PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

S49-03-018 - STS-049 - Crew members perform inflight maintenance tasks and experiments on middeck

STS072-310-005 - STS-072 - Commander Brian Duffy performs inflight maintenance tasks in the orbiter middeck

Workers move a box containing a segment of the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) into the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. It joins two other segments for a campaign of prelaunch processing activities CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0544

Workers uncrate a segment of the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. It joins two other segments for a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pd0545

Workers guide a segment of the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) past the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The segment joins two others for a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0547

The Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC to begin a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0543

The Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC to begin a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pd0542

The Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) arrives at Kennedy Space Center to begin a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pd0541

Workers guide a segment of the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. It joins two other segments for a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pd0546

Segments of the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) are lined up in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. They will undergo a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0548

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility raise two segments of the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is at KSC to begin a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. It is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0570

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility raise a segment of the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to move it to a workstand. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is at KSC to begin a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. It is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0569

Workers in the in the Space Station Processing Facility move two segments of the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to a workstand. CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement.. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is at KSC to begin a campaign of prelaunch processing activities. It is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100, currently planned for July 2000 KSC-99pp0571

In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers perform prelaunch processing activities on the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for April 2001 KSC-00pp0507

In the Space Station Processing Facility, two workers perform prelaunch processing activities on the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for April 2001 KSC-00pp0509

In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker performs prelaunch processing activities on the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). CSA's first contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the ISS for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Latching End Effectors are mounted on each end of the arm for grappling. Video cameras mounted on the booms and end effectors will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the ISS. The SSRMS is scheduled to be launched aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-100, currently planned for April 2001 KSC-00pp0508

Workers (center) in the Space Station Processing Facility, explain use of video cameras to members of the STS-100 crew (far left and far right) during Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. The cameras will be mounted on the booms and end effectors of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), also known as the Canadian arm, and will give astronauts maximum visibility for operations and maintenance tasks on the International Space Station. Part of the payload on mission STS-100, the SSRMS is the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the International Space Station for assembly. The 56-foot-long robotic arm includes two 12-foot booms joined by a hinge. Seven joints on the arm allow highly flexible and precise movement. Mission STS-100 is scheduled to launch April 19, 2001 KSC-00pp1451

Reiter during maintenance tasks in the FGB

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, or SSPF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, sections of the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, are lined up under cover. In front of them is a poster that illustrates the assembled third and final component of the mobile servicing system on the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd2367

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A poster in the Space Station Processing Facility, or SSPF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center illustrates the assembled Dextre, the third and final component of the mobile servicing system on the International Space Station. The Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. The poster sits in front of the draped sections in the SSPF. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd2366

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a crane lifts the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, high above the heads of the workers below to a position on a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2564

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, technicians monitor the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, as a crane moves it into position on a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2567

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a crane lifts the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, to position it onto a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2562

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, technicians prepare the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, for its move onto a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2561

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, technicians adjust the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, into position on a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2568

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, technicians monitor the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, as a crane moves it near its destination onto a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2565

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, technicians guide the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, as a crane lowers it toward a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2566

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, technicians monitor the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, as a crane moves it into position onto a pallet. Processing of the payload is under way for its mission to the International Space Station. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. Dextre is part of the payload scheduled on mission STS-123, targeted to launch Feb. 14, 2008. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2563

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Endeavour's STS-123 Pilot Gregory Johnson looks over part of the payload on the mission, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the International Space Station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. The crew is at Kennedy for crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on Feb. 14. It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-123 Commander Dominic Gorie (second from left) and Pilot Gregory Johnson (second from right) look over payload information. On the mission, space shuttle Endeavour will carry the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre, and the Japanese Experiment Module's Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section, or ELM-PS. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the International Space Station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. The crew is at Kennedy for crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on Feb. 14. It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-123 crew, dressed in protective suits, get ready to inspect part of the payload for the mission, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre. At left is Commander Dominic Gorie and at center is Mission Specialist Michael Foreman. At right are Pilot Gregory Johnson and Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the International Space Station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. The crew is at Kennedy for crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on Feb. 14. It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-123 crew get ready to inspect part of the payload for the mission, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, known as Dextre. Seen in front are Pilot Gregory Johnson and Mission Specialist Takao Doi, who represents the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency. Dextre will work with the mobile base and Canadarm2 on the International Space Station to perform critical construction and maintenance tasks. The crew is at Kennedy for crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on Feb. 14. It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3496