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Lend-Lease to Britain. Tommy-guns arriving in England from the United States under lend-lease are unpacked and checked by an ordnance corporal. The guns arrived complete, ready to be fired

Lend-lease to Britain. Spare parts of an American-made motorcycle shipped to England as lend-lease are unpacked at an ordnance depot

Lend-Lease to Britain. A "Whirlwind" radial airplane engine shipped by the United States as lend-lease is assembled at an ordnance depot in the English Midlands

Lend-Lease to Britain. An American light tank is unloaded at a central ordnance depot in England, part of a lend-lease shipment from the United States

Lend-Lease to Britain. An American-made searchlight, shipped from the United States to England as lend-lease, is unpacked at an ordnance depot on its way to service

Lend-lease to Britain. Cases of TNT gun powder shipped from the United States under lend-lease are stacked in the dump in a tunnel one hundred feet underground dug out of solid rock, in western England. The staff here works twenty-four hours a day handling lend-lease materials arriving from the United States

Reciprocal aid. American soldiers, sailors, and marines, recuperating from wounds and illness on roof of a new 3 million dollae hospital which government of Australia, without cost to the United States has provided for our forces, "somewhere in Australia." Huge red cross identifies building for passing airplanes. Hospital is one of many facilities given the United States by Australia as reciprocal lend-lease

Reciprocal aid. New ten-story hospital "somewhere in Australia" which the government of Australia has provided under reciprocal lend-lease, without payment by the United States, for care of American troops recuperating from illness and wounds

American lend-lease equipment is playing a vital part in the development of United Nations mechanized forces. Here, an American light tank, to be used for training Australia's armored crews, is unloaded at an Australian port

Lend-lease in action. American M-3 tanks, "General Grants," are in action in Africa and are preparing for battle in Australia. The picture shows an M-3 tank, lend-leased to the United Nations, being hoisted aboard a cargo vessel at an unnamed American port

One year of reciprocal aid. Practically everything needed by our forces in Britain is supplied by the British government under reciprocal lend-lease. American soldiers here use British made guns and ammunition in training to defend U.S. bomber- fighter and aircraft repair bases in Great Britain. They are shown here firing British 3.7 inch anti-aircraft guns in Britain

Waste paper. Outdated telephone directories are a good source of the paper packing so badly needed today for shipment of defense and lend-lease goods. This pile of directories is in the stock room of a Philadelphia paper mill, which will make pasteboard packing out of it

Lend-Lease to Britain. Shipment of machine tools shipped from the United States as lend-lease arrive at a central ordnance depot in England

Lend-Lease to Britain. An American light tank is unloaded at a central ordnance depot in England, part of a lend-lease shipment from the United States

Lend-Lease to Britain. Diesel searchlight generator sets, just arrived in England from the United States as part of a lend-lease shipment, are made ready for issue

Lend-Lease to Britain. American-made 155 mm. shells shipped from the United States as lend-lease, are stacked in an ammunition dump hewn from solid rock one hundred feet below the surface in England

Lend-Lease to Britain. American 1,100-pound bombs to be used by the Royal Air Force are stacked in an ammunition dump in England, after arriving from the United States in a lend-lease shipment. The dump is in a tunnel one hundred feet underground hewn from solid rock

Waste paper. Outdated telephone directories are a good source of the paper packing so badly needed today for shipment of defense and lend-lease goods. This pile of directories is in the stock room of a Philadelphia paper mill, which will make pasteboard packing out of it

Waste paper. Destined for destruction, this household rubbish heap contains waste paper so badly needed today for conversion into the paper packing in which defense and lend-lease goods are shipped. Paper is one of the materials with which Americans have been most profligate, only now they are beginning to conserve paper along with many other materials long thought of as merely refuse

Waste paper. For defense use, this pile of waste paper is being delivered by a dealer to a large Philadelphia paper mill. There it will be chopped up and combined with water, then pressed into pasteboard packing so vitally needed for shipment of defense and lend-lease goods

Reciprocal aid. New ten-story hospital "somewhere in Australia" which the government of Australia has provided under reciprocal lend-lease, without payment by the United States, for care of American troops recuperating from illness and wounds

One year of reciprocal aid. Australian beef cattle on the long trek that leads to an American Army mess. Under reciprocal lend-lease, our armed forces have received from Australia 26,900,000 pounds of beaf and veal, lamb, mutton and pork, 20,000,000 pounds of potatoes, 1,800,000 dozens of eggs and 5,464,000 quarts of milk, and many other foodstuffs

Lend-lease to Britain. American-made tommy-guns shipped from the United States as a lend-lease are unpacked and checked for immediate distribution to units at an ordnance depot in England

Lend-Lease to Britain. American tank transporter, shipped to England under lend-lease goes into service at a central ordnance depot in the English Midlands

Lend-Lease to Britain. Radio outfits shipped from the United States under lend-lease arrive at an ordnance depot in England. They include reception sets spare valves and (on shelf) American tank radio sets

Lend-Lease to Britain. American-built 155 mm. howitzers shipped to England as lend-lease reach an ordnance depot on their way to action

Lend-lease to Britain. Cases of American spare parts arriving at an English ordnance center as part of a lend-lease shipment from the United States are moved to the stores for unloading. English girls, driving trucks, help with the task

Lend-Lease to Britain. A shipment of 155 mm. howitzers just arrived from the United States under lend-lease is prepared for service at an ordnance depot in England

Lend-Lease to Britain. American-made 38-caliber revolvers shipped to England from the United States under lend-lease are unpacked at an English ordnance depot

Lend-Lease to Britain. Aerial bombs of 250 tons shipped from the United States under lend-lease are stacked in a dump hewn from solid rock one hundred feet below the surface in England

Lend-Lease to Britain. In an ammunition dump in England, hewn from solid rock one hundred feet below surface, a shipment of 30-caliber tracer ammunition shipped from the United States as lend-lease is stacked by English workmen

Lend-Lease to Britain. American-made 155 mm. shells shipped from the United States as lend-lease are stacked in an ammunition dump hewn from solid rock one hundred feet below the surface in England

Reciprocal aid. Broad verandas are a feature of a new 3,000,000 dollar hospital building "somewhere in Australia" which government of Australia has provided without payment for recuperating American soldiers, sailors and marines, under reciprocal lend-lease

How lend-lease strikes at the Axis. A lend-lease tank coming over the side of a cargo ship in a United States Atlantic Coast port. Many tanks are carried as deck-load

Waste paper. Waste is an American characteristic. For too many years we have simply thrown things out when we were through with them, without a thought that they might be reused. Here on this garbage scow carrying rubbish for disposal is a huge stock of waster paper, so vitally needed today for conversion into the paper packing for defense and lend-lease products

Lend-lease to Britain. Telephone coils, part of a shipment of lend-lease materials shipped to England by the United States, are unpacked at an ordnance depot in the Midlands

Lend-lease share of 1942 food supply. A graphic chart issued by the Office of War Information (OWI) showing the percentages of domestic supply of principal foods absorbed by lend-lease shipments

Lend-lease shipments from the United States

Lend-Lease to Britain. An American-made machine gun is unpacked and assembled at an ordnance depot in England, having been shipped from the United States

Waste paper. Waste is an American characteristic. For too many years we have simply thrown things out when we were through with them, without a thought that they might be reused. Here on this garbage scow carrying rubbish for disposal is a huge stock of waste paper, so vitally needed today for conversion into packing paper for defense and lend-lease products

Waste paper. Outdated telephone directories are a good source of the paper packing so badly needed today for shipment of defense and lend-lease goods. This pile of directories is in the stock room of a Philadelphia paper mill, which will make pasteboard packing out of it

One year of reciprocal aid. New Zealand butter in making. Our Army has received 2,032,000 pounds of this staple from New Zealand, under reciprocal lend-lease. Most of the food for the U.S. armed forces stationed in New Zealand including 10,279,000 pounds of beef, 4,787,000 pounds of potatoes, 3,320,000 pounds of sugar, 4,053,000 pounds of bacon, ham and pork, 1,721,000 pounds of mutton and 1,407,000 dozens of eggs, have been received under this arrangement

The Army uses "lend-lease" equipment now being used by British armoured forces, is a "white" scout car which has been converted into an ambulance for use with tanks. It has been proven to have a fine cross-country performance

Ambulances for lend-lease. Red Cross ambulances lined up on a freighter bound for Allied frontiers. They are being sent to the United Nations under lend-lease contracts

Lend-Lease to Britain. English girls, members of the Auxiliary Territorial Service move armfuls of American rifles just arrived from the United States under lend-lease

Lend-Lease to Britain. English workmen handle a case of motor equipment arriving from the United States under lend-lease, at an unpacking bay of an ordnance depot in England

Lend-Lease to Britain. Crates of American radio sets, shipped from the United States as lend-lease arrive at a central ordnance depot in England

Lend-lease to Britain. A "Whirlwind" radial airplane engine on test after assembly at an English ordnance depot, part of a shipment of lend-lease material shipped by the United States

Reciprocal aid. American nurses and officers enjoy themselves in nurses' quarters of a new 3,000,000 dollar hospital "somewhere in Australia" which government of Australia has provided, without payment by the United States, for American servicemen recuperating from wounds and illness. Hospital is one of many Australian contributions under reciprocal lend-lease. Left to right: Miss Bertha Only, Middletown, New York; Major James Hipple, Pierre, South Dakota; Lieutenant R.A. Pearson, Jr., Raleigh, North Carolina; Miss Genevieve Kusek, Danvers, Massachusetts; Captain T.F. Connolly, Sacramento, California; Lieutenant Ray Loper, Cleveland, Oklahoma; Miss Julia Owens, Columbus, Georgia; Lieutenant Edward Ferreri, Connorsville, Indiana; Miss Sera Clifton, Harrington, Delaware

Lend-Lease to Britain. Shipment of 75 mm. guns from the United States as part of a lend-lease shipment reaches an ordnance depot in the English Midlands and are prepared for service

Lend-Lease to Britain. Cases of TNT gunpower shipped from the United States under lend-lease are stacked in the dump in a tunnel one hundred feet underground dug out of solid rock in western England. The staff here works twenty-four hours a day handling Lend-Lease materials arriving from the United States

Lend-lease shipments from the United States. This bow section of an American landing barge will be lifted aboard a waiting freighter for shipment to a United Nations battlefront

Indian industry by lend-lease. A new hydraulic lathe, made available to Indian industry by lend-lease, is hauled by Bangali laborers into a munitions factory in India, where skilled native workmen will take over. This piece of equipment will increase the factory's output by two cannons monthly

Conference held in the office of the Office of Production Management in Washington, D.C. August 19, 1941. Left to right: John Lord O'Brian, General Counsel, Office of Production Management; Edward R. Stettinius, Director of Priorities, OPM; Lord Beaverbrook, British Minister of Supply; William S. Knudsen, Director-General, OPM; W. Averill Harriman, Lend-Lease administrator in London

Edward R Stettinius, Jr., former director, Priorities Division, Office of Production Management (OPM), and currently (September 2, 1941) lend-lease Administrator. Dr. Ernest M. Hopkins, Minerals and Metals Executive of the Priorities Division. President of Dartmouth College

Meeting first American food ship to arrive under lend-lease to Britain. Right to Left: Kathleen Harriman, Lord Woolton, Minister of Food; Averill Harriman, U.S. lend lease representative; Robert H. Hinkley, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Commerce, watching a consignment of food being lifted from the hold of the ship at a British port

Mr. Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., former director, Priorities Division, Office of Production Management (OPM), currently (September 2, 1941) lend-lease administrator

Edward R Stettinius, Jr., former director, Priorities Division, Office of Production Management (OPM), and currently (September 2, 1941) lend-lease Administrator. Dr. Ernest M. Hopkins, Minerals and Metals Executive of the Priorities Division. President of Dartmouth College

Indian industry by lend-lease. Finished show and shells are prepared for delivery from an Indian munitions factory. Skilled Indian workmen, using lend-lease machinery, have increased the shell production of this factory twenty-four times over a pre-war year

The first meeting of the Supply Priorities and Allocations Board, Washington, D.C., September 2, 1941. Seated left to right: Harry L. Hopkins, Special Assistant to the President, supervising lend-lease Program; William S. Knudsen, Director-General of the Office of Production Management (OPM); Henry A. Wallace, Vice President of the United States, and Chairman of the Board; Donald M. Nelson, Executive Director of the Board and Director of the Priorities Division, OPM. Standing, left to right: James V. Forrestal, Undersecretary of the Navy (who was present in place of Secretary Frank Knox, out of town on this day and unable to be present); Robert P. Patterson, Undersecretary of War (sitting in for Secretary of War Stimson, who was unable to attend); Leon Henderson, Administrator, Office of Price Administration (OPA) and Director of the Civilian Supply Division, OPMt; Sidney Hillman, Associate-Director of Labor Division, OPM

Mr. Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., former director, Priorities Division, OPM (Office of Production Management), and currently (Sept. 2, 1941) lend-lease administrator

Edward R Stettinius, Jr., former director, Priorities Division, Office of Production Management (OPM), and currently (September 2, 1941) lend-lease Administrator. Dr. Ernest M. Hopkins, Minerals and Metals Executive of the Priorities Division. President of Dartmouth College

Sappers of the Red army in strongly fortified zone near Leningrad

The first meeting of the Supply Priorities and Allocations Board, Washington, D.C., September 2, 1941. Seated left to right: Harry L. Hopkins, Special Assistant to the President, supervising lend-lease Program; William S. Knudsen, Director-General of the Office of Production Management (OPM); Henry A. Wallace, Vice President of the United States, and Chairman of the Board; Donald M. Nelson, Executive Director of the Board and Director of the Priorities Division, OPM. Standing, left to right: James V. Forrestal, Undersecretary of the Navy (who was present in place of Secretary Frank Knox, out of town on this day and unable to be present); Robert P. Patterson, Undersecretary of War (sitting in for Secretary of War Stimson, who was unable to attend); Leon Henderson, Administrator, Office of Price Administration (OPA) and Director of the Civilian Supply Division, OPMt; Sidney Hillman, Associate-Director of Labor Division, OPM

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A Negro worker tending an electric phosphate smelting furnace which is producing elemental phosphorus at a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphate fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill

Washington, D.C. International youth assembly. Russian delegates with Mrs. Roosevelt

Lagg-3 fighters of the Red air force going into action, 1942-43

Washington, D.C. International youth assembly. Russian delegates with Mrs. Roosevelt and Justice Robert Jackson

Ship launching in Portland, Maine. Stern of a newly completed ship at a New England shipyard, one of five cargo-carrying vessels built for Britain which were christened at a mass launching in New England on August 16, 1942. The five ships were constructed under lend-lease and sent to England immediately upon completion

Ship launching in Portland, Maine. Spectators crowded the docks when Ocean Seaman, one of five lend-lease cargo-carrying ships built for Britain, was christened at a Maine shipyard on August 16, 1942. The vessel was completed forty-eight days after its keel was laid

Victory food from American waters. The crew of Old Glory pulls up a sizeable haul of fish. Almost all of this catch will be filleted and frozen for military and lend-lease shipment

Oil burners to machine gun parts. Painted olive-drab, this oil burner awaits shipment to American armed forces--somewhere in the field. Converted to a large degree to production of precision gun parts, the factory which manufactures these oil burners ships most of them either to the Army or abroad under lend-lease contracts. Reif-Rexoil Company, Buffalo, New York

Washington, D.C. Lord Halifax, British ambassador, chatting with Maxim Litvinoff, Russian ambassador, at a garden party at the New Zealand Legation

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. Don MacDonald, Washington, D.C. typewriter dealer, affixes a decalcomania on a machine turned in to the government by John Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man. This was one of the first typewriters thus enlisted in the war effort. The decalcomania reads: "Property of U.S. Government - severe penalties for unlawful use"

How lend-lease strikes at the Axis. Parts of this twin-engine plane's wings have been removed before the plane is hoisted aboard a ship being loaded at an Atlantic coast port with American arms for one of the United Nations

Sonoma County, California. One of the buildings at winery. This vineyard and winery was established by Russian colonists, later was run by the Japanese, is now being operated by naturalized Germans

[Shoulders charging with the American, British, Chinese, Russian, and French flags in the background. Media: charcoal]

Lend-Lease to Britain. Fitters are at work assembling an American light tank which has just arrived at an English ordnance depot from the United States as part of a lend-lease shipment

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. Section of the TVA's phosphoric acid plant operated in conjunction with the making of elemental phosphorus in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill

Lend-Lease to Britain. Water-cooled machine guns just arrived from the United States under lend-lease are checked at an ordnance depot in England

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A large electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke, and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available, it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A stack in the TVA phosphoric acid plant in the Muscle Shoals area. Phosphoric acid is produced in conjunction with the making of elemental phosphorus. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Major Barayev, Assistant Military Attache, Russian Embassy; Captain Chaudhuri, Military Aide to the Agent General for India

Washington, D.C. Russian war anniversary benefit at the Watergate. Paul Robeson singing

Washington, D.C. Russian war anniversary benefit at the Watergate. Madame Litvinoff, wife of the Russian Ambassador, backstage with Paul Robeson

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Churchill making address over radio while Russian officials look on at Moscow civil airport. Left to right, foreground: Molotov, Churchill, Harriman

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Molotov, Churchill, and Harriman review Russian troops at Moscow civil airport. Note new type of jackets Russian soldiers are wearing

Gloucester, Massachusetts. The crew of "Old Glory" pulls up a sizeable haul of fish. Almost all of this catch will be filleted and frozen for military and lend-lease shipment. Of the total packs in the United States, 60 percent of the salmon and 80 percent of the sardine and mackerel are consumed by the armed forces here and abroad

Ship launching in Portland, Maine. Some of the five British cargo-carrying ships built under lend-lease at a large New England yard and launched along with two destroyers and one liberty ship at a record breaking mass launching August 16, 1942

Ship launching in Portland, Maine. Some of the five British cargo-carrying ships built under lend-lease at a large New England yard and launched along with two destroyers and one liberty ship at a record breaking mass launching on August 16, 1942

Melbourne, Australia. Beaufort torpedo bomber turret sub-assembly plant. Workmen operating an automatic tool machine. Ninety-five per cent of the machinery in this plant was imported under the lend lease program

Melbourne, Australia. Beaufort torpedo bomber rear fuselage and tail sub-assembly plant. Assembling rear fuselages. A high percentage of the jigs and tools were imported under the lend lease arrangement

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Major Barayev, Assistant Military Attache, Russian Embassy; Major Reginald Williams, Military Attache, British Embassy; Major David Li, China Defense Supply

Washington, D.C. The Australian minister, Lord Halifax, and the New Zealand Minister signing a lend-lease agreement

Washington, D.C. The Australian minister, Lord Halifax, and the New Zealand Minister signing a lend-lease agreement

Hartford, Connecticut (vicinity). Mrs. Komorosky in her living room. Stove is for heat in winter, Russian style!

[Four soldiers shaking hands with the American, British, Chinese, and Russian flags in the background.]

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A large electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke, and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available, it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A Negro worker tending an electric phosphate smelting furnace which is producing elemental phosphorus at a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphate fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill

Dehydrated food luncheon at Senate. Chefs in the U.S. Senate restaurant prepare a luncheon of dehydrated foods for members of the Senate. These foods are assuming increasing importance in meeting both military and lend-lease needs