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Sword with Scabbard Mounts

Sword with Scabbard Mounts

Sword with Scabbard Mounts

Sword with Scabbard Mounts

Sword with Scabbard Mounts

Matrices for Sword Mounts

Jasper Cup with Gilded-Silver Mounts

Bag for Game with Iron Mounts

A Gentleman Mounts a Step

Pair of leg mounts

Set of four mounts

Smallsword Hilt and Scabbard Mounts

Crystal Vessel with Ornamented Metal Lid, Foot, Handle and Mounts

Door Knockers and Mounts from Rouen Cathedral, Goodwich Court, etc. (recto and verso)

Vase mounts (one of a pair)

Vase mounts (one of a pair)

Mounts Adams and Madison from Mt. Washington.

Mounts Adams and Madison from Mt. Washington.

Mounts Franklin, Pleasant and Clinton, from Jacob's Ladder.

Mounts Franklin, Pleasant and Clinton, from Jacob's Ladder.

[Woman assisted by man as she mounts or dismounts a donkey in Alexandria, Egypt]

Mounts, John - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]

Cabinet with gold mounts and relief

Mounts, Richard C - Age [Blank], Year: [Blank] - Eleventh Infantry - West Virginia

Mounts, Andrew Q - Age [Blank], Year: [Blank] - Eleventh Infantry - West Virginia

[Mounts Tom and Holyoke from U.S. Armory tower, Springfield, Mass.]

Exercising the mounts / Frank A. Nankivell 1907.

Late eighteenth-century decorative furniture. In the drawing-room of R. W. Hudson, Esq., Park Lane, W. Satinwood and mahogany inlaid pianoforte, with Wedgwood plaques, ormolu mounts, panel and stars, presented by Manuel Godoy to the Queen of Spain in 1796. Painted satinwood chairs and shaped cabinet.

Carved walnut bombé armoire with chased mounts. Property of Dr. Burghard. Carved oak stairway, Guildford.

Inlaid satinwood commode. Ormolu mounts. Property of Henry Hirsch, Esq., ca. 1780.

Circular table of various marbles, with chased gilt mounts. French: style of the First Empire. Palace of Fontainebleau. Folding screen (paravent) of carved and gilt wood with silk panels. French: style of the First Empire.

Upright secrétaire inlaid in various woods, with cast, chased, and gilt bronze mounts. The woodwork by Charles Saunier. The marqueterie by Foulet (French transitional Louis XV-XVI style, ca. 1765.) The Wallace collection, Hertford House, Manchester Square, London.

Vargueno cabinet of chestnut, ivory, etc., painted and gilt with wrought-iron and steel mounts: upon twisted, turned, and carved stand. Parnham collection.

[U.S. Army cavalrymen standing with their mounts. El Paso, Tex., Feb. 1912]

Officers mounts in shell wrecked house. Ebricourt. 1-1-1918

Airplanes - Ordnance - Gun mounts. Ordnance Equipment for seaplanes built at Naval Aircraft Factory, Phila., PA. 1049 N.A.F. C-1 boat, side bow view, showing H.A. bomb sight, directing bomb sigh and Lewis gun. Naval Aircraft Factory

Airplanes - Ordnance - Flexible airplane gun mounts manufactured by F. Wesel Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. Front view of flexible scarf ring gun mount. Rec'd from F. Wesel Mfg, Co

Airplanes - Ordnance - Flexible airplane gun mounts manufactured by F. Wesel Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. This view shows a section in the lathe department in the manufacture of scarf ring gun mounts, where the aluminum rings are machined by especially designed lathes. Rec'd from F. Wesel Mfg.. Co

Airplanes - Ordnance - Flexible airplane gun mounts manufactured by F. Wesel Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. Sectional view of the assembling department. The scarf ring gun mounts are here assembled on the revolving ring, inspected by the Government inspector and passed for the final assembling and again inspected and sealed with the inspector's official seal. They are then crated and shipped to their destination. Rec'd from F. Wesel Mfg. Co

Airplanes - Ordnance - Gun mounts. Ordnance Equipment for seaplanes built at Naval Aircraft Factory, Phila., PA. F-5-l No. 1, nose view, showing scarf mount gun and pilot's directing bomb sight. Naval Aircraft Factory

Airplanes - Ordnance - Gun mounts. Ordnance Equipment for seaplanes built at Naval Aircraft Factory, Phila., PA. Triple gun mount on F-5-L top. Front view. Naval Aircraft Factory

Airplanes - Ordnance - Flexible airplane gun mounts manufactured by F. Wesel Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. This gun mount is mounted on airplane, securely fastened to the rims of the plane by bolts. The gunner sits inside of the ring, his back resting against the back rest as shown in the picture. He wears a belt, which by extensions on each side, is fastened to the eye-bolts as shown in the brackets. Material used in revolving ring, aluminum; in quadrants and tubing steel; in brackets, aluminum; in forks, brass. Rec'd from F. Wesel Mfg. Co

The Seven Mounts (Siebengebirge), Rhine

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. Machined to watch-like precision, these hundreds of parts which go into Bofors forty-millimeter anti-aircraft gun mounts and carriages for the U.S. Army must pass the most rigid inspection tests before they can be accepted in the Bofors manufacture. This employee of a large Midwest rubber company, now converted to production of war necessities, examines some of the 1,500 separate parts which are required in the assembling of the Bofors mounts and carriages

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. The machine of bronze rings gears for the production of Bofors forty-millimeter anti-aircraft guns mounts and carriages at a large Midwest rubber factory involves skilled precision operations. Here an expert workman is making the final cut on a vertical turret lathe. When this operation is complete, the bronze ring will be moved to the gear for the concluding operation

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. Gears for guns-for-victory. Hundreds of these precision cut gears roll off specially designed gear-cutters daily in the Bofors plant of a large rubber factory. When assembled, they'll be part of the Bofors forty- millimeter anti-aircraft gun mounts and carriages, some of the war essentials now manufactured in a plant whose sole product used to be tires for the family sedan

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. A plant inspector carefully checks welded gun carriages for Bofors forty-millimeter anti-aircraft guns. These carriages and Bofor gun mounts are now manufactured in a large Midwest rubber company which has been converted to production of war necessities. Originally, Bofors carriages were riveted and required many additional operations in assembling, but company engineers have produced this welded construction which has reduced time and cost of manufacture and produced a much stronger, one-piece article

The air raid protective services. Ever on the alert is the firewatcher, who mounts to a rooftop at the first alarm. He is responsible for detecting incendiary bombs, and is trained in the methods of fighting them

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. The final operation in the manufacture of gun carriages for the Bofors forty-millimeter anti-aircraft guns is taking place on this horizontal milling machine. A workman of a large Midwest rubber company converted to war production is milling the top bearing trunion pads or supports. When this operation is complete, the carriage will be ready for attachment to the chassis which supports the gun and barrel

Defense housing, Erie, Pennsylvania. The wall sheeting mounts rapidly. Pre-cut sheeting is always at hand to keep this carpenter supplied, thereby cutting down waste time

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. He has a vital job in the manufacture of forty-millimeter Bofors gun mounts and carriages. This arc welder wearing a protective mask is completing a skilled operation on part of a gun mount in a large Midwest rubber factory now converted to war production

Production. BT-13A ("Valiant") basic trainers. Parts of motor mounts for "Valiant" basic trainers stacked at the Vultee factory in Downey, California. At the Downey plant is made the BT-13A ("Valiant") basic trainer--a fast, sturdy ship powered by a Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Fixing up a grab-bag for Hitler. This worker packs thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts in an Eastern factory formerly devoted to assembly of locks and safes. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Production. Naval gun mounts. A mount ring for a big naval gun is checked as skilled workers in a large Midwest machine shop complete layouts work that guides later machining operations. Westinghouse, Louisville, Kentucky

Production. Naval gun mounts. A big naval gun mount chassis is coated with aluminum paint before proceeding to assembly operations in a Midwest plant. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Naval gun mounts. A naval gun mount assembly, one of many produced in a Midwest plant, is carefully inspected before shipment to an undisclosed destination. Westinghouse, Louisville

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Checking and inspection of thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts for America's armed forces in a factory once devoted to manufacture of safes and locks for civilian use. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Women who are welders discuss the production of motor mounts and welded parts in their department

Production. Naval gun mounts. Periods of relaxation are short for the men who make big naval gun mounts in a Midwest facotry. A quick lunch, a few hands of cards, and they're back at the job of providing Uncle Sam the tools of war. Westinghouse, Louisville, Kentucky

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling weapons for Victory to be used by the armed forces. Gerald Smith, twenty-eight, assembles thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts in a factory which formerly made safes and locks. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Guns to blast the Axis from the earth. A factory which formerly produced locks and safes now produces thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts. Here the grinder goes into action on a gun. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Production. Torpedo tube mounts. Scraping the teeth of a torpedo tube base in a Midwest plant engaged in large-scale production of mounts for torpedo tubes and large naval guns. Westinghouse, Louisville

Conversion. Floor waxer plant. He used to be a weaver and repair man for looms, but he's one of Uncle Sam's defense workers now. Employed by a small Eastern floor waxer manufacturing firm, this worker now spends ninty-nine percent of his time working on small parts for gun mounts. Here, however, he's working on the remainder of the floor waxer stock left in the plant. Orders for the shop's peacetime products can still be filled from stock, but no new waxers are being made. Floorola Products Inc., York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Workers give the once-over to thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts being assembled in a factory which formerly manufactured safes and locks for civilian use. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Checking and inspection of thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts for America's armed forces in a factory once devoted to manufacture of safes and locks for civilian use. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Painting thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts now produced in a factory which formerly made safes and locks for civilian use. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling the weapons of Victory. In a factory which formerly manufactured safes and locks, Uncle Sam's armed forces are being provided with thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts to blast the Axis off the map. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Production. Naval gun mounts. Final finishing of a large naval gun mount is well under way as workmen of a Midwest machine shop do a careful job of scraping surfaces. Westinghouse, Louisville

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Guns to blast the Axis from the earth. A factory which formerly produced locks and safes now produces thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Production. Naval gun mounts. Big naval gun mounts produced in a Midwest factory shipped at a steadily increasing rate to undisclosed destinations. Westinghouse, Louisville, Kentucky

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Basing off the breech end of a thirty-seven-millimeter gun, this young worker is one of the millions of Americans hard at work behind the men behind the guns. Site of these operations is a factory which formerly made locks and safes, before its conversion to production of guns and gun mounts. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Sixteen years as an auto mechanic, this worker now assembles thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts in a factory which formerly made safes and locks for civilian use. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Production. Naval gun mounts. Part of a 16 inch naval gun assembly is ground for surface finish in a large Midwest factory producing mounts for big naval guns and torpedo tubes. Westinghouse, Louisville, Kentucky

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling the weapons of democracy. In a factory which formerly manufactured safes and locks, today thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts are coming off the assembly line. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling the weapons of democracy. In a factory which formerly manufactured safes and locks, today thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts are coming off the assembly line. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Tin can alley leads to victory. Save that tin can! Uncle Sam needs it. As vital as iron and steel to the war effort, reclaimed tin is used to make the bushings of airplane motors and machine-gun mounts, and for other war equipment. First step in preparing cans for your government is to remove both ends (or leave attached by no more than one-half inch).

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling weapons for Victory to be used by the armed forces. Gerald Smith, twenty-eight, assembles thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts in a factory which formerly made safes and locks. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Women arc welders discuss the production of motor mounts and welded parts in a welding booth at the Inglewood, California, plant of North American Aviation, Incorporated. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. Naval gun mounts. The gear drive of a naval gun mount is carefully assembled and fitted in a large Midwest plant, which is also producing torpedo tube mounts. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Naval gun mounts. The chassis of a large naval gun mount nears completion as workmen of a Midwest machine shop perform final scraping and fitting operations. Westinghouse, Louisville

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Millimeter guns for America's armed forces are assembled in a factory once devoted to manufacture of safes and locks. These are breech ring mounts for the guns. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. This man and the factory he works in were both accustomed to a different kind of work in times of peace. A former silk weaver and loom repairman, this worker now assembles thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts in a plant which made safe and locks before Pearl Harbor. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Floor waxer plant. He used to be a weaver and repair man for looms, but he's one of Uncle Sam's defense workers now. Employed by a small Eastern floor waxer manufacturing firm, this worker now spends ninty-nine percent of his time working on small parts for gun mounts. Floorola Products Inc., York, Pennsylvania

Production. Naval gun mounts. A naval gun mount assembly, one of many produced in a Midwest plant, is carefully inspected before shipment to an undisclosed destination. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Naval gun mounts. A naval gun mount assembly, one of many produced in a Midwest plant, is carefully inspected before shipment to an undisclosed destination. Westinghouse, Louisville, Kentucky

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling the weapons of democracy. In a factory which formerly manufactured safes and locks, today thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts are coming off the assembly line. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Assembling the weapons of democracy. In a factory which formerly manufactured safes and locks, today thirty-seven-millimeter guns and gun mounts are coming off the assembly line. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

War production drive. "Bomb Tokyo with More Mounts." This unusual display, sponsored by the labor-mangagement committee in the Lamp Division of Westinghouse, was highly effective in the war production drive. As each section increased its production, its bomb was moved nearer the cowering Jap and departments raced to get their bombs in first

Production. Torpedo tube mounts. Front pieces of torpedo tubes are drilled for assembly in a Midwest plant producing great numbers of mounts for torpedo tubes and large naval guns. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Torpedo tube mounts. A torpedo tube mount in the final assembly stage at a Midwest machine shop engaged in volume production of mounts for torpedo tubes and large naval guns. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Naval gun mounts. Part of a 16 inch naval gun assembly is ground for surface finish in a large Midwest factory producing mounts for big naval guns and torpedo tubes. Westinghouse, Louisville, Kentucky

Production. Naval gun mounts. A large casting for a naval gun mount goes through a planing operation in a Midwest plant which is producing gun and torpedo tube mounts in great numbers. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Naval gun mounts. Rough-cutting a steel plate for naval gun mounts. The acetylene flame-cutting methods of a large Midwest plant are a substantial help in keeping production at a high level. Westinghouse, Louisville

Production. Naval gun mounts. Getting pinions on a naval gun mount assembly. The large Midwest plant producing these mounts in great quantities is also making many torpedo tube mounts. Westinghouse, Louisville

Conversion. Safe and lock company. Ex-auto mechanic pictured at work in ex-lock factory. Merril Darr, twenty-five, works on breech ring for a thirty-seven-millimeter gun. These guns and thirty-seven-millimeter gun mounts are now produced in a plant which formerly manufactured items for civilian use. York Safe and Lock Company, York, Pennsylvania

Fort Knox. Machine guns. The .30 caliber machine gun is one of the standard tools of our Army today. It is used on a variety of mounts to serve a number of military purposes

Gorham (vicinity), New Hampshire. Barbara Mortensen, a fire and airplane lookout on Pine Mountain, mounts fifty-six steps to reach the fire tower

Detroit, Michigan. Tightening chains holding gun mounts to floor of a truck

Moreno Valley, Colfax County, New Mexico. Daughters of George Mutz, a second generation cattle rancher, "saddling up" their mounts

Detroit, Michigan. Gun mounts loaded on a truck