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Space capsule apollo program lander, science technology.

Space capsule apollo program lander, science technology.

map from "The Travels of Richard and John Lander ... for the discovery of the course ... of the Niger, from unpublished documents in the possession of the late J. W. Barber Fullerton, with a prefatory analysis of the previous travels of Park, Denham, Clapperton, Adams, Lyon, Ritchie, etc. into the hitherto unexplored countries of Africa"

map from "The Travels of Richard and John Lander ... for the discovery of the course ... of the Niger, from unpublished documents in the possession of the late J. W. Barber Fullerton, with a prefatory analysis of the previous travels of Park, Denham, Clapperton, Adams, Lyon, Ritchie, etc. into the hitherto unexplored countries of Africa"

Design of an electrical clock [of Souire Lander & Co. - advertisement]

Design of an electrical clock [of Souire Lander & Co. - advertisement]

[Jean M. Lander, half-length portrait, seated]

[Jean M. Lander, half-length portrait, seated]

[Mr. Lander's Sprague cottage.]

[Mr. Lander's Sprague cottage.]

[Mr. Lander's Sprague cottage.]

[Mr. Lander's Sprague cottage.]

Near Last Camp on Ross Fork, Snake River, Lander Wagon Road, Oregon

Near Last Camp on Ross Fork, Snake River, Lander Wagon Road, Oregon

Lander

Lander

Lander

Lander

Col. (?) Lander

Col. (?) Lander

Col. (?) Lander

Col. (?) Lander

Col. (?) Lander

Col. (?) Lander

Lander

Lander

Brigadier General Lander

Brigadier General Lander

Daring ride [on horseback] of Colonel Lander at the Battle of Philippi [W. Va June 3, 1861]

Daring ride [on horseback] of Colonel Lander at the Battle of Philippi [W. Va June 3, 1861]

Simon F. Barstow to George B. McClellan, Sunday, March 02, 1862 (Telegram reporting death of Gen. Lander)

Simon F. Barstow to George B. McClellan, Sunday, March 02, 1862  (Telegram reporting death of Gen. Lander)

Frederick W. Lander to George B. McClellan, Thursday, February 06, 1862 (Military affairs)

Frederick W. Lander to George B. McClellan, Thursday, February 06, 1862  (Military affairs)

Frederick W. Lander to Seth Williams, Thursday, February 06, 1862 (Telegram regarding military affairs)

Frederick W. Lander to Seth Williams, Thursday, February 06, 1862  (Telegram regarding military affairs)

Ramey, Lander - State: Virginia - Year: 1865

Ramey, Lander - State: Virginia - Year: 1865

Polar - Karte : enthaltend, die Lander V. Meere vom Nord - Pol bis 50 N. Br. V Weiter, sowie Ubersicht des Russischen Reichs< : [Karte]

Polar - Karte : enthaltend, die Lander V. Meere vom Nord - Pol bis 50 N. Br. V Weiter, sowie Ubersicht des Russischen Reichs< : [Karte]

Queens V. 6, Plate No. 109 [Map bounded by Lott Lane, Lander, Pershing Crescent, Elpis]

Queens V. 6, Plate No. 109 [Map bounded by Lott Lane, Lander, Pershing Crescent, Elpis]

Queens V. 6, Plate No. 15 [Map bounded by Grand Central Parkway, Smedley, 84th Rd., Lander]

Queens V. 6, Plate No. 15 [Map bounded by Grand Central Parkway, Smedley, 84th Rd., Lander]

Henrietta Lander, from the Actors and Actresses series (N45, Type 8) for Virginia Brights Cigarettes

Henrietta Lander, from the Actors and Actresses series (N45, Type 8) for Virginia Brights Cigarettes

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Little Mary Lander

Wills, Lander T - 13th Cavalry

Wills, Lander T - 13th Cavalry

Robertson, Lander - Age [Blank], Year: [Blank] - Nineteenth Infantry, Ph - Sn - Louisiana

Robertson, Lander - Age [Blank], Year: [Blank] - Nineteenth Infantry, Ph - Sn - Louisiana

Desert. Lander County, Nevada

Desert. Lander County, Nevada

Road through desert. Lander County, Nevada

Road through desert. Lander County, Nevada

New Britain, Connecticut. Women at the Lander, Frary and Clark plant. Processing cores, to be used by the Army for making molds for meat choppers

New Britain, Connecticut. Women at the Lander, Frary and Clark plant. Processing cores, to be used by the Army for making molds for meat choppers

New Britain, Connecticut. Hot cores under a cooling ventilator in the Lander, Frary and Clark plant

New Britain, Connecticut. Hot cores under a cooling ventilator in the Lander, Frary and Clark plant

New Britain, Connecticut. Hot cores under a cooling ventilator in the Lander, Frary and Clark plant

New Britain, Connecticut. Hot cores under a cooling ventilator in the Lander, Frary and Clark plant

Propane bubble chamber with Warren Chupp and Dick Lander taken September 19, 1957. Morgue 1957-7 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Propane bubble chamber with Warren Chupp and Dick Lander taken September 19, 1957. Morgue 1957-7 (P-1) [Photographer: Donald Cooksey]

Dr H. 'Chuck' Klein (l) with Dr R. Young looking into the Mars box (simulator), which simulated the environment of Mars for the preparation of life sciences experiments for the Viking lander. ARC-1963-A-31494

Dr H. 'Chuck' Klein (l) with Dr R. Young  looking into the Mars box (simulator), which simulated the environment of Mars for the preparation of life sciences experiments for the Viking lander. ARC-1963-A-31494

Viking 1 Launch

Viking 1 Launch

APOLLO 11 - EARTH AND LUNAR LANDER

APOLLO 11 - EARTH AND LUNAR LANDER

Pioneer Historic Byway - On the Lander Cutoff of the Oregon Trail

Pioneer Historic Byway - On the Lander Cutoff of the Oregon Trail

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jet Propulsion Laboratory technicians are closing up the metal "petals" of the Mars Pathfinder lander. The Sojourner rover is visible on one of the three petals. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-96PC-1130

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jet Propulsion Laboratory technicians are closing up the metal "petals" of the Mars Pathfinder lander. The Sojourner rover is visible on one of the three petals. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-96PC-1130

Debris Kicked Up By Impact of A Protective Cover from Viking Lander 1

Debris Kicked Up By Impact of A Protective Cover from Viking Lander 1

High Resolution Image From Viking Lander 1

High Resolution Image From Viking Lander 1

Viking Lander Buried Footpad #3

Viking Lander Buried Footpad #3

The Meteorology Instrument on Viking Lander 1

The Meteorology Instrument on Viking Lander 1

The Collector Head Of Viking Lander 1 Surface Sampler

The Collector Head Of Viking Lander 1 Surface Sampler

Viking Lander 2 First Picture On The Surface Of Mars

Viking Lander 2 First Picture On The Surface Of Mars

First Color Image From Viking Lander 1

First Color Image From Viking Lander 1

Vivid Colors of the Viking Lander 1 Scene

Vivid Colors of the Viking Lander 1 Scene

Viking Lander 1 U.S. Flag on Mars Surface

Viking Lander 1 U.S. Flag on Mars Surface

Sunset at the Viking Lander 1 Site

Sunset at the Viking Lander 1 Site

First Color Image of the Viking Lander 2 Site

First Color Image of the Viking Lander 2 Site

Frost at the Viking Lander 2 Site

Frost at the Viking Lander 2 Site

Lander, Airbags, & Martian Terrain

Lander, Airbags, & Martian Terrain

Sojourner View of the Lander

Sojourner View of the Lander

A Rover-eye view of the Lander

A Rover-eye view of the Lander

Lander Petal & Twin Peaks - 3-D

Lander Petal & Twin Peaks - 3-D

Looking Westward at the Lander

Looking Westward at the Lander

Lander and Mini

Lander and Mini

Rover Camera Mosaic of Lander & Wedge

Rover Camera Mosaic of Lander & Wedge

MPF Lander Measured Surface Pressure

MPF Lander Measured Surface Pressure

MPF Lander Measured Surface Pressure

MPF Lander Measured Surface Pressure

Northeast View from Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

Northeast View from Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

Northeast View from Pathfinder Lander

Northeast View from Pathfinder Lander

Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander

Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander

Sojourner Rover View of Pathfinder Lander

Sojourner Rover View of Pathfinder Lander

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved onto a flatbed for transport to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). It arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1047

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved onto a flatbed for transport to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). It arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1047

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved into the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) in KSC's industrial area. It arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1048

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved into the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) in KSC's industrial area. It arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1048

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When the spacecraft arrives at the red planet, it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1046

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When the spacecraft arrives at the red planet, it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1046

Technicians in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) prepare a lifting device they will use to remove the Mars Climate Orbiter from its container (behind the workers). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1078

Technicians in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) prepare a lifting device they will use to remove the Mars Climate Orbiter from its container (behind the workers). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1078

Technicians carefully maneuver the Mars Climate Orbiter toward its workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1082

Technicians carefully maneuver the Mars Climate Orbiter toward its workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1082

Technicians check the connections on the workstand holding the Mars Climate Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1085

Technicians check the connections on the workstand holding the Mars Climate Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1085

Technicians lower the Mars Climate Orbiter onto its workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1083

Technicians lower the Mars Climate Orbiter onto its workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1083

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Climate Orbiter (background) is moved toward the workstand being readied by technicians (foreground). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1081

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Climate Orbiter (background) is moved toward the workstand being readied by technicians (foreground). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1081

The Mars Climate Orbiter is lifted clear of the top of its container in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1080

The Mars Climate Orbiter is lifted clear of the top of its container in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1080

Technicians in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) oversee the removal of the Mars Climate Orbiter from its container. The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1079

Technicians in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) oversee the removal of the Mars Climate Orbiter from its container. The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1079

Technicians check the connections on the workstand holding the Mars Climate Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1084

Technicians check the connections on the workstand holding the Mars Climate Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1084

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is rolled from the Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is rolled from the Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is loaded onto a truck after its flight aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The lander is being transported to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2(SAEF-2) in the KSC Industrial Area for testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is planned for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999 KSC-98pc1196

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is loaded onto a truck after its flight aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The lander is being transported to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2(SAEF-2) in the KSC Industrial Area for testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is planned for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999 KSC-98pc1196

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Mars Polar Lander is uncrated in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1210

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Mars Polar Lander is uncrated in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1210

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --Out of its crate, the Mars Polar Lander is maneuvered inside the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) for testing. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1211

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --Out of its crate, the Mars Polar Lander is maneuvered inside the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) for testing. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1211

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Mars Polar Lander awaits testing in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1212

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Mars Polar Lander awaits testing in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1212

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is secured on a portable stand. The Lander will undergo testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems, before its launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1234

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is secured on a portable stand. The Lander will undergo testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems, before its launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1234

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is removed to prepare the Lander for testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1229

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --  In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is removed to prepare the Lander for testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1229

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is lowered onto a portable stand. The Lander will undergo testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems, before its launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1233

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is lowered onto a portable stand. The Lander will undergo testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems, before its launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1233

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is removed for testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1230

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is removed for testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1230

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), a technician begins testing on the Mars Polar Lander. The checkout includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1235

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), a technician begins testing on the Mars Polar Lander. The checkout includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1235

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Polar Lander is secured on a workstand for testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1231

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Polar Lander is secured on a workstand for testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1231

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the protective covering for the Mars Polar Lander is removed so technicians can prepare the Lander for testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1236

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the protective covering for the Mars Polar Lander is removed so technicians can prepare the Lander for testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1236

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is swung out of the way before testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1232

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the top of the Mars Polar Lander is swung out of the way before testing, which includes a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1232

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), technicians check underneath the Mars Polar Lander during the testing of science instruments. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1339

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), technicians check underneath the Mars Polar Lander during the testing of science instruments. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1339

KENNEDY SPACE CENTE, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), a technician tests the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems on the Mars Polar Lander. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1338

KENNEDY SPACE CENTE, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), a technician tests the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems on the Mars Polar Lander. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1338

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), technicians test the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems on the Mars Polar Lander. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1337

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), technicians test the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems on the Mars Polar Lander. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1337

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Climate Orbiter is on display for the media. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, aboard a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket. The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface KSC-98pc1350

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Climate Orbiter is on display for the media. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, aboard a Boeing Delta II 7425 rocket. The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface KSC-98pc1350

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is on display for the media, showing an almost fully installed set of components for its launch planned for Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1353

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is on display for the media, showing an almost fully installed set of components for its launch planned for Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1353

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Climate Orbiter (foreground) and the Mars Polar Lander are on display for the media. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. It is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface KSC-98pc1352

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Climate Orbiter (foreground) and the Mars Polar Lander are on display for the media. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. It is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface KSC-98pc1352

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the camera takes a close look at the Mars Polar Lander. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1349

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), the camera takes a close look at the Mars Polar Lander. The solar-powered spacecraft is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. It is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1349

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), a technician works on the Mars Climate Orbiter which is scheduled to launch on Dec. 10, 1998, aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface KSC-98pc1351

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), a technician works on the Mars Climate Orbiter which is scheduled to launch on Dec. 10, 1998, aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. The Mars Climate Orbiter is heading for Mars where it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface KSC-98pc1351