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Launch of the Gemini 5 spacecraft from Pad 19 at 9 a.m. Aug. 21, 1965.

Photograph of a Scientist Driving a Rocket Part to a Launch Pad at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia

Pad 6. Launch of US Army Redstone (2040) for accuracy and vehicle re-entry observation, at 9: 30 P.M. EST. (Lift-off) Photo by: Bundy. LOD-KSC-61C-413

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Launch of Friendship 7, the first manned orbital space flight. Astronaut John Glenn aboard, the Mercury-Atlas rocket is launched from Pad 14. Photo credit: NASA KSC-62PC-0009

The Atlas-Agena B space Vehicle waits on the launch pad to launch the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Ranger V Spacecraft on a 66 – 62 hour journey to the moon. Ranger V is a 735-pound gold and chrome Plated payload designed to perform a series of complicated tasks, including taking television pictures of the lunar surface. 62P-165

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Pad 34 exterior, blockhouse and gantry. Photo credit: NASA KSC-PL63C-18124

A view of the 363-foot high Saturn V launch vehicle that will carry Apollo 8 astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell and William Anders into space. The launch vehicle is being moved from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad A, Complex 39. Apollo 8, scheduled for launch in December, will be the first manned Saturn V flight

Ground-Level View - Apollo VIII Space Vehicle - Pad "A" - Launch Complex (LC)-38 - Cape

Aerial View - Apollo VIII Space Vehicle - Pad "A" - Launch Complex (LC)-38 - Cape

The first manned Apollo mission - Apollo 8 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 8 Astronaut and commander Frank Borman

Nighttime view of Apollo 9 space vehicle at Pad A, Launch Complex 39

Aerial view of Launch Complex 39 showing Apollo 10 on way to Pad B

Aerial view of Launch Complex 39, KSC showing Apollo 10 on way to Pad B

Aerial, high-angle view of Apollo 10 on Pad B, Launch Complex 39, KSC

Nighttime view of Apollo 10 space vehicle on Pad B, Launch Complex 39

Aerial, high-angle view of Apollo 10 on Pad B, Launch Complex 39, KSC

APOLLO X - LAUNCH - PAD 39B - KSC

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The 402-foot-tall mobile service structure is moved away from the Apollo 11 spacecraft at Launch Pad 39A. The move was made during a recent Countdown Demonstration Test, participated in by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. KSC-69PC-353

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins appears to be explaining a point about his spacesuit glove to technician Joe Schmitt during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff for the first manned lunar landing. KSC-69PC-373

Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong is looking over flight plans while being assisted by a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission ksc-69pc-376

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Vice President Spiro Agnew [right center] and Former President Lyndon Johnson (left center] view the liftoff of Apollo 11 from the stands located at the Kennedy Space Center VIP viewing site. The two political figures were at the Kennedy Space Center to witness the launch of the first Manned Lunar Landing mission which took place from Pad 39A at 9:32 a.m. EDT. ksc-69pc-379

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle, at Launch Pad 39A, awaits the liftoff scheduled for 9:32 a.m. EDT today, along with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. During the planned eight-day mission, Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in a lunar module to the Moon's surface while Collins orbits overhead in the command module. The two astronauts are to spend 22 hours on the Moon, including two and one-half hours outside the lunar module. They will gather samples of lunar material and will deploy scientific experiments which will transmit data about the lunar environment. They will rejoin Collins the command module for the return trip to Earth ksc-69pc-443

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Personnel within the Launch Control Center watch the Apollo 11 liftoff from Launch Complex 39A today at the start of the historic lunar landing mission. The LCC is located three-and-one-half miles from the launch pad. KSC-69PC-387

Personnel within the Launch Control Center watch the Apollo 11 liftoff from Launch Complex 39A today at the start of the historic lunar landing mission. The LCC is located three and one-half miles from the launch pad. KSC-69PC-0387

Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong prepares to put on his helmet with the assistance of a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission ksc-69pc-377

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. is being assisted by a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff for the first manned lunar landing mission. KSC-69PC-381

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. appears to be relaxed during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission ksc-69pc-382

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Liftoff of Apollo 11 from Launch Pad 39A with astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin Jr. and Miichael Collins onboard. KSC-69P-446

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Apollo 12 crew walks to the launch pad Nov. 14, 1969, for launch on their mission. Photo credit: NASA KSC-69PC-0663

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Apollo 15 crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center before climbing into the Astrovan for the ride out to the launch pad for their flight to the moon. Photo credit: NASA KSC-71PC-569

Apollo 14 crew arrive at White Room atop Pad A, Launch Complex 39

View of Apollo 15 space vehicle leaving VAB to Pad A, Launch Complex 39

View of Apollo 15 space vehicle on way from VAB to Pad A, Launch Complex 39

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 15's Saturn V rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 9:34 a.m., EDT, July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Aboard the Apollo 15 spacecraft are astronauts David R. Scott, commander, Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. While Apollo 15 astronauts Scott and Irwin will descend in the lunar module to explore the moon's Hadley-Apennine region, astronaut Worden will remain in lunar orbit with the command module. For more information, visit http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/history/apollo/apollo-15/apollo-15.htm Photo credit: NASA KSC-71PC-0685

View of Apollo 16 space vehicle on way from VAB to Pad A, Launch Complex 39

View of Apollo 16 space vehicle on way from VAB to Pad A, Launch Complex 39

View of Apollo 16 space vehicle at Pad A, Launch Complex 39

Apollo 17 - Saturn Apollo Program

Floodlights illuminate view of Skylab 3 vehicle at Pad B, Launch Complex 39

View of launch Pad B, Launch Complex 39 on morning of launch

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the shuttle service and access tower SSAT, left, is assembled at Launch Complex 39A from sections of launch umbilical tower 3. The lower 180 feet of the old ML-3 will be topped by the former uppermost section on which a hammerhead crane will be installed and the next lower section which houses the intact ML-3 elevator room and equipment. The SSAT will anchor and support a hinge column to the Payload Changeout Room PCR which will travel on a rail in a specified area to enclose the space shuttle's cargo bay on the pad for installation or removal of payloads. Mobile Launcher 2, center right, is on the pad to support the PCR during construction. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-76PC-0541

The space shuttle Columbia and its rockets move toward the launch pad aboard the portable launch platform

The space shuttle Columbia and its rockets move toward the launch pad aboard the portable launch platform

SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER ENTERPRISE MATED TO AN EXTERNAL FUEL TANK AND TWO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ON TOP OF A MOBIL LAUNCHER PLATFORM, UNDERGOES FIT AND FUNCTION CHECKS AT THE LAUNCH SITE FOR THE FIRST SPACE SHUTTLE AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 39'S PAD A. THE DUMMY SPACE SHUTTLE WAS ASSEMBLED IN THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AND ROLLED OUT TO THE LAUNCH SITE ON MAY 1 AS PART OF AN EXERCISE TO MAKE CERTAIN SHUTTLE ELEMENTS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SPACEPORT'S ASSEMBLY AND LAUNCH FACILITIES AND GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND HELP CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-17

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise mated to an external fuel tank and two solid rocket boosters on top of a Mobil Launcher Platform, undergoes fit and function checks at the launch site for the first Space Shuttle at Launch Complex 39's Pad A. The dummy Space Shuttle was assembled in the Vehicle Assembly Building and rolled out to the launch site on May 1 as part of an exercise to make certain shuttle elements are compatible with the Spaceport's assembly and launch facilities and ground support equipment, and help clear the way for the launch of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-19

SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER ENTERPRISE MATED TO AN EXTERNAL FUEL TANK AND TWO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ON TOP OF A MOBIL LAUNCHER PLATFORM, UNDERGOES FIT AND FUNCTION CHECKS AT THE LAUNCH SITE FOR THE FIRST SPACE SHUTTLE AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 39'S PAD A. THE DUMMY SPACE SHUTTLE WAS ASSEMBLED IN THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AND ROLLED OUT TO THE LAUNCH SITE ON MAY 1 AS PART OF AN EXERCISE TO MAKE CERTAIN SHUTTLE ELEMENTS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SPACEPORT'S ASSEMBLY AND LAUNCH FACILITIES AND GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND HELP CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA. ARC-1980-AC80-0107-14

A view of the launch pad for the space shuttle Columbia at the Kennedy Space Center

A view of a launch pad rolling track in the Space Transportation System (STS) under construction

A night view of the Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39. The shuttle is being prepared for its first flight

A night view of the Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39. The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

The Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia aboard the mobile launcher platform as it arrives at Launch Pad 39 at dusk. The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

The Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39. The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

The Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia is being moved on the mobile launcher platform from the vehicle assembly building (VAB) to Launch Pad 39 before its first flight

The Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia aboard the mobile launcher platform as it arrives at Launch Pad 39 after leaving the vehicle assembly building (VAB). The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

The Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia, with access arms in place, at Launch Pad 39. The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

AN aerial view of the Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia aboard the mobile launcher platform (MLP) as it leaves the vehicle assembly building (VAB) and heads toward Launch Pad 39. The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

AN aerial view of the Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle Columbia aboard the mobile launcher platform (MLP) as it leaves the vehicle assembly building (VAB) and heads toward Launch Pad 39. The shuttle is undergoing preparations prior to its maiden flight

KENNEDY SPACE CENER, FLA. -- A timed exposure of the Space Shuttle at Launch Pad A, Complex 39, turns the space vehicle and support facilities into a night-time fantasy of light. To the left of the Shuttle are the fixed and the rotating service structures ksc-81pc-137

A timed exposure of the first Space Shuttle, STS-1, at Launch Pad A, Complex 39, turns the space vehicle and support facilities into a night-time fantasy of light. To the left of the Shuttle are the fixed and the rotating service structures. KSC-81PC-0136

The space shuttle orbiter Columbia lifts off the launch pad during the first space transportation system test mission

The space shuttle Columbia lifts off from the launch pad for its first mission into space. Astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen are aboard to test the shuttle's systems and to land the shuttle like an airplane at Edwards Air Force Base, California

View of a BQM-34-S Firebee drone on the launch pad, as seen looking out over a control panel in a block house

An air-to-air view of an SH-3 Sea King helicopter airlifting a Firebee target drone back to the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando. The helicopter is assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 5 (VC-5)

A air-to-air view of an SH-3 Sea King helicopter airlifting a Firebee target drone back to the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando. The helicopter is assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 5 (VC-5)

A ground-to-air left side view of an SH-3 King helicopter airlifting a Firebee target drone back to the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando. The helicopter is assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 5 (VC-5)

A view of a Firebee target drone on the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando, from inside the blockhouse

An air-to-air right side view of an SH-3 Sea King helicopter airlifting a Firebee target drone back to the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando. The helicopter is assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 5 (VC-5)

A ground-to-air view of an SH-3 Sea King helicopter airlifting a Firebee target drone back to the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando. The helicopter is assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 5 (VC-5)

A Firebee drone takes off from the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando

An air-to-air view of an SH-3 Sea King helicopter airlifting a Firebee target drone back to the launch pad at Wallace Air Station, Poro Point, San Fernando. The helicopter is assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 5 (VC-5)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - STS-3 on Launch Pad 39A with searchlights during loading tests. Photo credit: NASA KSC-82PC-0247

Columbia is cheered on its way by distinguished guests viewing the launch from the Schwartz Road VIP site, located about five miles from the launch pad. About 4,500 invited visitors at the site watched the 11 a.m. liftoff of Columbia on its third orbital flight. KSC-82PC-0299

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - STS-4 thunders away from Launch Pad 39A at 10:59:59 a.m. EDT, bound for a seven-day Earth orbital mission and the final developmental flight for the Space Transportation System. The fourth Space Shuttle mission is piloted by Commander Ken Mattingly and Pilot Henry Hartsfield Jr. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-82PC-0669

Artwork: "To the Launch Pad in a Fog" Artist: Lee Ann Geiger U.S. Air Force Art Collection

An MGM-31A Pershing 1a missile is fired from a launch pad at the McGregor Range by members of the German air force

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure has pulled back to the prelaunch position, the shuttle Challenger sits at Launch Pad 39-A bathed in billion candlepower searchlights ready to embark on it fourth space mission STS-41B, the 10th flight of the space shuttle. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-84PC-0080

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39-A, the school bus-sized Long Duration Exposure Facility LDEF containing 57 active and passive experiments from nine nations has been loaded into the payload bay of the space shuttle Challenger. The view from the Payload Change-out Room shows LDEF which will be deployed in orbit at an altitude of nearly 300 miles and retrieved after nearly a year so that the experimenters may analyze the effects of long term exposure to space on various substances and processes. The five-member STS-41C crew for this flight is headed by veteran astronaut Robert Crippen on his third space shuttle flight, and includes space rookies, pilot Dick Scobee and mission specialists Terry Hart, George Nelson and James van Hoften. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-84PC-0219

STS 41-C crew move to transfer van for trip to Launch Pad 39B

Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (OV-103) scheduled to lift off at 8:43 a.m. on mission 41-D, waits on the launch pad for the countdown to resume. The ignition sequence was halted at T minus four seconds by onboard computers when the No. 3 engine failed to achieve internal ignition

A Delta launch vehicle carrying an active magnetospheric particle tracer explorer satellite lifts off from the launch pad 17A at the Kennedy Space Center

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, The space shuttle Discovery lifts off from Launch Pad 39A for its maiden flight at 8:42 a.m. EDT. The crew members for the 41-D flight are commander Henry w. Hartsfield, pilot Michael L. Coats, mission specialists Judith A. Resnik, Steven A. Hawley, Richard M. Mullane, and payload specialist Charles W. Walker. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-84PC-0468

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Two majestic birds prepare for flight at Launch Complex 39 moments before the launch of Discovery on its maiden voyage. A great blue heron was startled from its perch in a lagoon south of pad A. Mission 41D was launched at 8:41 a.m. with a crew of six persons and a cargo of three satellites to be deployed. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-84PC-0471

View of the shuttle Discovery on the launch pad just prior to STS 51-D launch

View of the shuttle Discovery on the launch pad just prior to STS 51-D launch

Artist's concept of a Soviet anti-satellite interceptor on a launch pad. From Soviet Military Power 1985

The space shuttle Challenger lifts off from the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center. Note: First view in a series of eight

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Kennedy Space Center Director Lt. Gen. Forrest S. McCartney, far right, stands in front of the space shuttle Atlantis the morning after it is rolled out to Launch Pad 39B. Standing with McCartney is, from right to left, Bob Sieck, director of Shuttle Management and Operations, Bill Warren, pad site manager, and Gene Thomas, director of Launch and Landing Operations. Photo credit: NASA KSC-86PC-0310

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the paylaod fairing of the Delta 182 launch vehicle is carefully moved into place as encapsulation procedures continue on the Palapa B2-P communications satellite at Launch Complex 17, Pad B. Palapa is scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral for the government of Indonesia. Liftoff of Delta 182 and Palapa is scheduled for March 20. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-87PC-0266

A Trident II (D-5X2) intercontinental ballistic missile clears a launch pad during the second developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Second view in a series of three

A Trident II (D-5X2) intercontinental ballistic missile clears a launch pad during the second developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: First view in a series of three

A Trident II (D-5X2) intercontinental ballistic missile clears a launch pad during the second developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Third view in a series of three

A Trident II (D-5X4) intercontinental ballistic missile clears the launch pad during the fourth developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Fourth view in a series of seven

A Trident II (D-5X4) intercontinental ballistic missile clears the launch pad during the fourth developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Sixth view in a series of seven

A Trident II (D-5X4) intercontinental ballistic missile clears the launch pad during the fourth developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Third view in a series of seven

A Trident II (D-5X4) intercontinental ballistic missile clears the launch pad during the fourth developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Seventh view in a series of seven

A Trident II (D-5X4) intercontinental ballistic missile clears the launch pad during the fourth developmental test flight of the system. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734) and all subsequent submarines in its class. Note: Fifth view in a series of seven

A Trident II (D-5) missile clears the launch pad during a US Navy developmental test flight. The missile is designed for submerged firing from the ninth nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, USS TENNESSEE (SSBN 734). The first eight Ohio class ballistic missile submarines will be backfitted to carry the Trident II missile in accodance with regularly scheduled shipyard availability. Note: Seventh view in a series of seven