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A ground-to-air view of the space shuttle Challenger during liftoff from launch complex 39A at 7:33 a.m. EDT. Aboard the Challenger for the seventh launch of the Space Transportation System are CMDR Bob Crippen, pilot Frederick H. Hauck, and mission specialists Sally Ride, John M. Fabian and Dr. Norman Thagard

The space shuttle orbiter Challenger lifts off from Complex 39A at 7:33 a.m. EDT. Aboard the seventh flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-7) are: Bob Crippen, commander; Frederick H. Hauck, pilot; and mission specialists Sally Ride, John Fabian and Dr. Norman Thagard

Marine Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Dave Hilmers, left, and Mike Lounge, mission specialists on the space shuttle orbiter Discovery's latest flight, share a joke in front of the crowd assembled to welcome them and the rest of the Discovery crew back to Earth

41C-14-500 - STS-41C - Mission specialists on aft flight deck

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston, Texas -- -- STS065(S)002 -- STS-65 Official Crew Portrait --- Six NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist take a break from STS-65 training to pose for their crew portrait. Left to right are Richard J. Hieb, Leroy Chiao, James D. Halsell Jr., Robert D. Cabana, Dr. Chiaki Mukai, Donald A. Thomas and Carl E. Walz. Cabana is mission commander, and Halsell has been assigned as pilot. Hieb is payload commander, with Walz, Thomas and Chiao serving as mission specialists. Dr. Mukai represents the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan as payload specialist on the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML) mission. KSC-94PC-611

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- (JSC STS109-5-002) -- STS-109 CREW PORTRAIT -- Seven astronauts take a break from training for the STS-109 mission to pose for the traditional pre-flight crew portrait. From the left are astronauts Michael J. Massimino, Richard M. Linnehan, Duane G. Carey, Scott D. Altman, Nancy J. Currie, John M. Grunsfeld and James H. Newman. Altman and Carey are commander and pilot, respectively, with the others serving as mission specialists. Grunsfeld is payload commander. The group will be the fourth to visit the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for performing upgrade and servicing on the giant orbital observatory KSC-01pp1823

S82E5287 - STS-082 - Mission Specialists in Airlock

S82E5290 - STS-082 - Mission Specialists in Airlock

S82E5288 - STS-082 - Mission Specialists in Airlock

S82E5291 - STS-082 - Mission Specialists in Airlock

S82E5289 - STS-082 - Mission Specialists in Airlock

S82E5286 - STS-082 - Mission Specialists help crewmembers into EMUs

Mission Specialists in Airlock

STS-84 mission specialists and SPACEHAB workers participate in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) inside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and logistics to the Russian Space Station Mir. Standing at left is JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Sitting on the floor, from left, are Edward Tsang Lu of NASA and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The test is being conducted at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with Mir. It also will be the third consecutive crew member exchange of U.S. astronauts aboard Mir. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will replace astronaut Jerry M. Linenger on Mir. Linenger has been on Mir since the STS-81 mission in January. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc500

STS-84 Mission Specialists, from left, C. Michael Foale, Edward Tsang Lu and Elena V. Kondakova practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other four members of the STS-84 crew are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc749

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, David A. Wolf, and Wendy B. Lawrence, at right, participate in emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are the three U.S. astronauts who will serve as mission specialists during the planned 10-day flight to the Russian Space Station Mir. Also serving as mission specialists will be Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1358

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists (and their nicknames for this flight) are, from left, "too tall" Scott E. Parazynski, "just right" David A. Wolf and "too short" Wendy B. Lawrence. The two mission specialists representing foreign space agencies are Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, in foreground at right, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, in background at right. Commander James D. Wetherbee and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield are out of the frame. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. Parazynski and Lawrence were withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir Parazynski because he was too tall to fit safely in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, and Lawrence because she was too short to fit into a Russian spacewalk suit. The crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the planned 10-day mission KSC-97PC1428

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbox that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their flight. Talking to Ross is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, while Henry Thacker (facing camera), of Flight Crew Systems at KSC, looks on. Launch of mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1215

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbox that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their flight. Talking to Ross is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, while Henry Thacker (facing camera), of Flight Crew Systems at KSC, looks on. Launch of mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1215
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbox that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their flight. Talking to Ross is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, while Henry Thacker (facing camera), of Flight Crew Systems at KSC, looks on. Launch of mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1215

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists (left to right) Jerry L. Ross; Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; and James H. Newman examine equipment that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their upcoming flight. Launch of Mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Other crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1213

STS088-S-005 (4 Dec. 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 3:35:34 a.m. (EST), December 4, 1998, from Launch Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Onboard were astronauts Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, along with Russian Space Agency (RSA) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, all mission specialists. sts088-s-005

STS088-S-008 (4 Dec. 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 3:35:34 a.m. (EST), December 4, 1998, from Launch Pad 39A, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Onboard were astronauts Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, along with Russian Space Agency (RSA) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, all mission specialists. sts088-s-008

STS088-S-006 (4 Dec. 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 3:35:34 a.m. (EST), December 4, 1998, from Launch Pad 39A, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Onboard were astronauts Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot; Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, along with Russian Space Agency (RSA) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, all mission specialists. sts088-s-006

STS044-44-014 - STS-044 - Views of the Mission Specialists' seats on OV-104's middeck

STS044-44-016 - STS-044 - View of the Mission Specialists' seats on OV-104's middeck

STS044-44-015 - STS-044 - Views of the Mission Specialists' seats on OV-104's middeck

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialists (left) Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tamara Jernigan, Ph.D., look over the foot restraint used during space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B KSC-99pp0315

STS-96 Mission Specialists (left to right) Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Julie Payette and Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) wait in the slidewire basket at Launch Pad 39B to practice emergency egress procedures before a launch. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.) and Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.). Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment KSC-99pp0474

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Discovery drops out of the darkness onto runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling more than 3,267,000 miles on a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronauts Curtis L. Brown Jr., Commander; Scott J. Kelly, Pilot; and Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, all Mission Specialists, spent the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 p.m. EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 p.m. EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history KSC-99pp1504

STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly holds his daughter as he talks to Mission Specialists and fellow crew members Jean-François Clervoy of France and Steven L. Smith on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. The STS-103 mission supplied the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, and a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery KSC-99pp1516

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft, STS-99 Mission Specialists (from left) Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are greeted by Dave King, director of Shuttle Operations. Behind Mohri can be seen Commander Kevin Kregel and Mission Specialist Janice Voss. The crew, which includes Pilot Dom gorie and Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, are ready to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0171

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft, STS-99 Mission Specialists (from left) Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are greeted by Dave King, director of Shuttle Operations. Behind Mohri can be seen Commander Kevin Kregel and Mission Specialist Janice Voss. The crew, which includes Pilot Dom gorie and Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, are ready to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0171

The STS-101 crew walk from the Operations and Checkout Building to the Astrovan, which will take them to Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown exercise. Leading the way are (left) Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz and (right) Commander James D. Halsell Jr. In the second row are Mission Specialists (left) Mary Ellen Weber and (right) Jeffrey N. Williams. In the third row are Mission Specialists (left) James Voss, (waving) Susan J. Helms, and (right) Yury Usachev of Russia. The dress rehearsal for launch is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that include emergency egress training and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0459

The STS-101 crew wave at onlookers as they walk from the Operations and Checkout Building to the Astrovan, which will take them to Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown exercise. Leading the way are (left) Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz and (right) Commander James D. Halsell Jr. In the second row are Mission Specialists (left) Mary Ellen Weber and (right) Jeffrey N. Williams. In the third row are Mission Specialists (left) James Voss, (waving) Susan J. Helms, and (right) Yury Usachev of Russia. The dress rehearsal for launch is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that include emergency egress training and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0460

While suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-101 Mission Specialists (standing) Susan J. Helms, James S. Voss and (sitting) Yuri Usachev of Russia reveal their happiness to be just hours away from launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station KSC-00pp0562

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-106 Mission Specialists stand in a slide wire basket at the foot of Launch Pad 39-B. Pictured from left are Daniel C. Burbank, Boris V. Morukov and Yuri I. Malenchenko. Malenchenko and Morukov are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. The flight crew were at Kennedy Space Center to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training and opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC-00pp1175

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-106 Mission Specialists (left to right) Boris V. Morukov, Daniel C. Burbank and Yuri I. Malenchenko take their seats in the slidewire basket, which is part of the emergency egress equipment. They and the rest of the STS-106 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT), which includes emergency egress training, along with opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay, and a simulated launch countdown. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC00pp1180

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-106 Mission Specialists (left to right) Richard A. Mastracchio and Edward T. Lu pause for a photo before taking their seats in the slidewire basket, which is part of the emergency egress equipment. They and the rest of the STS-106 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT), which includes emergency egress training, along with opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay, and a simulated launch countdown. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC-00pp1184

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-106 Mission Specialists (left to right) Richard A. Mastracchio and Edward T. Lu pause for a photo before taking their seats in the slidewire basket, which is part of the emergency egress equipment. They and the rest of the STS-106 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT), which includes emergency egress training, along with opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay, and a simulated launch countdown. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC00pp1184

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-106 Mission Specialists stand in a slide wire basket at the foot of Launch Pad 39-B. Pictured from left are Daniel C. Burbank, Boris V. Morukov and Yuri I. Malenchenko. Malenchenko and Morukov are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. The flight crew were at Kennedy Space Center to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training and opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC00pp1175

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-106 Mission Specialists (left to right) Boris V. Morukov, Daniel C. Burbank and Yuri I. Malenchenko pause for a photo before taking their seats in the slidewire basket, which is part of the emergency egress equipment. They and the rest of the STS-106 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT), which includes emergency egress training, along with opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay, and a simulated launch countdown. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC00pp1183

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-106 Mission Specialists (left to right) Boris V. Morukov, Daniel C. Burbank and Yuri I. Malenchenko take their seats in the slidewire basket, which is part of the emergency egress equipment. They and the rest of the STS-106 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT), which includes emergency egress training, along with opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay, and a simulated launch countdown. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC-00pp1180

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-106 Mission Specialists (left to right) Boris V. Morukov, Daniel C. Burbank and Yuri I. Malenchenko pause for a photo before taking their seats in the slidewire basket, which is part of the emergency egress equipment. They and the rest of the STS-106 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT), which includes emergency egress training, along with opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter’s payload bay, and a simulated launch countdown. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:31 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC-00pp1183

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialists (left to right) Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff, Leroy Chiao, Koichi Wakata of Japan and William S. McArthur Jr. finish emergency egress training in the slidewire baskets behind them. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1381

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialists (left to right) Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff, Leroy Chiao, Koichi Wakata of Japan and William S. McArthur Jr. finish emergency egress training in the slidewire baskets behind them. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC00pp1381

A smiling Thomas Jones, one of the mission specialists on STS-98, gets ready to take the driver’s seat in an M-113 armored carrier, part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-98 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also includes a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS KSC01pp0030

At the slidewire basket landing near Launch Pad 39B, the Expedition Two crew poses for a photograph. From left to right are Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss. They are flying on Space Shuttle Discovery (seen in the background) as mission specialists for STS-102, joining Commander James Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly and Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards for the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station. Voss, Helms and Usachev will be replacing the Expedition One crew, who will return to Earth with Discovery. STS-102 will be carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8 KSC-01pp0320

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-102 Mission Specialists (left to right) Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss happily greet the media. They are also the Expedition Two crew replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. STS-102 will be carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST KSC-01pp0403

STS-102 Mission Specialists, Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss pose after suitup. Voss and Helms are making their fifth Shuttle flights and Usachev is making his second. All three are the Expedition Two crew who are replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. . The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. Discovery is set to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST. The 12-day mission is expected to end with a landing at KSC on March 20 KSC01pp0426

JSC2001-E-19296 (25 June 2001) --- Astronauts James F. Reilly (left), Janet L. Kavandi, Michael L. Gernhardt, all STS-104 mission specialists; along with Charles O. Hobaugh and Steven W. Lindsey, pilot and mission commander, respectively, are photographed during a pre-flight press conference at Johnson Space Center (JSC). JSC2001E19296

JSC2002-00514 (February 2002)--- The STS-109 flight crew poses with the ascent and entry shift team in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center. Flight Director John Shannon holds the mission insignia. Members of the flight crew are astronauts Scott D. Altman, commander; Duane G. Carey, pilot; John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander; and James H. Newman, Nancy J. Currie, Richard M. Linnehan and Michael J. Massimino, all mission specialists. Currie stands to the right of the logo, followed by, left to right, Altman, Grunsfeld, Newman and Massimino. Linnehan and Carey are not pictured. JSC2002-00514

JSC2002-00405 (4 February 2002) --- Astronauts Philippe Perrin (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, both STS-111 mission specialists attired in training versions of the shuttle launch and entry garment, await the start of a training session at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near the Johnson Space Center (JSC). STS-111 will be the 14th shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS). jsc2002-00405

JSC2002-E-05104 (15 February 2002) --- The STS-109 crewmembers are photographed during a pre-flight press conference at Johnson Space Center (JSC). From the left are astronauts Michael J. Massimino, James H. Newman, Richard M. Linnehan, John M. Grunsfeld, Nancy J. Currie, Duane G. Carey, and Scott D. Altman. Altman and Carey are mission commander and pilot, respectively. Grunsfeld is payload commander and Currie, Linnehan, Newman and Massimino are mission specialists. jsc2002e05104

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TX -- (JSC STS111-5-002) -- These four astronauts are the prime crew for NASA's STS-111 mission. Astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell (front right) is mission commander, and astronaut Paul S. Lockhart (front left) is pilot. Astronauts Philippe Perrin (rear left), representing the French Space Agency, and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz are mission specialists, assigned to extravehicular activity (EVA) work on the International Space Station (ISS). Additionally, this crew will drop off the Expedition Five crew members at the orbital outpost, and it will bring back the Expedition Four trio at mission's end KSC-02pd0633

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- (STS112-S-002) These five astronauts and cosmonaut take a break from training to pose for the STS-112 crew portrait. Astronauts Pamela A. Melroy and Jeffrey S. Ashby, pilot and commander respectively, are in the center of the photo. The mission specialists are from left to right, astronauts Sandra H. Magnus, David A. Wolf and Piers J. Sellers, and cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, who represents Rosaviakosmos. KSC-02pd1155

STS111-S-007 (5 June 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off, creating billows of smoke and steam on its way into space for mission STS-111 to the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 5:22:49 p.m. (EDT), June 5, 2002. The STS-111 crew includes astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin, mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition Five crew members including cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, commander, along with astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Perrin represents CNES, the French space agency, and Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos). This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. sts111-s-007

STS111-S-005 (5 June 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off, creating billows of smoke and steam on its way into space for mission STS-111 to the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 5:22:49 p.m. (EDT), June 5, 2002. The STS-111 crew includes astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin, mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition Five crewmembers including cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, commander, along with astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Perrin represents CNES, the French space agency, and Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos). This mission marks the 14th shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. sts111-s-005

JSC2002-E-34634 (16 August 2002) --- Cosmonaut Fyodor N. Yurchikhin (left) and astronaut Piers J. Sellers, both STS-112 mission specialists, participate in a review of mission hardware during a training session at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Yurchikhin represents Rosaviakosmos. jsc2002e34634

STS112-S-005 (7 October 2002) --- An automated camera records the launch of mission STS-112, the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B occurred at 3:46 p.m. (EDT), October 7, 2002. Atlantis carried the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks were successful in attaching the S1 truss to the Station and performing other scheduled ISS work. The STS-112 crew members of Atlantis are Jeffrey S. Ashby, commander; Pamela A. Melroy, pilot; and David A. Wolf, Piers J. Sellers, Sandra H. Magnus and Rosaviakosmos' Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, all mission specialists. sts112-s-005

STS112-S-014 (7 October 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis shoots through the clear blue sky after launch on mission STS-112, the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B occurred at 3:46 p.m. (EDT), October 7, 2002.. Atlantis carried the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks were successful in attaching the S1 truss to the Station and performing other scheduled ISS work. The STS-112 crew members of Atlantis are Jeffrey S. Ashby, commander; Pamela A. Melroy, pilot; and David A. Wolf, Piers J. Sellers, Sandra H. Magnus and Rosaviakosmos' Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, all mission specialists. sts112-s-014

STS112-S-028 (18 October 2002) --- The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Atlantis is seconds away from touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey that included a week of work with the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. (EDT), October 18, 2002; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The STS-112 crew members of Atlantis are Jeffrey S. Ashby, commander; Pamela A. Melroy, pilot; and David A. Wolf, Piers J. Sellers, Sandra H. Magnus and Rosaviakosmos' Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, all mission specialists. sts112-s-028

STS112-S-024 (18 October 2002) --- Space Shuttle Atlantis kicks up dust as it touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey that included a week of work with the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. (EDT), October 18, 2002; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The STS-112 crew members of Atlantis are Jeffrey S. Ashby, commander; Pamela A. Melroy, pilot; and David A. Wolf, Piers J. Sellers, Sandra H. Magnus and Rosaviakosmos' Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, all mission specialists. sts112-s-024

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Specialist Charles Camarda is helped by the Closeout Crew with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. This is Camarda’s first Shuttle flight. The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1794

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Pilot James Kelly is helped by the Closeout Crew with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Discovery.The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1795

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the wrong place at the wrong time, a bird (upper left) falls away from Space Shuttle Discovery after being hit by the External Tank during launch from Launch Pad 39B. Discovery lifted off into the clear blue sky at 10:39 a.m. EDT on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. It is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1774

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fish-eye view shows Space Shuttle Discovery moments after liftoff from Launch Pad 39B on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. At left is the Fixed Service Structure with the White Room appearing to be suspended in mid-air. The White Room provides the astronauts access into the orbiter. The liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. KSC-05pp1772

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Framed by Florida greenery, Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off Launch Pad 39B at 10:39 a.m. EDT on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. It is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1770

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Discovery is seen just moments after liftoff as it leaps from Launch Pad 39B on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. Liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. It is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1776

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Commander Eileen Collins is helped by the Closeout Crew with her launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1793

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas is helped by the Closeout Crew with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1796

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence is helped with her launch and entry suit by the Closeout Crew before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1798

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - As billows of smoke and steam roll away, Space Shuttle Discovery leaps from Launch Pad 39B on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. Liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. At right is the 290-foot water tower that holds the 300,000 gallons of water that flood the pad for sound suppression. This is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1778

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds of smoke and steam fill Launch Pad 39B as Space Shuttle Discovery roars into the sky on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. Liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. It is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1773

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi is helped by the Closeout Crew with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. This is Noguchi’s first Shuttle flight. He represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1797

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson is helped by the Closeout Crew with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. The Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station carries the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, housing 15 tons of hardware and supplies that will be transferred to the Station after the Shuttle docks to the complex . On this mission, the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. KSC-05pp1799

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from a camera in the midst of Florida greenery across the marshy water, Space Shuttle Discovery leaps through billows of smoke and steam on Launch Pad 39B on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. Liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. This is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1779

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds of smoke and steam roll away from Launch Pad 39B as Space Shuttle Discovery roars above the tree line into the sky. Liftoff of Discovery on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. (Photo Credit: Bill Ingalls) KSC-05pp1768

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The flames of Space Shuttle Discovery’s Solid Rocket Boosters are reflected in the water next to Launch Pad 39B as the Shuttle leaps from the pad on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. Liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. It is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1777

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds of smoke and steam billow around Space Shuttle Discovery as it leaps off Launch Pad 39B on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. Liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. It is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 31st for Discovery. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. KSC-05pp1775

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds of smoke and steam roll away from Launch Pad 39B as Space Shuttle Discovery roars into the sky. Liftoff of Discovery on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. KSC-05pp1767

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A tracking camera on Launch Pad 39B captures a closeup of Space Shuttle Discovery moments after liftoff on the historic Return to Flight mission STS-114. The liftoff occurred at 10:39 a.m. EDT. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. KSC-05pp1771

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, TX - STS115-S-002 (November 8, 2002) -- These six astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-115 crew portrait. Astronauts Brent W. Jett Jr. (right) and Christopher J. Ferguson, command and pilot respectively, flank the mission insignia. The mission specialists are, from left to right, astronauts Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Joseph R. (Joe) Tanner, Daniel C. Burbank, and Steven G. MacLean, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. KSC-06pd0637

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During emergency egress training at the pad, STS-121 crew members Piers Sellers, Stephanie Wilson and Thomas Reiter, all mission specialists, learn how to exit the slidewire basket on the ground. The crew is at Kennedy for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, including emergency egress training from the pad. They will also suit up in their orange flight suits for a simulated countdown to launch. Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1066

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 Mission Specialists (foreground, from left) Daniel Burbank, Joseph Tanner, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, and Steve Maclean are fit checking a sequential shunt unit, electronics control unit and multiplexer de-multiplexer launch to activation multi-layer installation blankets in a large Orbital Replaceable Unit transfer bag. They and other crew members are at the center for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations. The mission will deliver the second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss, to attach to the first port truss segment, the P1 Truss, as well as deploy solar array set 2A and 4A. Launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1183

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 crew members inspect equipment in Atlantis's payload bay. Mission Specialists (starting second from left) Daniel Burbank and Steven MacLean look at the orbiter boom sensor system. The crew is at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which involves equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations. The STS-115 mission will deliver the second port truss segment, the P3/P4 truss, to the International Space Station. The crew will attach the P3 to the first port truss segment, the P1 truss, as well as deploy solar array set 2A and 4A. Launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1216

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 crew members inspect equipment in Atlantis's payload bay. Mission Specialists (at left) Joseph Tanner and (at right) Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper look at the airlock. The crew is at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which involves equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations. The STS-115 mission will deliver the second port truss segment, the P3/P4 truss, to the International Space Station. The crew will attach the P3 to the first port truss segment, the P1 truss, as well as deploy solar array set 2A and 4A. Launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1209

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Waving flags for the Fourth of July, the STS-121 crew heads for the Astrovan and the ride to Launch Pad 39B for a third launch attempt. Leading the way are Pilot Mark Kelly (left) and Commander Steven Lindsey (right). Behind them are, left and right, Mission Specialists (second row) Lisa Nowak and Michael Fossum; (third row) Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers; and (at the rear) Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The July 2 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the presence of showers and thunderstorms within the surrounding area of the launch site. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1405

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-121 crew displays the spirit of the Fourth of July holiday with their flags and their eagerness to launch as they stride out of the Operations and Checkout Building. Leading the way are Pilot Mark Kelly (left) and Commander Steven Lindsey (right). Behind them are Mission Specialists (second row) Lisa Nowak and Michael Fossum; (third row) Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers; and (at the rear) Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The July 2 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the presence of showers and thunderstorms within the surrounding area of the launch site. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1404

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS117-S-002 -- These six astronauts take a break from traiing to pose for the STS-117 crew portrait. Scheduled to launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis are (from the left) astronauts James F. Reilly II and Steven R. Swanson, mission specialists; Frederick W. (Rick) Sturckow, commander; Lee J. Archambault, pilot; Patrick G. Forrester and John D. (Danny) Olivas, mission specialists. The crew members are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. KSC-07pd0108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral, Fla., STS-116 Mission Specialists (from left) Joan Higginbotham, Sunita Williams and Nicholas Patrick look over flight hardware during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2304

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral, Fla., STS-116 Mission Specialists (from left) Sunita Williams, Joan Higginbotham and Nicholas Patrick look over flight hardware during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral, Fla., STS-116 Mission Specialists (from left) Sunita Williams, Joan Higginbotham and Nicholas Patrick look over flight hardware during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral, Fla., STS-116 Mission Specialists (from left) Joan Higginbotham, Sunita Williams and Nicholas Patrick look over flight hardware during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2305

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Striding through the Vehicle Assembly Building are STS-116 crew members (from left) Mark Polansky, commander; Nicholas Patrick, Sunita Williams, Christer Fugelsang and Joan Higginbotham, mission specialists. The crew is at KSC for a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Kennedy Space Center to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2339

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialists (left) Patrick Forrester, Steven Swanson and (right) James Reilly take a close look at the wheel well on orbiter Atlantis, their vehicle for the mission. They and other crew members are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test that allows them opportunities to become familiar with equipment and hardware for their mission. STS-117 will deliver the S3/S4 and another pair of solar arrays to the space station. The 21st shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-117 is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 16. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2826

These seven astronauts took a break from training to pose for the STS-120 crew portrait. Pictured from the left are astronauts Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; George D. Zamka, pilot; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). The crew members were attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. Tani joined Expedition 16 as flight engineer after launching to the International Space Station (ISS) and is scheduled to return home on mission STS-122. STS-120 launched October 23, 2007 with the main objectives of installing the U.S. Node 2, Harmony, and the relocation and deployment of the P6 truss to its permanent location. n/a

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston, Texas -- STS120-S-002 -- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-120 crew portrait. Pictured from the left are astronauts Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; George D. Zamka, pilot; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 15 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. Tani is scheduled to join Expedition 15 as flight engineer after launching to the International Space Station on mission STS-120 and is scheduled to return home on mission STS-122. KSC-07pd2383

JSC2007-E-18080 (9 April 2007) --- Attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits, astronauts Stephanie D. Wilson (left) and Douglas H. Wheelock, both STS-120 mission specialists, exchange thoughts as they participate in a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center. jsc2007e18080

JSC2007-E-18090 (9 April 2007) --- Attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits, the STS-120 crewmembers await the start of a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center. From the left are astronauts Pamela A. Melroy, STS-120 commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; George D. Zamka, STS-120 pilot; Douglas H. Wheelock, Scott E. Parazynski, Stephanie D. Wilson and European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, all mission specialists. Tani is scheduled to join Expedition 16 as flight engineer after launching to the International Space Station on mission STS-120 and is scheduled to return home on mission STS-122. jsc2007e18090

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS122-S-002 -- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-122 crew portrait. From the left (front row) are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, commander; the European Space Agency's, or ESA's, Leopold Eyharts; and Alan G. Poindexter, pilot. From the left (back row) are astronauts Leland D. Melvin, Rex J. Walheim, Stanley G. Love and ESA's Hans Schlegel, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the International Space Station. The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. KSC-07pd3279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS117-S-002 (May 2007) --- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-117 crew portrait. Scheduled to launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis are (from the left) astronauts Clayton C. Anderson, James F. Reilly II, Steven R. Swanson, mission specialists; Frederick W. (Rick) Sturckow, commander; Lee J. Archambault, pilot; Patrick G. Forrester and John D. (Danny) Olivas, mission specialists. Anderson will join Expedition 15 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the International Space Station. The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. KSC-07pd1262