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99-E-14665 (27 February 1999) --- Astronauts Edward T. Lu (left) and Jeffrey N. Williams check out full-scale training hardware for the International Space Station (ISS) in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. The two mission specialists, along with other members of the STS-101 crew, are currently in training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center for next year's STS-101 mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Editor's Note: Since this photograph was taken, changes in crew personnel have been made. Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14665

99-E-14662 (27 February 1999)--- From the left, astronauts Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward T. Lu, along with cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, familiarize themselves with training hardware at the Hydrolab facility in Star City, Russia. The three mission specialists, along with other members of their seven person crew, are currently training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center for next year's scheduled STS-101 mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Editor's Note: Since this photograph was taken, changes in crew personnel have been made. Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14662

At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., members of two Shuttle crews look at components of a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS). From left are STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette and Daniel T. Barry, Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan; three technicians from DaimlerChrysler Aerospace; (in the background, facing right) STS-101 Commander James Donald Halsell Jr.; STS-101 Mission Specialists Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko, with the Russian Space Agency, and Edward Tsang Lu; and two more technicians from DaimlerChrysler. Both missions include the SPACEHAB Double Module, carrying internal and resupply cargo for Station outfitting. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry the Strela; the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999 KSC-99pp0343

At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., members of two Shuttle crews take a close look at components of a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS). From left are STS-96 Mission Specialists Daniel T. Barry and Tamara E. Jernigan, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialist Julie Payette; next to them is STS-101 Mission Specialist Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko, with the Russian Space Agency. Both missions include the SPACEHAB Double Module, carrying internal and resupply cargo for Station outfitting. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry the Strela; the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999 KSC-99pp0345

Two Shuttle crews take part in familiarization activities at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla. From left are STS-101 Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams and Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko, with the Russian Space Agency; STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan; STS-101 Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (leaning over); a technician with RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia; Manfred Nordhoff, with DaimlerChrysler Aerospace; STS-96 Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry; and another technician with RSC Energia. They are looking at components of the Russian cargo crane, Strela, to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS). Both missions include the SPACEHAB Double Module, carrying internal and resupply cargo for Station outfitting. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry the Strela; the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler Aerospace of Bremen and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999 KSC-99pp0342

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the SPACEHAB Facility, members of the STS-101 crew look over equipment during familiarization activities. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Jeffrey N. Williams, and Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., plus Sean Hicks, with Boeing in Huntsville, Ala. Other crew members are Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), and Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko and Boris Morukov, who represent the Russian Space Agency. Mission STS-101 is the third flight in construction of the International Space Station. The 11-day mission is targeted for launch on December 2, 1999, at Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0369

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-101 crew members take part in a bench review at the SPACEHAB Facility as part of familiarization activities for their upcoming mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), and Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., plus Sean Hicks, with Boeing in Huntsville, Ala. Other crew members are Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), and Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko and Boris Morukov, who represent the Russian Space Agency. Mission STS-101 is the third flight in construction of the International Space Station. The 11-day mission is targeted for launch on December 2, 1999, at Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0367

New official portrait of cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko

Yuri Malenchenko and Boris Morukov participate in bailout training in NBL

Yuri Malenchenko and Boris Morukov participate in bailout training in NBL

Yuri Malenchenko and Boris Morukov participate in bailout training in NBL

99-E-14654 (October 1999) --- Astronaut Edward T. Lu, mission specialist, is assisted by SCUBA-equipped divers during a rehearsal of STS-106 space walk chores in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. Also participating in this simulation but out of frame here was cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, mission specialist who represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14654

99-E-14657 (October 1999) --- Astronaut Edward T. Lu, mission specialist, is assisted by SCUBA-equipped divers during an underwater rehearsal of STS-106 space walk chores in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. Also participating in this simulation but out of frame here was cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA). 99e14657

99-E-14652 (6 October 1999) --- Cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, center, monitors a space walk rehearsal in the Hydrolab facility at Star City, Russia. Also looking on is Michael Hess (foreground), NASA's mission EVA officer. The aquarium-like viewing windows allow observers to be on eye-level with the astronauts training in the pool. The STS-106 crew is currently in Russia preparing for its scheduled visit to the International Space Station (ISS). 99e14652

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission from workers at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. At left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), Edward Lu, and Jeffrey N. Williams, The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1487

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1492
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA) check out part of the Russian crane Strela. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, also with RSA. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1491

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission from workers at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. At left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Edward Lu, Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1488

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission from workers at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. At left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Edward Lu, Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1488
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission from workers at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. At left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Edward Lu, Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1488

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1493
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out some of the cargo that will be carried on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko, also with RSA. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.) and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission. At left are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1489

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission. At left are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1489
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn about some of the cargo that will be on their mission. At left are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams and Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., and Mission Specialist Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). Other crew members are Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1489

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn how to manipulate the Russian crane Strela. At left is Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA); in the center is Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right is Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov (RSA). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1490

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn how to manipulate the Russian crane Strela. At left is Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA); in the center is Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right is Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov (RSA). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1490
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-101 crew learn how to manipulate the Russian crane Strela. At left is Yuri Malenchenko, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA); in the center is Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.); at right is Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams. Other crew members are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott Horowitz, and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov (RSA). The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB's Logistics Double Module. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1490

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Here they are checking out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module. The crew is composed of Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Here checking out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module are (left) Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), and (right) Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other members of the crew taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1500

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Here checking out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module are (left) Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), and (right) Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other members of the crew taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1500
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Here checking out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module are (left) Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), and (right) Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other members of the crew taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1500

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Here they are checking out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module. The crew is composed of Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1501

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. The crew is composed of Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1496

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. At right is Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), who is assisted by a SPACEHAB worker. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. At right is Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), who is assisted by a SPACEHAB worker. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1497
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. At right is Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.), who is assisted by a SPACEHAB worker. Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), at right, talks with workers about the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module at left. The module is part of the payload for the mission. Lu and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko , who are with the Russian Space Agency , are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1503

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), at right, talks with workers about the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module at left. The module is part of the payload for the mission. Lu and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko , who are with the Russian Space Agency , are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1503
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), at right, talks with workers about the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module at left. The module is part of the payload for the mission. Lu and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko , who are with the Russian Space Agency , are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1503

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. From left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other crew members who are taking part in the CEIT are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1495

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. From left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other crew members who are taking part in the CEIT are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1495
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. From left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other crew members who are taking part in the CEIT are Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1495

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), stand inside the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, part of the payload for their mission. They and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko (also with RSA), are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1502

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), stand inside the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, part of the payload for their mission. They and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko (also with RSA), are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1502
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.), Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.) and Boris W. Morukov, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), stand inside the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, part of the payload for their mission. They and other crew members Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko (also with RSA), are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1502

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. At left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr. and Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.); seated on the floor is Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other crew members who are taking part in the CEIT are Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. At left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr. and Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.); seated on the floor is Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other crew members who are taking part in the CEIT are Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1494
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. At left are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr. and Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.); seated on the floor is Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.). Other crew members who are taking part in the CEIT are Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber, (Ph.D.), Jeffrey N. Williams, and Boris W. Morukov and Yuri Malenchenko, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.). Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.). Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1498
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-101 crew members check out the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module that will be part of the payload for their mission. From left are Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu (Ph.D.) and Mary Ellen Weber (Ph.D.). Other crew members taking part in the CEIT are Commander James Donald Halsell Jr., Jeffrey N. Williams, and Yuri Malenchenko and Boris W. Morukov, who are with the Russian Space Agency. The primary objective of the STS-101 mission is to complete the initial outfitting of the International Space Station, making it fully ready for the first long-term crew. The seven-member crew will transfer almost two tons of equipment and supplies from SPACEHAB. Additionally, they will unpack a shipment of supplies delivered earlier by a Russian Progress space tug and begin outfitting the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. Three astronauts will perform two space walks to transfer and install parts of the Russian Strela cargo boom that are attached to SPACEHAB's Integrated Cargo Container, connect utility cables between Zarya and Zvezda, and install a magnetometer/pole assembly on the Service Module. Additional activities for the STS-101 astronauts include working with the Space Experiment Module (SEM-06) and the Mission to America's Remarkable Schools (MARS), two educational initiatives. STS-101 is scheduled for launch no earlier than March 16, 2000 KSC-99pp1498

STS106-363-020 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko works in a crew compartment on Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-370-012 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt & Malenchenko do ingress procedures in Node 1 during STS-106

S106E5190 - STS-106 - MS Morukov and MS Malenchenko working in Progress during STS-106

STS106-322-024 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-373-003 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko works with a stowage bag in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-389-029 - STS-106 - Malenchenko works on storage batteries in Zvezda taken during STS-106

STS106-322-025 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-348-035 - STS-106 - Closeup view of MS Malenchenko working on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-365-020 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko reads through a checklist in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-322-019 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-390-032 - STS-106 - Malenchenko, Mastracchio & Burbank work on a laptop in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-365-014 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko and MS Morukov work in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-319-025 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko close Node 1 hatch to PMA1 during STS-106

STS106-369-019 - STS-106 - Mastracchio,Burbank and Malenchenko pose in SpaceHab during STS-106

S106E5016 - STS-106 - MS Yuri Malenchenko eating a sandwich aboard Atlantis during STS-106

STS106-386-030 - STS-106 - MS Lu and MS Malenchenko check their EMUs in the airlock during STS-106

STS106-386-031 - STS-106 - MS Lu and MS Malenchenko check their EMUs in the airlock during STS-106

S106E5008 - STS-106 - MS Yuri Malenchenko at work aboard Atlantis during STS-106

STS106-365-006 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko hangs a STS-106 logo in Zarya during STS-106

S106E5175 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko working in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-319-023 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko close Node 1 hatch to PMA1 during STS-106

STS106-319-029 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko prepare to egress Node 1 during STS-106

S106E5122 - STS-106 - Commander Wilcutt and MS Malenchenko working in Node 1 during STS-106

STS106-351-002 - STS-106 - Morukov and Malenchenko in the Progress Resupply Vehicle during STS-106

STS106-351-001 - STS-106 - Morukov and Malenchenko in the Progress Resupply Vehicle during STS-106

STS106-370-016 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt & Malenchenko do ingress procedures in PMA1 during STS-106

STS106-374-027 - STS-106 - MS Lu and MS Malenchenko prepare for an EVA on the middeck during STS-106

STS106-369-008 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko drinks tea on the middeck during STS-106

STS106-303-025 - STS-106 - Malenchenko works in the ARCU pit on Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-319-030 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko prepare to egress Node 1 during STS-106

STS106-369-016 - STS-106 - Mastracchio, Burbank and Malenchenko pose in SpaceHab during STS-106

STS106-370-022 - STS-106 - Wilcutt & Malenchenko work with the TORU docking probe during STS-106

S106E5212 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko at work during STS-106

STS106-363-014 - STS-106 - Malenchenko and Lu work on the storage batteries in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-363-015 - STS-106 - Malenchenko and Lu work on the storage batteries in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-322-020 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-319-028 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko prepare to egress Node 1 during STS-106

STS106-370-021 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt & Malenchenko do ingress procedures in PMA1 during STS-106

STS106-319-017 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko move through an FGB hatch during STS-106

STS106-369-018 - STS-106 - Mastracchio, Burbank and Malenchenko pose in SpaceHab during STS-106

STS106-348-012 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko waves while working on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-390-033 - STS-106 - Malenchenko,Mastracchio & Burbank work on a laptop in Zarya during STS-106

S106E5202 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko and MS Lu conduct electrical work in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-352-025 - STS-106 - Lu, Burbank and Malenchenko on the middeck during STS-106

STS106-322-021 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-370-019 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt & Malenchenko do ingress procedures in PMA1 during STS-106

STS106-348-034 - STS-106 - View of MS Malenchenko working on Zvezda during STS-106's EVA

STS106-322-026 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-319-024 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko close Node 1 hatch to PMA1 during STS-106

STS106-336-016 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko in the airlock with a stowage bag during STS-106

STS106-388-016 - STS-106 - Malenchenko works on storage batteries in Zvezda taken during STS-106

STS106-386-032 - STS-106 - MS Burbank and MS Malenchenko pose in the airlock during STS-106

STS106-366-035 - STS-106 - MS Morukov and MS Malenchenko work on the middeck during STS-106

STS106-365-008 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko hangs a STS-106 logo in Zarya during STS-106

STS106-319-031 - STS-106 - Lu, Wilcutt and Malenchenko prepare to egress Node 1 during STS-106

STS106-322-022 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko perform egress procedures in Zarya during STS-106

S106E5197 - STS-106 - MS. Malenchenko in Zvezda during STS-106

S106E5200 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko and MS Lu conduct electrical work in Zvezda during STS-106

S106E5174 - STS-106 - MS Burbank and MS Malenchenko working in Zvezda during STS-106

STS106-319-015 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko move through an FGB hatch during STS-106

STS106-373-002 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko works with a stowage bag in Zarya during STS-106

S106E5120 - STS-106 - Wilcutt, Malenchenko and Lu working in Node 1 during STS-106

STS106-323-026 - STS-106 - MS Morukov and MS Malenchenko work on the middeck during STS-106

STS106-374-018 - STS-106 - Malenchenko, Lu, Burbank and Mastracchio work on the middeck during STS-106

STS106-352-018 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko poses on the middeck during STS-106

S106E5081 - STS-106 - Wilcutt, Malenchenko, Morukov & Burbank onboard Atlantis during STS-106

STS106-319-016 - STS-106 - Wilcutt and Malenchenko move through an FGB hatch during STS-106

STS106-388-004 - STS-106 - MS Malenchenko works with the aft hatch docking probe during STS-106

STS106-302-028 - STS-106 - Mastracchio, Malenchenko and Burbank at work on Unity during STS-106