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Balloon hot air colors.

Balloon hot air colors.

Balloon hot air balloon ride hot air balloon.

Balloon hot air balloon ride hot air balloon.

Space shuttle lift-off liftoff, science technology.

Space shuttle lift-off liftoff, science technology.

Balloon hot air colors.

Balloon hot air colors.

Pad 6. Launch of US Army Redstone (2040) for accuracy and vehicle re-entry observation, at 9: 30 P.M. EST. (Lift-off) Photo by: Bundy. LOD-KSC-61C-413

Pad 6.  Launch of US Army Redstone (2040) for accuracy and vehicle re-entry observation, at 9: 30 P.M. EST.  (Lift-off) Photo by: Bundy. LOD-KSC-61C-413

Lift-off of Atlas-Agena 7, Ranger V. (Test 5050)(ITEM 1.3- ) 62PC-80

Lift-off of Atlas-Agena 7, Ranger V. (Test 5050)(ITEM 1.3- ) 62PC-80

Sequence 6 of 22 showing the lift-off and explosion of A/C-5. 65C-1227.6

Sequence 6 of 22 showing the lift-off and explosion of A/C-5. 65C-1227.6

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed “The Arm Farm”, the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage. n/a

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s.  Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets.  Affectionately nicknamed “The Arm Farm”, the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions.  The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage. n/a

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

A ground-to-air view of the space shuttle Challenger during liftoff from launch complex 39A at 7:33 a.m. EDT. Aboard the Challenger for the seventh launch of the Space Transportation System are CMDR Bob Crippen, pilot Frederick H. Hauck, and mission specialists Sally Ride, John M. Fabian and Dr. Norman Thagard

A ground-to-air view of the space shuttle Challenger during liftoff from launch complex 39A at 7:33 a.m. EDT. Aboard the Challenger for the seventh launch of the Space Transportation System are CMDR Bob Crippen, pilot Frederick H. Hauck, and mission specialists Sally Ride, John M. Fabian and Dr. Norman Thagard

A helium-filled balloon is readied for lift-off by members of the Balloon Research and Development Test Branch, Air Force Geophysics Laboratory

A helium-filled balloon is readied for lift-off by members of the Balloon Research and Development Test Branch, Air Force Geophysics Laboratory

Flight deck crewmen aboard the destroyer USS JOHN HANCOCK (DD-981) prepare an SH-2 Seasprite light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopter from Light Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron 34 (HSL-34) for lift-off

Flight deck crewmen aboard the destroyer USS JOHN HANCOCK (DD-981) prepare an SH-2 Seasprite light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopter from Light Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron 34 (HSL-34) for lift-off

A CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter prepares for lift-off aboard the amphibious assault ship USS SAIPAN (LHA-2) during exercise Ocean Venture '81

A CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter prepares for lift-off aboard the amphibious assault ship USS SAIPAN (LHA-2) during exercise Ocean Venture '81

Lift-off of the FLTSATCOM communications satellite aboard the Atlas Centaur 59 launch vehicle from the Complex 36B

Lift-off of the FLTSATCOM communications satellite aboard the Atlas Centaur 59 launch vehicle from the Complex 36B

Lift-off of an SBS-B, satellite business system, aboard the Delta 156 launch vehicle from Complex 17

Lift-off of an SBS-B, satellite business system, aboard the Delta 156 launch vehicle from Complex 17

A ground-to-air left side view of a BQM-34S Firebee I remotely-piloted target vehicle moments after lift-off from launch pad #55 at the Pacific Missile Test Center. The jet-assisted take-off bottle (JATO) has just separated from the rear of the drone

A ground-to-air left side view of a BQM-34S Firebee I remotely-piloted target vehicle moments after lift-off from launch pad #55 at the Pacific Missile Test Center. The jet-assisted take-off bottle (JATO) has just separated from the rear of the drone

A ground-to-air view of an MGM-118A Peacekeeper international ballistic missile moments after lift-off from the launch canister. This is the first test launch of the Peacekeeper

A ground-to-air view of an MGM-118A Peacekeeper international ballistic missile moments after lift-off from the launch canister. This is the first test launch of the Peacekeeper

The space shuttle orbiter Challenger lifts off from Complex 39A at 7:33 a.m. EDT. Aboard the seventh flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-7) are: Bob Crippen, commander; Frederick H. Hauck, pilot; and mission specialists Sally Ride, John Fabian and Dr. Norman Thagard

The space shuttle orbiter Challenger lifts off from Complex 39A at 7:33 a.m. EDT. Aboard the seventh flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-7) are: Bob Crippen, commander; Frederick H. Hauck, pilot; and mission specialists Sally Ride, John Fabian and Dr. Norman Thagard

A CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopter prepares for lift-off from the deck of the amphibious assault ship USS GUADALCANAL (LPH 7). The ship is preparing to depart for the Persian Gulf

A CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopter prepares for lift-off from the deck of the amphibious assault ship USS GUADALCANAL (LPH 7). The ship is preparing to depart for the Persian Gulf

A plane director signals instructions to the pilot of a CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopter as it prepares for lift-off from the deck of the amphibious assault ship USS GUADALCANAL (LPH 7). The ship is preparing to depart for the Persian Gulf

A plane director signals instructions to the pilot of a CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopter as it prepares for lift-off from the deck of the amphibious assault ship USS GUADALCANAL (LPH 7). The ship is preparing to depart for the Persian Gulf

Smoke billows and fragments fly from a Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) launcher as the nosecone of an Army Tactical Missile System (TACMS) missile emerges upon lift-off at Launch Complex 33

Smoke billows and fragments fly from a Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) launcher as the nosecone of an Army Tactical Missile System (TACMS) missile emerges upon lift-off at Launch Complex 33

A close-in view of the right front side of an F-14A Tomcat aircraft of Fighter Squadron 32 (VF-32) just after lift-off from runway 05 for a training sortie

A close-in view of the right front side of an F-14A Tomcat aircraft of Fighter Squadron 32 (VF-32) just after lift-off from runway 05 for a training sortie

A US Marine Corps CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 166 (HMM-166) prepares to lift-off at Kaneohe Bay Marine Corps Station, HI. Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Camp Pendleton, CA conducted simulated Noncombatant Evacuation exercises during Operation RIMPAC 96

A US Marine Corps CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 166 (HMM-166) prepares to lift-off at Kaneohe Bay Marine Corps Station, HI. Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Camp Pendleton, CA conducted simulated Noncombatant Evacuation exercises during Operation RIMPAC 96

A McDonnell Douglas DELTA II Space Launch Vehicle sits poised on Complex 17A waiting to carry the 27th Global Positioning System (GPS-27) Satellite into orbit. Lift-off is scheduled at 4:49 A.M. EDT today

A McDonnell Douglas DELTA II Space Launch Vehicle sits poised on Complex 17A waiting to carry the 27th Global Positioning System (GPS-27) Satellite into orbit. Lift-off is scheduled at 4:49 A.M. EDT today

A McDonnell Douglas DELTA II Space Launch Vehicle sits poised on Complex 17A waiting to carry NASA's Mars Global Surveyor into orbit. Lift-off is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. EST today

A McDonnell Douglas DELTA II Space Launch Vehicle sits poised on Complex 17A waiting to carry NASA's Mars Global Surveyor into orbit. Lift-off is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. EST today

A McDonnell Douglas DELTA II Space Launch Vehicle sits poised on Complex 17B awaiting to carry NASA's Mars pathfinder into orbit. Lift-off is scheduled at 1:58 A.M. EST today

A McDonnell Douglas DELTA II Space Launch Vehicle sits poised on Complex 17B awaiting to carry NASA's Mars pathfinder into orbit. Lift-off is scheduled at 1:58 A.M. EST today

Some thirty seconds after lift-off, a Titan II rocket makes it's way into the upper atmosphere above Vandenberg AFB, Calif. The rocket is carrying the first 5 of the 66 Iridium satellites that will make up the Iridium satellite constellation allowing people to communicate with anyone, anytime, anyplace on earth

Some thirty seconds after lift-off, a Titan II rocket makes it's way into the upper atmosphere above Vandenberg AFB, Calif. The rocket is carrying the first 5 of the 66 Iridium satellites that will make up the Iridium satellite constellation allowing people to communicate with anyone, anytime, anyplace on earth

An aerial view of the Delta II rocket prior to lift-off at Space Launch Complex 2. The rocket is carrying the first 5 of the 66 Iridium satellites that will make up the Iridium satellite constellation allowing people to communicate with anyone, anytime, anyplace on earth

An aerial view of the Delta II rocket prior to lift-off at Space Launch Complex 2. The rocket is carrying the first 5 of the 66 Iridium satellites that will make up the Iridium satellite constellation allowing people to communicate with anyone, anytime, anyplace on earth

An aerial view of the Delta II rocket prior to lift-off at Space Launch Complex 2. The rocket was carrying the first 5 of the 66 Iridium satellites that will make up the Iridium satellite constellation allowing people to communicate with anyone, anytime, anyplace on earth

An aerial view of the Delta II rocket prior to lift-off at Space Launch Complex 2. The rocket was carrying the first 5 of the 66 Iridium satellites that will make up the Iridium satellite constellation allowing people to communicate with anyone, anytime, anyplace on earth

A UH-1 helicopter prepares to lift-off on a flight to Camp Kinser. General Charles C. Krulak, Commandant of the Marine Corps, straps himself in for an enjoyable flight

A UH-1 helicopter prepares to lift-off on a flight to Camp Kinser. General Charles C. Krulak, Commandant of the Marine Corps, straps himself in for an enjoyable flight

This CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter's crew chief evaluates the area around Landing Zone Albatross before lift-off during a MCCREE field excercise. The 6th Marine Regiment conducted a MCCREE (Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation) for the 1ST Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. A MCCREE encompasses an evaluation of the overall combat readiness skills of an infantry battalion

This CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter's crew chief evaluates the area around Landing Zone Albatross before lift-off during a MCCREE field excercise. The 6th Marine Regiment conducted a MCCREE (Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation) for the 1ST Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. A MCCREE encompasses an evaluation of the overall combat readiness skills of an infantry battalion

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sign on the fence at Launch Pad 39A announces the mission of STS-88 and Space Shuttle Endeavour, poised on the pad for launch. Lift-off is targeted for 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. The first U.S. launch for the International Space Station, STS-88 is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries KSC-98pc1749

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sign on the fence at Launch Pad 39A announces the mission of STS-88 and Space Shuttle Endeavour, poised on the pad for launch. Lift-off is targeted for 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. The first U.S. launch for the International Space Station, STS-88 is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries KSC-98pc1749

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A rolled back, the Space Shuttle Endeavour on top of the Mobile Launcher Platform is poised for launch on mission STS-88. Lift-off is targeted for 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. The first U.S. launch for the International Space Station, STS-88 is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries KSC-98pc1748

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A rolled back, the Space Shuttle Endeavour on top of the Mobile Launcher Platform is poised for launch on mission STS-88. Lift-off is targeted for 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. The first U.S. launch for the International Space Station, STS-88 is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries KSC-98pc1748

A United States Army remote-controlled "B.A.T.S." target rocket, at the moment of lift-off from its launchpad, on the E-1 range at Camp Lejeune's Onslow Beach area during a 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense (LAAD) Battalion missile targeting exercise. Marines from the 2nd LAAD Battalion, stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, were using the versatile rockets as fast-moving targets, firing Stinger missiles at them from the Avenger system mounted atop High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV) (not shown)

A United States Army remote-controlled "B.A.T.S." target rocket, at the moment of lift-off from its launchpad, on the E-1 range at Camp Lejeune's Onslow Beach area during a 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense (LAAD) Battalion missile targeting exercise. Marines from the 2nd LAAD Battalion, stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, were using the versatile rockets as fast-moving targets, firing Stinger missiles at them from the Avenger system mounted atop High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV) (not shown)

A Titan II rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The rocket took off from Space Launch Complex-4 west carrying NASA's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-L weather satellite. The launch is the result of a combined effort by the men and women of the 30th Space Wing, NASA and the Space and Missile Systems Center in Los Angeles. The spacelift commander for this mission was US Air Force Colonel Steve Lanning, 30th Space Wing commander. US Air Force Major Dave Salm, 2nd Space Launch Squadron, is the Air Force launch director. NOAA-L will primarily provide long-range weather forecasting. It will operate in tandem with currently orbiting NOAA satellites. NOAA-L ...

A Titan II rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The rocket took off from Space Launch Complex-4 west carrying NASA's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-L weather satellite. The launch is the result of a combined effort by the men and women of the 30th Space Wing, NASA and the Space and Missile Systems Center in Los Angeles. The spacelift commander for this mission was US Air Force Colonel Steve Lanning, 30th Space Wing commander. US Air Force Major Dave Salm, 2nd Space Launch Squadron, is the Air Force launch director. NOAA-L will primarily provide long-range weather forecasting. It will operate in tandem with currently orbiting NOAA satellites. NOAA-L ...

A medium-range separating target missile is seen seconds after lift-off from the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii (HI). Six minutes later, the target was intercepted by a developmental Standard Missile Three (SM-3) launched from the Pearl Harbor based Ticonderoga Class Guided Missile Cruiser USS LAKE ERIE (CG 70) [not shown]. The test was the sixth intercept, in seven ight tests, by the AEGIS (Airborne Early-Warning Ground-Environmental Integration Segment) Ballistic Missile Defense, the maritime component of the "Hit to Kill" Ballistic Missile Defense System, being developed by the Missile Defense Agency. All previous Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense...

A medium-range separating target missile is seen seconds after lift-off from the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii (HI). Six minutes later, the target was intercepted by a developmental Standard Missile Three (SM-3) launched from the Pearl Harbor based Ticonderoga Class Guided Missile Cruiser USS LAKE ERIE (CG 70) [not shown]. The test was the sixth intercept, in seven ight tests, by the AEGIS (Airborne Early-Warning Ground-Environmental Integration Segment) Ballistic Missile Defense, the maritime component of the "Hit to Kill" Ballistic Missile Defense System, being developed by the Missile Defense Agency. All previous Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, technicians install auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces. The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system. One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout. On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1653

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, technicians install auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces.  The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system.  One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout.  On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1653

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, is ready for installation in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces. The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system. One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout. On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1650

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, is ready for installation in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission.  The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces.  The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system.  One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout.  On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1650

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, technicians begin installation of an auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces. The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system. One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout. On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1652

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, technicians begin installation of an auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces.  The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system.  One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout.  On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1652

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, technicians begin installation of an auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces. The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system. One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout. On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1651

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, technicians begin installation of an auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, in space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces.  The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system.  One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout.  On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1651

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, is in place on space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces. The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system. One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout. On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1654

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, is in place on space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission.  The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces.  The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system.  One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout.  On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1654

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT.The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight. Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment. Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray, Tom Farrar KSC-2009-2075

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission.  The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT.The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight.  Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment.  Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray, Tom Farrar KSC-2009-2075

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight. Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment. Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2072

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission.  The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight.  Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment.  Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2072

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight. Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment. Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2078

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission.  The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT.  The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight.  Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment.  Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science.  Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2078

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight. Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment. Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2071

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Billows of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida capture the brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission.  The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight.  Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment.  Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2071

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission lights up the clouds of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight. Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment. Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray, Tom Farrar KSC-2009-2076

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission lights up the clouds of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight.  Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment.  Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray, Tom Farrar KSC-2009-2076

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission lights up the clouds of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight. Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment. Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2077

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The brilliant light of space shuttle Discovery's lift-off on the STS-119 mission lights up the clouds of smoke and the water near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch was on time at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The STS-119 mission is the 28th to the International Space Station and the 125th space shuttle flight.  Discovery will deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and the S6 truss segment.  Installation of S6 will signal the station's readiness to house a six-member crew for conducting increased science.  Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Kevin O'Connell KSC-2009-2077

Soyuz rocket launch night.

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Rocket launch spacex lift-off, transportation traffic.

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Rocket launch night countdown, transportation traffic.

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Rocket lift-off liftoff, science technology.

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Rocket launch night countdown, transportation traffic.

Rocket launch night countdown, transportation traffic.