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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1157

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members manipulate the cover on the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Seen here are Mission Specialist Rex Walheim (left) and Commander Steve Frick (right). The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0063

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. Seen here is Commander Steve Frick. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. In the foreground are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim (left) and Stan Love. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0062

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members manipulate the cover on the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Seen here is (left) Mission Specialist Stan Love.. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. Other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0065

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. Here, Mission Specialist Rex Walheim closely examines a component of the laboratory. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0059

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Columbus European Laboratory, part of the payload on their mission. Seen here is Commander Steve Frick. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stan Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND). Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0057

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look at the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Seen here in the foreground are Mission Specialists Stan Love (left) and Rex Walheim. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0064

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members inspect the Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure - Non-Deployable (MPESS-ND), part of the payload on their mission. Here, Mission Specialist Stan Love (left) and Commander Steve Frick get a close look. The crew is participating in a crew equipment interface test that provides opportunities for hands-on experience with payloads and equipment. The other crew members are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The 24th mission to the International Space Station, STS-122 will also include the Columbus European Laboratory. Launch of STS-122 on Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled no earlier than October. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0061

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS122-S-002 -- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-122 crew portrait. From the left (front row) are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, commander; the European Space Agency's, or ESA's, Leopold Eyharts; and Alan G. Poindexter, pilot. From the left (back row) are astronauts Leland D. Melvin, Rex J. Walheim, Stanley G. Love and ESA's Hans Schlegel, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the International Space Station. The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. KSC-07pd3279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Stanley Love looks at the experiment racks inside the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. He and other crew members are at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2604

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin gets a close look at the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2602

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-122 crew look over the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2600

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Rex Walheim points at part of the Columbus Research Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. He and other crew members are at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2603

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission. Holding the camera at left is Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel. Next to him, from left, are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim and Stanley Love. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2642

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission. With the camera is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin. At left is Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2641

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members practice working with equipment for the mission. From left are Commander Stephen Frick and Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Leland Melvin (behind), Rex Walheim and Stanley Love. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2651

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look at some of the equipment for the mission. From left, in the foreground, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Rex Walheim and Pilot Alan Poindexter. In the background at left is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; at right is European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who will be on the mission and joining the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2653

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2660

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members take a ride inside space shuttle Atlantis' payload bay to examine components installed there. Seen here are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin (center) and Rex Walheim (right). The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2656

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2658

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From a lower level in the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew check out the landing gear on space shuttle Atlantis, overhead. Dressed in their blue suits are Mission Specialist Leland Melvin, Commander Stephen Frick, European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space Station to join the Expedition 16 crew as a flight engineer. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2611

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members take a ride inside space shuttle Atlantis' payload bay to examine components installed there. Seen here are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin (center) and Rex Walheim (right). The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2655

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission. In the foreground is Mission Specialist Stanley Love. Behind him at left is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; at right is Pilot Alan Poindexter. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2639

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members stand next to the space shuttle Atlantis, which is being processed for launch on STS-122. From left are European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who also represents ESA. Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space Station to join the Expedition 16 crew as a flight engineer. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2614

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members take a ride inside space shuttle Atlantis' payload bay to examine components installed there. Seen here are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin (center) and Rex Walheim (right). The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2654

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency. A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab, a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2659

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Commander Steve Frick, at the microphone, addresses the media at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility following his arrival to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. Other STS-122 crew members are, from left, Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, a European Space Agency astronaut who will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16; Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3326

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. STS-122 Launch Director Doug Lyons greets Pilot Alan Poindexter as Commander Steve Frick looks on. Disembarking are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency and Stanley Love. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3324

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin talks to the media at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility following his arrival to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3328

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. STS-122 Launch Director Doug Lyons greets Mission Specialist Leland Melvin as Commander Steve Frick and Pilot Alan Poindexter look on. Disembarking are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts, a European Space Agency astronaut who will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3325

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. From left are Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, a European Space Agency astronaut who will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16; Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3333

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-122 crew receive a briefing inside an M-113 armored personnel carrier near Launch Pad 39B. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the pad before their launch. Seated on the bench at left is European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, the backup for STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts. Seated on the bench at right, from back to front are Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3335

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, members of the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew pose for a photo in front of the Columbus module during terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. Columbus was installed in the orbiter's payload bay on Nov. 11. From left, in clean room attire, are Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; former astronaut Jerry Ross, kneeling, chief of the Vehicle Integration Test Office at NASA Johnson Space Center; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialist Stanley Love. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The module is approximately 23 feet long and 15 feet wide, allowing it to hold 10 large racks of experiments. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3355

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait near Launch Pad 39B during a training session on the operation of the M-113 armored personnel carrier. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the pad before their launch. From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leopold Eyharts and Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Stanley Love; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialist Leland Melvin. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3334

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin, at right, practices driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as the instructor beside him monitors his performance. STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter, at left, rides in back. The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3341

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency, in front, practices driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as the instructor, in the helmet beside him, monitors his performance. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. In back from left, former astronaut Jerry Ross, chief of the Vehicle Integration Test Office at NASA Johnson Space Center, and STS-122 Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love (standing) and Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, are along for the ride. The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3350

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin tries on his launch and entry suit, preparing for launch. The fitting is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities the crew is undertaking at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3358

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin takes time out from driving practice of the M-113 armored personnel carrier to pose for a photo. The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3340

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin tries on the gloves of his launch and entry suit, preparing for launch. The fitting is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities the crew is undertaking at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3359

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait near Launch Pad 39B following a training session on the operation of the M-113 armored personnel carrier. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the pad before their launch. From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Stanley Love; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Leopold Eyharts and Hans Schlegel. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3351

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group photo following a press conference. From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3380

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gathered in the white room on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew members listen to an instructor explain space shuttle emergency exit procedures. From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, Leland Melvin and Leopold Eyharts. Pilot Alan Poindexter and Commander Steve Frick are standing behind them. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3382

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gathered in the white room on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew pauses for a photo. Standing, from left, are Pilot Alan Poindexter, Commander Steve Frick and Mission Specialist Leland Melvin. Kneeling, center, is Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel. In the bottom row, from left, are Stanley Love, Rex Walheim and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3381

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A. Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, from left, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; astronaut Frank De Winne of the European Space Agency, backup for Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Leopold Eyharts; Mission Specialist Stanley Love; and Commander Steve Frick listen intently to their trainer. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A.  Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, from left, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; astronaut Frank De Winne of the European Space Agency, backup for Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Leopold Eyharts; Mission Specialist Stanley Love; and Commander Steve Frick listen intently to their trainer.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3398
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A. Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, from left, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; astronaut Frank De Winne of the European Space Agency, backup for Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Leopold Eyharts; Mission Specialist Stanley Love; and Commander Steve Frick listen intently to their trainer. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. From left, Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin gain first-hand experience inside one of the baskets. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3394

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Seen here near the catch nets in the landing zone are, from left, Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim; Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3392

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Seen here near the catch nets in the landing zone are, from left, Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim; Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3392
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Seen here near the catch nets in the landing zone are, from left, Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim; Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3392

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3387

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Standing, from left, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; and Pilot Alan Poindexter.  Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.    The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3387
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3387

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick, with his back to the camera. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3386

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick, with his back to the camera. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.    The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3386
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick, with his back to the camera. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3386

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media. From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim (with the microphone), Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3378

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a training session on emergency exit from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A, space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Commander Steve Frick, left, and Mission Specialist Leland Melvin watch a slidewire basket descend to the landing zone. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3391

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Here, Mission Specialist Rex Walheim practices getting out of one of the baskets as Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin steady it. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Here, Mission Specialist Rex Walheim practices getting out of one of the baskets as Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin steady it.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3395
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Here, Mission Specialist Rex Walheim practices getting out of one of the baskets as Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin steady it. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media. From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel (with the microphone), Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3379

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin takes part in a press conference at the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3375

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim. Schlegel is with the European Space Agency. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3388

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim.  Schlegel is with the European Space Agency.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3388
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim. Schlegel is with the European Space Agency. Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed. Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute. A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3388

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media. From left are Commander Steve Frick (with the microphone); Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3372

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait at Launch Pad 39A as Atlantis undergoes final preparations for launch behind them. From left are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; Commander Steve Frick; and Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3371

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on emergency exit from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Clockwise, from left, are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Stanley Love, Eyharts' backup Frank De Winne, Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, Pilot Alan Poindexter, Commander Steve Frick and Mission Specialist Rex Walheim with his back to the camera. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3385

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrives at Launch Pad 39A, dressed in launch and entry suits, to participate in a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3422

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew leaves the Operations and Checkout Building for their trip to Launch Pad 39A aboard the astronaut van. From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3418

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 crew pose for a group portrait with the tip of Atlantis' external tank in the background following a simulated launch countdown at Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love and Hans Schlegel. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3451

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait in front of the astronaut van as they leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3419

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait in front of the astronaut van as they leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A.  From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3419
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait in front of the astronaut van as they leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3419

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin puts on his gloves, part of his launch and entry suit, in astronaut crew quarters. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3404

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A suit technician helps space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin put on his boots, part of his launch and entry suit, in astronaut crew quarters. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 crew pose for a group portrait in front of Atlantis' external tank following a simulated launch countdown at Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love and Hans Schlegel. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3452

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leland Melvin take time out for a photo during their preparations for entry onto Atlantis' flight deck. The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3436

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew exits the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39A. Clockwise, from left front, are Pilot Alan Poindexter; Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3417

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin arrives at Launch Pad 39A, dressed in his launch and entry suit, to participate in a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis. The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3420

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew greet the media and employees on hand to cheer them on as the leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A. Clockwise, from left front, are Pilot Alan Poindexter; Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3416

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew greet the media and employees on hand to cheer them on as the leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A.  Clockwise, from left front, are Pilot Alan Poindexter; Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; and Commander Steve Frick.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3416
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew greet the media and employees on hand to cheer them on as the leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A. Clockwise, from left front, are Pilot Alan Poindexter; Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3416

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin, strapped in his seat on Atlantis' fight deck, signals that he is ready to proceed with the simulated launch countdown. The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3440

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-122 mission crew greet the media on the Shuttle Landing Facility. At the microphone is Commander Steve Frick. Behind him, left to right, are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Eyhars and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122. The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3. Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3512

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin dons his launch and entry suit for a final fitting before space shuttle Atlantis' launch scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6. Melvin will make his first shuttle flight. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3535

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew pose on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after their arrival for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station while Atlantis returns flight engineer Daniel Tani. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122. The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3. Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3520

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After the mission STS-122 crew's arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin is introduced during a media opportunity on the Shuttle Landing Facility. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122. The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3. Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3517

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin tests his gloves for a final fitting before space shuttle Atlantis' launch scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6. Melvin will make his first shuttle flight. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3537

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Bill Parsons welcomes STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter after the mission crew's arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. At right is Commander Steve Frick. Seen behind Poindexter is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122. The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3. Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3510

S122E009918 - STS-122 - Melvin on FD

S122E009795 - STS-122 - Frick and Melvin on FD

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After their arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-122 crew gathers on the Shuttle Landing Facility to talk to the media. At the microphone is Commander Steve Frick. Behind him are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Eyharts and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency.The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0128

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-122 crew arrive for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin. They were greeted by Doug Lyons (left, yellow shirt), launch director for the mission, and Pete Nickolenko (right, green shirt), lead shuttle test director. Eyharts and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0125

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-122 mission specialists disembark from a shuttle training aircraft. From left are Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0123

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-122 crew are greeted by Doug Lyons (left, yellow shirt), launch director for the mission, and Pete Nickolenko (right, green shirt), lead shuttle test director, after their arrival. Crew members from left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0124

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After their arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-122 crew heads for a microphone to greet the media waiting for them. From left are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Eyharts and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0126

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After his arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-122 Mission Specialist Leland Melvin talks to the media about looking forward to a great flight. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0133A

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew members pose on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after their arrival for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency. Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station while Atlantis returns flight engineer Daniel Tani. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission, at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7. This will be the third launch attempt for the mission. Some of the tank's ECO sensors gave failed readings during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9, subsequently scrubbing further attempts until the cause could be found and repairs made. Atlantis will carry the Columbus module, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0134

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the flight deck of space shuttle Atlantis, STS-122 crew members inspect the cables for cameras used on their flight. At left is Leland Melvin and at right is Stanley Love, both mission specialists. The STS-122 mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 2:45 p.m. Feb. 7 with a crew of seven. Atlantis will carry the Columbus Laboratory, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the station. Columbus will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to the Harmony module to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0161

STS122-S-051 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0247

STS122-S-064 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pp0297

STS122-S-046 (7 Feb. 2008) --- Flames from the main engines on Space Shuttle Atlantis, at ignition, pour through the mobile launcher platform into the flame trench below. Within seconds, Atlantis was on its climb into space and a rendezvous with the International Space Station on mission STS-122. Liftoff was on time at 2:45 p.m. (EST). This is the third launch attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0242

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-122 mission crew members stride out of the Operations and Checkout Building, eager to ride to the launch pad and take their seats in space shuttle Atlantis for the planned launch today at 2:45 p.m. EST. Seen on the right, front to back, are Commander Steve Frick and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Hans Schlegel. On the left, front to back, are Pilot Alan Poindexter, followed by Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts represent the European Space Agency. The launch will be the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory to the International Space Station. During the 11-day mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0199

STS122-S-048 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0244

STS122-S-061 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pp0293

STS122-S-054 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pp0286

STS122-S-006 (7 Feb. 2008) --- After suiting up, the STS-122 crewmembers exit the Operations and Checkout Building to board the Astrovan, which will take them to launch pad 39A for the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-122 mission. On the right (front to back) are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Rex Walheim and European Space Agency's (ESA) Hans Schlegel, both mission specialists. On the left (front to back) are astronauts Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. The launch will be the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the ESA Columbus laboratory to the International Space Station (ISS). During the 11-day mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0200.jpg

STS122-S-009 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the 11-day mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0203.jpg

STS122-S-050 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0246

STS122-S-052 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pd0248

STS122-S-060 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pp0292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mission Specialist Leland Melvin signals his readiness for the launch of space shuttle Atlantis on the STS-122 mission while he dons the launch and entry suit. The launch, scheduled for 2:45 p.m. EST, will be the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory to the International Space Station. During the 11-day mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0183

STS122-S-062 (7 Feb. 2008) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member STS-122 crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 2:45 p.m. (EST). The launch is the third attempt for Atlantis since December 2007 to carry the European Space Agency's (ESA) Columbus laboratory to the station. During the mission, the crew's prime objective is to attach the laboratory to the Harmony module, adding to the station's size and capabilities. Onboard are astronauts Steve Frick, commander; Alan Poindexter, pilot; Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, ESA's Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and ESA's Leopold Eyharts, all mission specialists. Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the ISS. 08pp0295