florida Atlantic University, speaks at a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Space Life Sciences Lab hosted by NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida at the new lab. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Dignitaries, invited guests, space center employees, and the media gather for a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Space Life Sciences Lab hosted by NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida at the new lab. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Honorable Toni Jennings (left), lieutenant governor of the state of Florida, and Frank T. Brogan, president of Florida Atlantic University, receive a briefing on the research that will be conducted in the Space Life Sciences Lab from Dr. Robert J. Ferl (right), director of Space Agriculture Biotechnology Research and Education (SABRE), University of Florida. Jennings and Brogan are speaking at a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the lab hosted by NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida at the new lab. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Dignitaries, invited guests, space center employees, and the media show their appreciation for the speakers at a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Space Life Sciences Lab hosted by NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida at the new lab. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Capt. Winston Scott, executive director of the Florida Space Authority, speaks at a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Space Life Sciences Lab hosted by NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida at the new lab. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Officials of the NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida pose for a group portrait at a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Space Life Sciences Lab at the new lab. From left are Capt. Winston Scott, executive director of the Florida Space Authority; Dr. Robert J. Ferl, director of Space Agriculture Biotechnology Research and Education (SABRE), University of Florida; Charlie Quincy, chief of the Biological Sciences Office, Kennedy Space Center; Jose Perez-Morales, NASA Project Manager for the Space Life Sciences Lab; Jim Kennedy, director of the Kennedy Space Center; The Honorable Toni Jennings, lieutenant governor of the state of Florida; Frank T. Brogan, president of the Florida Atlantic University; and Dr. Samuel Durrance, executive director of the Florida Space Research Institute. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Dignitaries, invited guests, space center employees, and the media gather for a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Space Life Sciences Lab hosted by NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the state of Florida at the new lab. Completed in August, the facility encompasses more than 100,000 square feet and was formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory or SERPL. The state, through the Florida Space Authority, built the research lab which is host to NASA, NASA’s Life Sciences Services contractor Dynamac Corp., Bionetics Corp., and researchers from the University of Florida. Dynamac Corp. leases the facility. The Florida Space Research Institute is responsible for gaining additional tenants from outside the NASA community.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A young Yellow-Crowned Night Heron perches on a tree limb in a wooded area of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Its habitat is wooded swamps and coastal thickets, ranging from Massachusetts to Florida, west to Texas, and north along the Mississippi River. The Center shares a boundary with the 92,000-acre Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. KSC-04pd0199

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An alligator slides off a bank into the water on the west side of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds and waterways throughout the Center and the surrounding Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. KSC-04pd0200

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A young Yellow-Crowned Night Heron soars through the sky over NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. It’s habitat is wooded swamps and coastal thickets, ranging from Massachusetts to Florida, west to Texas, and north along the Mississippi River. The Center shares a boundary with the 92,000-acre Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. KSC-04pd0202

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Two young Little Blue Herons perch on a limb in the underbrush at a site on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. These herons inhabit freshwater swamps and lagoons in the South; coastal thickets on islands in the North. Adults are slate blue with maroon necks. Young birds acquiring adult plumage have a piebald appearance. The Center shares a boundary with the 92,000-acre Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. KSC-04pd0204

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A moss-covered alligator stretches out on the water’s edge at a bank on the west side of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds and waterways throughout the Center and the surrounding Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. KSC-04pd0203

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Portrait of James W. Kennedy, the director of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida from August 2003 to January 2007. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd0758

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Former astronaut Robert Crippen smiles at the warm greeting he is receiving when introduced as a previous inductee into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. He and other Hall of Fame members were present for the induction of five new space program heroes into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame: Richard O. Covey, commander of the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission; Norman E. Thagard, the first American to occupy Russia’s Mir space station; the late Francis R. "Dick" Scobee, commander of the ill-fated 1986 Challenger mission; Kathryn D. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space; and Frederick D. Gregory, the first African-American to command a space mission and the current NASA deputy administrator. Crippen piloted the first Space Shuttle flight in 1981 and commanded three other Shuttle missions in the next 3-1/2 years. In the early 1990s he served as director of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The induction ceremony was held at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The five inductees join 52 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs. KSC-04pd1015

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Two wild pigs cross railroad tracks on grounds at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The wild pigs have flourished in the environs around KSC, which shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, without many predators other than panthers and humans. Pigs were introduced to Florida in the 1500s and are now found statewide in wooded areas close to water. Pigs are omnivores, foraging on the ground and rooting just beneath the surface, which damages the groundcover. Wild pigs eat almost anything that has nutritional value, including tubers, roots, shoots, acorns, fruits, berries, earthworms, amphibians, reptiles and rodents. Appearance is similar to domestic hogs, but leaner, with a longer, narrower head and a coarser, denser coat. Females may have two litters per year. The piglets are weaned in a few weeks but remain with the mother for several months. KSC-05pd2263

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft are being covered by a protective container before their transport to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2276

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, one of the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft is offloaded from the Russian cargo plane. The fairing halves will be transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2274

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, one of the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft is moved away from the Russian cargo plane that delivered it. Behind the truck is the mate/demate device at the landing facility. The fairing halves will be transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2275

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Russian cargo plane sits on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center with the Atlas V fairing for the New Horizons spacecraft inside. The two fairing halves will be removed, loaded onto trucks and transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2271

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft have been offloaded from the Russian cargo plane (background). The fairing halves will be transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2273

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center Training Auditorium, Major Jack Owens talks to employees during the kickoff presentation for the Combined Federal Campaign at the center. Owens is commanding officer of the Salvation Army in North and Central Brevard County in Florida. Other speakers included Janet Bryant, executive director and CEO of the American Red Cross, Brevard County Chapter and Rob Rains, president of United Way of Brevard. The campaign seeks voluntary donations from Federal civilian, postal and military workers during the campaign season to support eligible nonprofit organizations that provide health and human service benefits throughout the world. KSC-05pd2290

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center Training Auditorium, President of United Way in Brevard Rob Rains (left) and Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) recognize James Hall (center) who submitted the winning theme for the center’s 2005 Combined Federal Campaign, “Launching Dreams of Those in Need.” The occasion was the kickoff of the campaign at the center. Guest speakers included Janet Bryant, executive director and CEO of the American Red Cross, Brevard County Chapter; Major Jack Owens, commanding officer of the Salvation Army, North/Central Brevard; and Rob Rains, president of United Way of Brevard. The campaign seeks voluntary donations from Federal civilian, postal and military workers during the campaign season to support eligible nonprofit organizations that provide health and human service benefits throughout the world. KSC-05pd2291

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center Training Auditorium, Center Director Jim Kennedy talks to employees at the kickoff of the 2005 Combined Federal Campaign at the center. Guest speakers included Janet Bryant, executive director and CEO of the American Red Cross, Brevard County Chapter; Major Jack Owens, commanding officer of the Salvation Army, North/Central Brevard; and Rob Rains, president of United Way of Brevard. The campaign seeks voluntary donations from Federal civilian, postal and military workers during the campaign season to support eligible nonprofit organizations that provide health and human service benefits throughout the world. KSC-05pd2292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - External tank #120 approaches the barge Pegasus, docked at the Turn Basin on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. When the tank is loaded onto the barge, it will be towed to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2334

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - External tank #120 rolls into the barge Pegasus, docked at the Turn Basin on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. After the tank is fully loaded onto the barge, it will be towed to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2336

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - External tank #120 is carefully maneuvered onto the barge Pegasus, docked at the Turn Basin on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. After the tank is loaded onto the barge, it will be transported to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2335

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - External tank #120, still resting on its transporter, is secured inside the barge Pegasus, docked at the Turn Basin on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The tank and barge will be towed to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2337

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The driver of the external tank transporter maneuvers external tank #120 toward the nearby Turn Basin on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center where the barge Pegasus is waiting (right). The barge will be towed to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2333

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the distance, a tug boat maneuvers the Pegasus barge out of the Turn Basin at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The barge is carrying external tank #120, which is being returned to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. The barge is being moved to Port Canaveral where one of NASA’s solid rocket booster retrieval ships will take it and tow it around the Florida peninsula to Michoud. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2339

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An alligator spotted near the Launch Pad 39 area at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center raises its head above the water. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds and waterways throughout the Center and the surrounding Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. KSC-05pd2341

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Pegasus barge (right) is pushed away from the dock in the Turn Basin at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The barge is carrying external tank #120, which is being returned to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for additional modifications. The barge is being moved to Port Canaveral where one of NASA’s solid rocket booster retrieval ships will take it and tow it around the Florida peninsula to Michoud. This tank is the first of the newly designed tanks that were delivered to Kennedy. Previously, the tank was stacked with Discovery and, more recently, Atlantis. The tank has already gone through two tanking cycles during tanking tests but was replaced with tank #121 for Discovery’s return to flight mission STS-114. KSC-05pd2338

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An alligator near the Launch Pad 39 area at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center appears not very happy being spotted in the water. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds and waterways throughout the Center and the surrounding Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. KSC-05pd2342

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In a pond near the Launch Pad 39 area at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, an alligator hides in the shadows under overhanging branches. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds and waterways throughout the Center and the surrounding Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. KSC-05pd2340

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers at the NASA Kennedy Space Center mop up water inside a building following the wrath of hurricane Wilma as it crossed the state Oct. 24. Kennedy’s facilities sustained minor structural damage, primarily to roofs or from water intrusion. The Vehicle Assembly Building lost some panels on the east and west sides. Some facilities lost power. A total of 13.6 inches of rain was recorded at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The highest wind gust recorded was 94 mph from the north-northwest at Launch Pad 39B, while the maximum sustained wind was 76 mph from the north-northwest at the top of the 492-foot weather tower located north of the Vehicle Assembly Building. KSC-05pd2354

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi speaks to employees. At right is Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson. They and other crew members are visiting several sites during their return to Kennedy Space Center. They have returned to Florida especially for a celebration in the KSC Visitor Complex of the successful return to flight mission that launched July 26 of this year. KSC-05pd2368

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, employees crowd around STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson as he signs mementos for them. Robinson joined Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi to talk to the employees about their successful mission. They and other crew members are visiting several sites during their return to Kennedy Space Center. They have returned to Florida especially for a celebration in the KSC Visitor Complex of the successful return to flight mission that launched July 26 of this year. KSC-05pd2371

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson speaks to employees. At right is Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi. They and other crew members are visiting several sites during their return to Kennedy Space Center. They have returned to Florida especially for a celebration in the KSC Visitor Complex of the successful return to flight mission that launched July 26 of this year. KSC-05pd2369

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson speak to a crowd of employees. They and other crew members are visiting several sites during their return to Kennedy Space Center. They have returned to Florida especially for a celebration in the KSC Visitor Complex of the successful return to flight mission that launched July 26 of this year. KSC-05pd2370

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An aerial view of Launch Pad 39A at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. Atop the fixed service structure is the 80-foot-tall lightning mast. At right is the 290-foot-tall water tower that holds 300,000 gallons of water used at launch for sound suppression to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and Mobile Launcher Platform during launch. KSC-05pd2404

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An aerial view of Launch Pad 39A at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the background at left is the Vehicle Assembly Building. KSC-05pd2403

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Another aerial view of Launch Pad 39A at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the background at right is the Vehicle Assembly Building. Atop the fixed service structure is the 80-foot-tall lightning mast. In front is the 290-foot-tall water tower that holds 300,000 gallons of water used at launch for sound suppression to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and Mobile Launcher Platform during launch. KSC-05pd2405

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the remote manipulator system boom is lifted away from Atlantis’ payload bay and will be temporarily stored. The RMS includes the electromechanical arm that maneuvers a payload from the payload bay of the orbiter to its deployment position and then releases it. It can also grapple a free-flying payload, maneuver it to the payload bay of the orbiter and berth it in the orbiter. The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. KSC-05pd2467

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the remote manipulator system boom that was removed from Atlantis’ payload bay is lifted out of the way. The boom will be temporarily stored. The RMS includes the electromechanical arm that maneuvers a payload from the payload bay of the orbiter to its deployment position and then releases it. It can also grapple a free-flying payload, maneuver it to the payload bay of the orbiter and berth it in the orbiter. The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. KSC-05pd2468

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, workers secure a crane to the remote manipulator system boom in Atlantis’ payload bay. The boom is being removed from Atlantis and will be temporarily stored.. The RMS includes the electromechanical arm that maneuvers a payload from the payload bay of the orbiter to its deployment position and then releases it. It can also grapple a free-flying payload, maneuver it to the payload bay of the orbiter and berth it in the orbiter. The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. KSC-05pd2465

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, a crane is attached to the remote manipulator system boom in Atlantis’ payload bay. The boom is being removed from Atlantis and will be temporarily stored. The RMS includes the electromechanical arm that maneuvers a payload from the payload bay of the orbiter to its deployment position and then releases it. It can also grapple a free-flying payload, maneuver it to the payload bay of the orbiter and berth it in the orbiter. The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. KSC-05pd2464

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, a crane is lowered toward the remote manipulator system boom in Atlantis’ payload bay. The boom is being removed from Atlantis and will be temporarily stored. The RMS includes the electromechanical arm that maneuvers a payload from the payload bay of the orbiter to its deployment position and then releases it. It can also grapple a free-flying payload, maneuver it to the payload bay of the orbiter and berth it in the orbiter. The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. KSC-05pd2463

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, a crane lifts the remote manipulator system boom out of Atlantis’ payload bay. The boom will be temporarily stored. The RMS includes the electromechanical arm that maneuvers a payload from the payload bay of the orbiter to its deployment position and then releases it. It can also grapple a free-flying payload, maneuver it to the payload bay of the orbiter and berth it in the orbiter. The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. KSC-05pd2466

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RLV Hangar at NASA Kennedy Space Center, employees prepare a blanket sewing machine to be transferred back to the Thermal Protection System (TPS) facility. The upper floor of the facility, where soft material was processed, was damaged during the 2004 hurricanes. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2513

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Employees at NASA Kennedy Space Center are transferring equipment stored in the RLV Hangar back to the Thermal Protection System (TPS) facility. The upper floor of the facility, where soft material was processed, was damaged during the 2004 hurricanes. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2511

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - One of the blanket sewing machines used on Thermal Protection System materials has been returned to the TPS facility. It was moved to the RLV Hangar at NASA Kennedy Space Center after the 2004 hurricanes damaged the upper floor, where soft material was processed, of the TPS facility. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2515

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Employees at NASA Kennedy Space Center are moving equipment out of the RLV Hangar, where it was stored, and returning it to the Thermal Protection System (TPS) facility. The upper floor of the facility, where soft material was processed, was damaged during the 2004 hurricanes. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2512

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RLV Hangar at NASA Kennedy Space Center, employees move equipment being returned to the Thermal Protection System (TPS) facility. The upper floor, where soft material was processed, was damaged during the 2004 hurricanes. While the TPS facility was being repaired, normal work activity was done in the hangar. KSC-05pd2514

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, workers in clean room suits guide the New Horizons spacecraft toward the stand at left with the third stage, or upper booster, a Boeing STAR 48 solid-propellant kick motor. The launch vehicle for New Horizons is the Atlas V rocket, scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., during a 35-day window that opens Jan. 11, and fly through the Pluto system as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2578

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, workers in clean room suits help lift the New Horizons spacecraft from its work stand. It will be moved across the room and mated with the third stage, or upper booster, a Boeing STAR 48 solid-propellant kick motor. The launch vehicle for New Horizons is the Atlas V rocket, scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., during a 35-day window that opens Jan. 11, and fly through the Pluto system as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2577

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, workers in clean room suits attach an overhead crane to NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft. The spacecraft will be lifted and moved for mating with the third stage, or upper booster, a Boeing STAR 48 solid-propellant kick motor. The launch vehicle for New Horizons is the Atlas V rocket, scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., during a 35-day window that opens Jan. 11, and fly through the Pluto system as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2576