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LIFTOFF

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-REDSTONE (MR)-1A - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-REDSTONE (MR)-2 - CAPE

MA-6 - LIFTOFF

MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-2 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

Liftoff of MR-BD carrying a dummy capsule. Pad 5 Photo by: Special & Hopkins 61C-532

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MR)-3- FLIGHT ATTEMPT - MECHANICAL ASTRONAUT - CAPE

ASTRONAUT ALAN SHEPARD - FREEDOM "7" - LIFTOFF - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-REDSTONE - (MR)-3 - "FREEDOM 7" - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-4 - CAPSULE 8A - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-4 - CAPE

MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-5 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

Astronaut Carpenter, Scott - Mercury-Atlas (MA)-7 - Liftoff - Cape

LIFTOFF RANGER 3 FROM PAD 12. ATLAS AGENA-2

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-7 - ASTRONAUT CARPENTER, SCOTT M. - CAPE

Photograph of Liftoff of Aurora 7 Spacecraft

Photograph of Astronaut Malcolm Scott Carpenter Inside Aurora 7 Ready for Liftoff

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-7 - ASTRONAUT CARPENTER - CAPE

LIFTOFF - "SIGMA " 7" - LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-8 - CAPE

MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-8 - "SIGMA-7" - LIFTOFF - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 - CAPE

MERCURY-ATALS (MA)-9 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 - CAPE

ASTRONAUT COOPER, GORDON L., JR. - LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 -CAPE

Mercury-Redstone (MR-1) - Liftoff - Cape

Little Joe II and Boilerplate #6 liftoff at Wallops Island, Virginia

Apollo Boilerplate 12- Liftoff

Aerial view Gemini/Titan-II launch vehicle #1 liftoff at Cape Kennedy

Gemini/Titan-II launch vehicle #1 liftoff at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - DISTANT VIEW - CAPE

Liftoff of Gemini-Titan 3 mission

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-5 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-6 - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - CAPE

Liftoff- GT-7

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-6 - SHUTDOWN - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-6 (DISTANT VIEW) - CAPE

KSC-66C-1847 Gemini-8 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and David Scott enjoy breakfast with fellow Astronauts prior to Liftoff. (jrs) 104-KSC-66C-1847

KSC-66C-1872 Gemini 8 Command Pilot Neil A. Armstrong seen through window of Gemini 8 Spacecraft just before liftoff. (jrs) 104-KSC-66C-1872

KSC-66C-1871 Gemini 8 Pilot David R. Scott seen through window of Gemini 8 Spacecraft just before liftoff. (jrs) 104-KSC-66C-1871

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 - ATLAS/AGENA - LIFTOFF - CAPE

KSC-66C-1852 Gemini-8 Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott are helped into their Gemini 8 Spacecraft by White Room technicians at Complex 19, Cape Kennedy, Prior to Liftoff. (jrs) 104-KSC-66C-1852

LIFTOFF - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - LIFTOFF - ATLAS/AUGMENTED TARGET DOCKING ADAPTER (ATDA) - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - LIFTOFF - CAPE

Liftoff - Saturn Mission 203 - KSC

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 - LIFTOFF - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 - LIFTOFF - KALEIDOSCOPE EFFECT - CAPE

LIFTOFF - APOLLO/SATURN (A/S)-202 MISSION - KSC

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - LIFTOFF - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-12 - LIFTOFF - ATLAS/AGENA - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-12 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-12 - LIFTOFF - OFFICIAL - CAPE

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed “The Arm Farm”, the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage. n/a

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s.  Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets.  Affectionately nicknamed “The Arm Farm”, the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions.  The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage. n/a
The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed “The Arm Farm”, the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage. n/a

Saturn 501 - Apollo Saturn V liftoff from Complex 39A at 7 a.m. 9 November 1967 at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. KSC-67PC-0435

Apollo 4 liftoff

Apollo V - Liftoff - Cape

Apollo V - Liftoff - Cape

F-1 engines of Apollo/Saturn V first stage leave trail of flame after liftoff

F-1 engines of Apollo/Saturn V first stage leave trail of flame after liftoff

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An overhead crane lifts the Saturn V first stage for the Apollo 11 mission from the transfer aisle floor in preparation for stacking on a mobile launcher within the Vehicle Assembly Building's High Bay 1. The fully assembled vehicle will be called the Apollo/Saturn 506. The 138-foot-long stage, to which two additional stages -- the instrument unit and the Apollo spacecraft -- will be added, will generate a liftoff thrust of 7.7 million pounds. Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. will pilot the mission which is to include a lunar landing in the lunar module by Armstrong and Aldrin. KSC-69PC-69

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 prime crew poses for a photograph during a walk-through egress test. The hands-on test is in preparation for the first manned lunar landing mission scheduled for liftoff in July ksc-69pc-295

Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins appears to be explaining a point about his spacesuit glove to technician Joe Schmitt during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff for the first manned lunar landing. KSC-69PC-373

Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong is looking over flight plans while being assisted by a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission ksc-69pc-376

Liftoff - Apollo XI - Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Vice President Spiro Agnew [right center] and Former President Lyndon Johnson (left center] view the liftoff of Apollo 11 from the stands located at the Kennedy Space Center VIP viewing site. The two political figures were at the Kennedy Space Center to witness the launch of the first Manned Lunar Landing mission which took place from Pad 39A at 9:32 a.m. EDT. ksc-69pc-379

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Hundreds of news media representatives prepare for the big moment -- the liftoff of Apollo 11. That moment came at 9:32 a.m. EDT as Apollo 11 lifted off its launch pad to begin the first manned lunar landing mission. The space vehicle is seen on its mobile launcher at Pad 39A (center-rear, across water), prior to the liftoff. More than 3,000 press representatives witnessed the liftoff. KSC-69PC-401

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle, at Launch Pad 39A, awaits the liftoff scheduled for 9:32 a.m. EDT today, along with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-443

Liftoff - Apollo XI - Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Personnel within the Launch Control Center watch the Apollo 11 liftoff from Launch Complex 39A today at the start of the historic lunar landing mission. The LCC is located three-and-one-half miles from the launch pad. KSC-69PC-387

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (front) and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. walk across the mobile launcher to enter their Apollo 11 spacecraft. Along with them is Joe Schmidt, a suit technician from Johnson Space Center. Not shown is the third member of the crew, astronaut Michael Collins. Liftoff of Apollo 11 is scheduled at 9:32 a.m. EDT from Pad 39A, which will begin man's first lunar landing mission. KSC-69PC-399

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle climbs toward orbit after liftoff from Pad 39A at 9:32 a.m. EDT. In two-and-a-half minutes of powered flight, the S-IC booster lifts the vehicle to an altitude of about 39 miles approximately 55 miles downrange. This photo was taken with a 70-mm telescopic camera mounted in an Air force EC-135N plane. Onboard are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a Lunar Module (LM) to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the Command Module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two-and-one-half hours outside the LM. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments that will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins in the Command Module for the return trip to Earth. KSC-69PC-413

Personnel within the Launch Control Center watch the Apollo 11 liftoff from Launch Complex 39A today at the start of the historic lunar landing mission. The LCC is located three and one-half miles from the launch pad. KSC-69PC-0387

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the Kennedy Space Center government-industry team rise from their consoles within the Launch Control Center to watch the Apollo 11 liftoff through a window. Photo credit: NASA KSC-69P-631

Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong prepares to put on his helmet with the assistance of a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission ksc-69pc-377

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. is being assisted by a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff for the first manned lunar landing mission. KSC-69PC-381

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. appears to be relaxed during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission ksc-69pc-382

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Liftoff of Apollo 11 from Launch Pad 39A with astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin Jr. and Miichael Collins onboard. KSC-69P-446

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS - With a half-Earth in the background, the Lunar Module ascent stage with Moon-walking astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin Jr. approaches for a rendezvous with the Apollo Command Module manned by Michael Collins. The Apollo 11 liftoff from the Moon came early, ending a 22-hour stay on the Moon by Armstrong and Aldrin. KSC-as11-44-6642

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, President Richard M. Nixon speaks in the Launch Control Center after the successful liftoff of the Apollo 12 space vehicle, which sent astronauts Charles Conrad, Jr., Richard F. Gordon and Alan Bean on the first leg of their lunar landing mission. With the President are Paul Donnelly, Launch Operations manager, on the left, and First Lady Pat Nixon, on the right. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-69P-0852

View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 liftoff

View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 liftoff

Apollo 14 - Saturn Apollo Program

View of the U.S. flag near the Apollo 14 landing site during liftoff

APOLLO XV - (LIFTOFF) - CAPE

Apollo 15 Lunar Module "Falcon" seen before ascent stage liftoff

Apollo 15 Lunar Module (LM) View - Liftoff - Moon - TV Monitor - Mission Control Center (MCC) - MSC

Apollo 16 liftoff

APOLLO XVI - LIFTOFF - KSC