PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians release the overhead crane from the shipping container placed around one of the five THEMIS probes for its move to the hazardous processing facility.  There the probes will be placed on a stand in preparation for fueling operations.  Once fueling is complete, each probe will be weighed and individually mated to the payload carrier before pyrotechnics are installed. The fully integrated THEMIS payload is then ready for spin-balance testing and weighing. The final milestone is mating THEMIS to its upper stage booster. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. These lights are the visible manifestations of invisible energy releases, called geomagnetic substorms, in near-Earth space. THEMIS will not only seek to answer where and when substorms start, but will also provide clues as to how and why these space storms create havoc on satellites, terrestrial power grids, and communication systems.  THEMIS will be transported to Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on February 1 for mating to the Delta II rocket.  Launch is scheduled for Feb. 15.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2815
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians release the overhead crane from the shipping container placed around one of the five THEMIS probes for its move to the hazardous processing facility. There the probes will be placed on a stand in preparation for fueling operations. Once fueling is complete, each probe will be weighed and individually mated to the payload carrier before pyrotechnics are installed. The fully integrated THEMIS payload is then ready for spin-balance testing and weighing. The final milestone is mating THEMIS to its upper stage booster. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. These lights are the visible manifestations of invisible energy releases, called geomagnetic substorms, in near-Earth space. THEMIS will not only seek to answer where and when substorms start, but will also provide clues as to how and why these space storms create havoc on satellites, terrestrial power grids, and communication systems. THEMIS will be transported to Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on February 1 for mating to the Delta II rocket. Launch is scheduled for Feb. 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2815
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians are preparing one of five THEMIS probes to be secured inside a shipping container (behind it).  The probes are being moved to the hazardous processing facility where they will be placed on a stand in preparation for fueling operations. Once fueling is complete, each probe will be weighed and individually mated to the payload carrier before pyrotechnics are installed. The fully integrated THEMIS payload is then ready for spin-balance testing and weighing. The final milestone is mating THEMIS to its upper stage booster. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. These lights are the visible manifestations of invisible energy releases, called geomagnetic substorms, in near-Earth space. THEMIS will not only seek to answer where and when substorms start, but will also provide clues as to how and why these space storms create havoc on satellites, terrestrial power grids, and communication systems.  THEMIS will be transported to Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on February 1 for mating to the Delta II rocket.  Launch is scheduled for Feb. 15.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2812
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians are preparing one of five THEMIS probes to be secured inside a shipping container (behind it). The probes are being moved to the hazardous processing facility where they will be placed on a stand in preparation for fueling operations. Once fueling is complete, each probe will be weighed and individually mated to the payload carrier before pyrotechnics are installed. The fully integrated THEMIS payload is then ready for spin-balance testing and weighing. The final milestone is mating THEMIS to its upper stage booster. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. These lights are the visible manifestations of invisible energy releases, called geomagnetic substorms, in near-Earth space. THEMIS will not only seek to answer where and when substorms start, but will also provide clues as to how and why these space storms create havoc on satellites, terrestrial power grids, and communication systems. THEMIS will be transported to Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on February 1 for mating to the Delta II rocket. Launch is scheduled for Feb. 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2812