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U.S. Reports: Maxwell v. Griswold et al., 51 U.S. (10 How.) 242 (1851)

U.S. Reports: Greely v. Thompson et al., 51 U.S. (10 How.) 225 (1851)

U.S. Reports: United States v. Shrewsbury, 90 U.S. (23 Wall.) 508 (1874)

U.S. Reports: Sweeney v. United States, 109 U.S. 618 (1883)

Last inspections of Co. H, 9th Cavalry before leaving for China, San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A.

A criminal combine not confined to Chicago / Ehrhart.

The thread of life / Keppler.

Always look a gift-horse in the mouth / K.

Pickings from Puck's vineyard / Hy Mayer.

Capt. Napier inspecting feet of soldiers after days hike near San Antonio. Mexican-U.S. campaign after Villa

Colleges and Universities - Cornell University - Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. R.O.T.C. Pack inspections

Airplanes - Inspection - Propellor table - airplane inspections

Army truck manufacture (Dodge). General view of various types of U.S. Army trucks in the large field at the Dodge Lynch Road plant at Detroit, where they are held for various inspections and adjustments before being delivered to the War Department

United States Code: Inspection of Steam Vessels, 46 U.S.C. §§ 361-487 (Suppl. 5 1940)

Two Blue Angel Pilots during Preflight Inspections at Pensacola Naval Air Station

A bogy assembly for an Army halftrac scout car takes shape on the production line of an Ohio truck plant. When it's completed it must be able to stand rigid inspections. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

Inspections on innards in the pork department. Packing plant, Austin, Minnesota

Careful plant inspections assure that each new Army scout car is correct in every detail before it leaves the production line of a large Midwest truck plant. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

A halftrac scout car must show a clean bill of health before the manufacturer turns it over to the Army. Endless inspections of parts and assemblies are made before final inspection of the complete vehicles. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

Defense housing, Erie, Pennsylvania. Each defense trailer is located on a plot of ground 25 x 50 feet, assuring a fine degree of privacy and room for children to play. Standards set up by the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) Division of Defense Housing for trailers provide a minimum overall length and width to assure the least possible crowding. The trailers are protected from fire and the city's fire bureau regularly conducts inspections. Manager Ackerman and the Lawrence Park Commissioners see to it that the trailer camp is well policed

A fire in a defense production plant may blot out American fighting equipment faster than enemy shell fire can do it. In plants producing war materials fire wardens make continual painstaking inspections to insure against losses and delays from fires. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

Production. Lockheed P-38 pursuit planes. Another new Lockheed P-38 pursuit ship leaves the main assembly line of a large Western aircraft plant. The station stand has been swept clear and the ship is being lowered away to rest on its own wheels. From here it will be rolled to a test field where propellers will be installed. If trial flights and final inspections prove it satisfactory, the ship will be delivered to the Army

Production. Pratt and Whitney airplane engines. Single-row piston rods for Pratt and Whitney airplane engines are cleaned and inspected in a large Eastern plant. These important detail jobs are only a few of a series of systematic inspections. Pratt and Whitney Aircraft

Production. Lockheed P-38 pursuit planes. New Lockheed P-38 pursuit ships receive final inspections and adjustments on assembly lines outside a large Western aircraft plant. After these operations, the ships will be taken out for routine test flights. If the flights prove satisfactory, the new planes will be ready for delivery to the Army

Conversion. Beverage containers to aviation oxygen cylinders. Before completion of the fourth and final welding operation in the manufacture of shatterproof oxygen cylinders for high altitude flying, all straps are subjected to physical tests to determine the strength of the weld. Occasional radiographic inspections are made to insure the quality of workmanship and materials after the atomic welding machine has brought the two halves of the cylinder together and made into one unit. The operator, looking through a specially designed dark safety glass, rotates the shell by sight to insure a perfect and uniform union of the two halves. Firestone, Akron, Ohio

Production. Airplane propellers. Arthur Voss checks angles and makes final dimensional inspections of a propeller blade for an American warplane at the Hartford, Connecticut, plant. This blade will later be mounted with others in a hydromatic mechanism that will permit adjustment of pitch while planes are in action

Production. Airplane propellers. Propeller blades that will soon be driving American warplanes are stored after final dimensional inspections at a Hartford, Connecticut, plant. The various blades will later be mounted, in sets of two, three, and four in the mechanism that will permit adjustment of pitch while planes are in action

Production. Pratt and Whitney airplane engines. Careful inspections between honings assure compliance with rigid standards in making the master piston rods for Pratt and Whitney airplane engines. The superior performance of the engines, in which rods like this are used, depends upon faithful adherence to specifications. Pratt and Whitney Aircraft

Production. B-24E (Liberator) bombers at Willow Run. Final touch-ups and inspections are made on a new B-24E (Liberator) bomber after it has received a paint job at Ford's big Willow Run plant. The Liberator is capable of operation at high altitudes and over great ranges on precision bombing missions. It has proved itself an excellent performer in the Pacific, in Northern Africa, Europe and the Aleutians. Ford's Willow Run Plant, Michigan

Production. Lockheed P-38 pursuit planes. New Lockheed P-38 pursuit ships receive final inspections and adjustments on assembly lines outside a large Western aircraft plant. After these operations, the ships will be taken out for routine test flights. If the flights prove satisfactory, the new planes will be ready for delivery to the Army

Conversion. Beverage containers to aviation oxygen cylinders. Before completion of the fourth and final welding operation in the manufacture of shatterproof oxygen cylinders for high altitude flying, all straps are subjected to physical tests to determine the strength of the weld. Occasional radiographic inspections are made to insure the quality of workmanship after the two halves of the cylinder are brought together in this atomic welding machine and made one unit. Here, the operator has just completed the union and is about to remove the whole cylinder. Firestone, Akron, Ohio

Production. Airplane propellers. Frank Geary uses an electro-limit gauge at a Hartford, Connecticut, plant to make final inspections of a three-way hydromatic spider that form part of the mechanism which varies the pitch of airplane propeller blades while planes are in action. At this plant propellers are made with combinations of two, three and four blades

Naval air base, Corpus Christi, Texas. M.M. Bremer, A.M.M, 2nd Class, keeps planes in first class condition at the naval air base in Corpus Christi, Texas. Every plane in use at the base is subjected to frequent and minute inspections by sailors such as this one

Production. Lockheed P-38 pursuit planes. New Lockheed P-38 pursuit ships receive final inspections and adjustments on assembly lines outside a large Western aircraft plant. After these operations, the ships will be taken out for routine test flights. If the flights prove satisfactory, the new planes will be ready for delivery to the Army

Chicago, Illinois. Rear brakeman checking air in each car as part of his inspections before a Chicago and Northwestern Railroad train pulls out

Chicago, Illinois. Rear brakeman checking air in each car as part of his inspections before a Chicago and Northwestern Railroad train pulls out

Photograph of Forest Ranger H. O. Nixon Inspecting a Sale Area

Photograph of Forest Ranger Ferris Green at Aspen Sale on Lakewood District

Photograph of Checking Large Top Left in Timber Sale

Photograph of District Ranger Harley Hamm Talking with Ed Rogstall

United States Code: Inspection of Steam Vessels, 46 U.S.C. §§ 362-445 (Suppl. 5 1964)

Photograph of Forester and Timber Operator

Photograph of Forester and Timber Operator

Members of the 436th Military Airlift Wing, dressed in chemical warfare gear, go over their checklist after the inspections are completed during a chemical warfare defense equipment test

United States Code: Carriage of Animals, 46 U.S.C. §§ 3901-3902 (Suppl. 5 1982)

United States Code: Load Lines for American Vessels, 46a U.S.C. §§ 86-88i (Suppl. 2 1982)

Three F-14A Tomcat aircraft are given preflight inspections while parked near the stern of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69). The two aircraft at right are from Fighter Squadron 143 (VF-143) and the aircraft at left is from Fighter Squadron 142 (VF-142)

Technicians use sanders to prepare aircraft parts for painting. Aircraft inspections and repairs are made quickly and more efficiently due to the implementation of the Strategic Air Command's Readiness Oriented Logistics System, a program which consolidat

A maintenance specialist installs a patch plate on a 509th Bombardment Wing F-111 aircraft. Aircraft inspections and repairs are made quickly and more efficiently due to the implementation of the Strategic Air Command's Readiness Oriented Logistics System

United States Code: Uninspected Vessels Generally, 46 U.S.C. § 4104 (Suppl. 3 1988)

A crew member from the 42nd Electronic Combat Squadron does preflight inspections on an EF-111A Raven aircraft inside a shelter. The aircraft is one of four EF-111As being deployed to Turkey in support of Operation Provide Comfort

STAFF SGT. Jason Stenklyft, a C-141 hydraulic system specialist with the 446th Airlift Wing Rodeo 92 team, performing preflight inspections on his team's aircraft during the first day of competition. The 446th is an Air Force Reserve Associate Wing based at McChord Air Force Base, Wash

A1C Charles Anderson, a strategic aircraft maintenance specialist assigned to March Air Force Base, Calif., talking to the crew of a KC-10 Extender during preflight inspections prior to a RODEO 92 tanker competition mission

Third phase Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) student Quartermaster First Class (QM1) Joel Kay's parachute gear is inspected by an instructor at the Army Airborne School prior to boarding the aircraft. Each student undergoes five inspections before they are allowed to jump to ensure maximum safety

Mess Management SPECIALIST SEAMAN (MSSN) Leslie Donaldson gives the new recruits of Company 215 their first taste of military inspections as she checks their new dungarees for a proper fit. Company 215 is the last company to graduate from Recruit Training Command, San Diego

AIRMAN (AN) Mary Garcia, a plane captain for Fighter Squadron 126 (VF-126), performs preflight inspections with the pilot of a TA-4J Skyhawk aircraft

AIRMAN (AN) Mary Garcia, a plane captain for Fighter Squadron 126 (VF-126), performs preflight inspections with the pilot of a TA-4J Skyhawk aircraft

AIRMAN (AN) Mary Garcia, a plane captain for Fighter Squadron 126 (VF-126), signals the pilot, Lieutenant J. P. Whatley, at the conclusion of her preflight inspections of the TA-4J Skyhawk aircraft

SENIOR AIRMAN Michael Hall of the 436th Aircraft Generation Squadron (AGS) services a bogie pitch on a C-5 Galaxy aircraft. The 436 AGS was awarded the Air Force's 1993-1994 Maintenance Effectiveness Award for demonstrating professionalism and expertise in performance of aircraft maintenance and inspections on the C-5 Galaxy

A line of USMC F/A-18Ds with pilots in their seats, (VMFA(AW)-224 (Bengals) Beaufort Marine Corps Air Station, South Carolina) perform preflight inspections before take off

End of Runway crew from the 53rd Fighter Squadron, 53rd Fighter Wing, Spangdahlem AB, Germany, perform post flight inspections of F-15 Strike Eagles returning after completion of air to ground bombing missions. Exact Date Shot Unknown

Members of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One-Thirty-Three (NMCB-133) conduct inspections of personnel in 782 field gear before they deploy to Bosnia-Herzegovina in support of Operation Joint Endeavor

Members of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133 (NMCB 133) conduct inspections of personnel in camouflage and field gear in Rota, Spain. In addition to normal field gear, members have received an additional extended cold weather clothing system prior to deployment to Bosnia and Herzegovina. NMCB 133 will deploy into Bosnia and Herzegovina as part of the NATO peace keeping mission JOINT ENDEAVOR

A loadmaster performs post-flight inspections on the front of a C-17 Globemaster III assigned to the 437th Air Wing

An F/A-18 Hornet snaps to a halt after a tail-hook on the flight deck of USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) while underway in the Arabian Gulf. The ship is in the gulf as part of an SWA build-up of forces in reaction to Iraq's refusal of U.N. sponsored weapon's inspections

The maintenance crew and the pilot in the cockpit of an F-16C Falcon from the 169th Fighter Wing complete their preflight inspections. They are preparing for a 15+ hour flight to Qatar to participate with active duty units in the Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) deployment. The F-16 is armed with AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles

Workers prepare to move the shipping container with the Cassini orbiter inside the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) for prelaunch processing, testing and integration. The <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/66-97.htm">orbiter arrived</a> at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility in a U.S. Air Force C-17 air cargo plane from Edwards Air Force Base, California. The orbiter and the Huygens probe already being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc681

Crew chiefs from the 77th Fighter Squadron, Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, conduct end-of-runway preflight inspections, of their F-16 Fighting Falcons, prior to a mission supporting the world's largest joint service, multi-national tactical air operations exercise

Workers prepare to tow away the large container with the Cassini orbiter from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The orbiter <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/66-97.htm">just arrived</a> on the U.S. Air Force C-17 air cargo plane, shown here, from Edwards Air Force Base, California. The orbiter and the Huygens probe already being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc679

Workers offload the shipping container with the Cassini orbiter from what looks like a giant shark mouth, but is really an Air Force C-17 air cargo plane which <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/66-97.htm">just landed</a> at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility from Edwards Air Force Base, California. The orbiter and the Huygens probe already being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc678

Workers prepare to move the shipping container with the Cassini orbiter inside the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) for prelaunch processing, testing and integration. The <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/66-97.htm">orbiter arrived</a> at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility in a U.S. Air Force C-17 air cargo plane from Edwards Air Force Base, California. The orbiter and the Huygens probe already being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc682

Workers begin unloading the Cassini orbiter from a U.S. Air Force C-17 air cargo plane after its <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/66-97.htm">arrival</a> at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility from Edwards Air Force Base, California. The orbiter and the Huygens probe already being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc677

Workers prepare to move the shipping container with the Cassini orbiter inside the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) for prelaunch processing, testing and integration. The <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/66-97.htm">orbiter arrived</a> at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility in a U.S. Air Force C-17 air cargo plane from Edwards Air Force Base, California. The orbiter and the Huygens probe already being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc680

An employee in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) works on the top side of the experiment platform for the Huygens probe that will accompany the Cassini orbiter to Saturn during prelaunch processing, testing and integration in that facility. The Huygens probe and the Cassini orbiter being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc730

An employee in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) sews thermal insulation material on the back cover and heat shield of the Huygens probe during prelaunch processing, testing and integration in that facility. The Huygens probe and the Cassini orbiter being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc728

A worker in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) stands behind the bottom side of the experiment platform for the Huygens probe that will accompany the Cassini orbiter to Saturn during prelaunch processing testing and integration in that facility. The Huygens probe and the Cassini orbiter being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc732

Employees in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) lower the upper experiment module and base of the Cassini orbiter onto a work stand during prelaunch processing, testing and integration work in that facility. The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc726

An employee in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) sews thermal insulation material on the front heat shield of the Huygens probe during prelaunch processing testing and integration in that facility, with the probe’s back cover in the background. The Huygens probe and the Cassini orbiter being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc729

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) stand around the upper experiment module and base of the Cassini orbiter during prelaunch processing, testing and integration in that facility. The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc731

Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) perform checkouts of the upper experiment module and base of the Cassini orbiter during prelaunch processing, testing and integration in that facility. The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe being processed at KSC are the two primary components of the Cassini spacecraft, which will be launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Station. Cassini will explore Saturn, its rings and moons for four years. The Huygens probe, designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA), will be deployed from the orbiter to study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The orbiter was designed and assembled at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Following postflight inspections, integration of the 12 science instruments not already installed on the orbiter will be completed. Then, the parabolic high-gain antenna and the propulsion module will be mated to the orbiter, followed by the Huygens probe, which will complete spacecraft integration. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch to begin its 6.7-year journey to the Saturnian system. Arrival at the planet is expected to occur around July 1, 2004 KSC-97pc727

Aerial view of the Air Transportable Hospital located near the flight line. The one-of-a-kind hospital was constructed at this Air Combat Command base for use during exercises and operational readiness inspections

Interior view of an operating room in the Air Transportable Hospital. The one-of-a-kind hospital was constructed at this Air Combat Command base for use during exercises and operational readiness inspections

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis rolls out of the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its journey to the Shuttle Landing Facility where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis will then be ferried to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1662

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis rolls from the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its journey to the Shuttle Landing Facility where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis will then be ferried to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1663

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis sits under the Mate/Demate Device at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility, where it will be lifted and mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale's Orbiter Assembly Facility where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis' future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis' next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1664

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Atlantis sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to California for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1665

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, riding atop the modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, departed Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at 1:53 p.m. on Nov. 11 en route to Palmdale, Calif., for the planned Orbiter Maintenance Down Period. Atlantis departed from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33 for Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1667

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis, riding atop the modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, departed Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on Nov. 11 at 1:53 p.m. en route to Palmdale, Calif., for its planned Orbiter Maintenance Down Period. Atlantis departed from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33 for Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. At Palmdale, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1668

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft at Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC’s) Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis is being prepared for its ferry flight to Palmdale, Calif., for its Orbiter Maintenance Down Period at Palmdale’s Orbiter Assembly Facility, where it will remain until August 1998. There, modifications and structural inspections will be conducted in preparation for Atlantis’ future missions to support International Space Station assembly activities. Atlantis’ next flight into space is scheduled to be Space Shuttle mission STS-92, targeted for launch from KSC in January 1999 KSC-97PC1666

Aviation Ordananceman 3rd Class Brian Skvoretz and Aviation Ordananceman PO3 Robert Alverson move an AIM-54C Phoenix long range air-to-air missile across the flight deck during preparations for flight operations aboard USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73). George Washington is in the Persian Gulf to provide forward presence following Iraqs refusal to comply with UN weapons inspections

The Ticonderoga class cruiser USS NORMANDY (CG 60) underway in the Arabian Sea. Normandy is part of the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) battle group and is headed for the Persian Gulf to provide added forward presence in the Gulf region, following Iraqs refusal to comply with UN weapons inspections

The ticonderoga class cruiser USS NORMANDY (CG 60) underway in the Arabian Sea. Normandy is part of the aircraft carrier USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) battle group and is headed for the Persian Gulf to provide added forward presence in the Gulf region under Operation Southern Watch following Iraq's refusal to comply with UN weapon's inspections

On board the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS GEORGE WAHINGTON (CVN 73). US Navy crew members work on F/A-18C Hornets, from Carrier Air Wing One. The GEORGE WASHINGTON Battle Group and her embarked air wing departed their regularly scheduled deployment in the Mediterranean to provide added forward presence in the Persina Gulf region, following Iraqs refusal to comply with UN weapons inspections. Operation SOUTHERN WATCH, 20 November 1997

Donned in Chemical Protective Overgarments members of a Chemical, Biological, Radiation investigative team search compartments for possible contamination during a General Quarters Drill aboard USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73). The George Washington is providing added forward presence in the Gulf region following Iraqs refusal to comply with UN weapons inspections

US Navy Boatswain's Mate Second Class John R. DesChamps Jr. loads machinery onto the Landing Dock Ship, USS OAK HILL (LSD 51) with the ship's crane while preparing for departure from a Kuwaiti port. The ship is in Kuwait as part of an Southwest Asia build-up of forces in response to Iraq's refusal of U.N. sponsored weapons inspections

US Navy Boatswain's Mate Second Class John R. DesChamps Jr. loads machinery onto the Landing Dock Ship, USS OAK HILL (LSD 51) with the ship's crane while preparing for departure from a Kuwaiti port. The ship is in Kuwait as part of an Southwast Asia build-up of forces in response to Iraq's refusal of U.N. sponsored weapons inspections

US Navy aircraft maintenance technicians preform routine pre-flight inspections on A-6B Prowler, in the foreground, and a F-14 Tomcat, in the background, aboard the Forrestal Class Aircraft Carrier, USS INDEPENDENCE (CV 62). The INDEPENDENCE is in the Persian Gulf taking part in the Southwast Asia build-up

The Austin Class, Amphibious Transport Dock Ship, USS SHREVEPORT (LPD 12) is moored alongside a Kuwaiti pier, providing the fire-power of an amphibious assault ship and its Marine Corps bretheren. The ship was sent to Kuwait as part of an Southwest Asia build-up of forces in response to Iraq's refusal of U.N. sponsored weapons inspections

Shadows at sunrise leave the Whidbey Island Class Dock Landing Ship, USS ASHLAND (LSD 48) as US Marines prepare to load up their weapons and machinery (not shown) to leave the port of Kuwait for home. The USS ASHLAND is in Kuwait as part of a Southwest Asia build-up of forces in response to Iraq's refusal of U.N. sponsored weapons inspections

A US Navy Landing Craft Utility (LCU 1655) pulls up to a ramp at a Kuwaiti port to load up US Marine equipment (not shown) bound for the USS ASHLAND (LSD 48) (Not shown) for a return trip home to Virginia. The Marines traveled to Kuwait as part of an Southwest Asia build-up of forces in response to Iraq's refusal of U.N. sponsored weapons inspections