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Window bow window insight, architecture buildings.

Window bow window insight, architecture buildings.

Kranhaus detail view details, architecture buildings.

Kranhaus detail view details, architecture buildings.

Window bow window insight, architecture buildings.

Window bow window insight, architecture buildings.

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Iran esfahan bridge, places monuments.

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Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

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Window bow window insight, architecture buildings.

Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

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Window decoration display dummy, beauty fashion.

Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

Reichstag berlin government, architecture buildings.

A poem, on the joyful news of the Rev. Mr. Whitefield’s visit in Boston. Dedicated to all the true friends of such “an examplary Christian, fine gentleman and accomplished orator, who has discover’d in some late sermons such a deep insight into

A poem, on the joyful news of the Rev. Mr. Whitefield’s visit in Boston. Dedicated to all the true friends of such “an examplary Christian, fine gentleman and accomplished orator, who has discover’d in some late sermons such a deep insight into

Major General Walter Yates, the Deputy Commander for USAREUR FWD (left), along with General William Hartzog, the TRADOC Commander(center), and the Deputy CHIEF of STAFF for Training, Major General Carl Ernst, sit in the tactical operations center on Taszar main to receive mission briefs and gain insight to US Operations in Hungary during Operation Joint Endeavor

Major General Walter Yates, the Deputy Commander for USAREUR FWD (left), along with General William Hartzog, the TRADOC Commander(center), and the Deputy CHIEF of STAFF for Training, Major General Carl Ernst, sit in the tactical operations center on Taszar main to receive mission briefs and gain insight to US Operations in Hungary during Operation Joint Endeavor

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., secure the Cassini spacecraft to its launch vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The adapter will later be mated to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. The mechanic in the crane lift at right is assisting in exact positioning of the spacecraft for precise fitting. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. Scientific instruments carried aboard the spacecraft will study Saturn’s atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and several moons. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1111

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion  Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., secure the Cassini spacecraft to its launch vehicle  adapter in KSC’s  Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The adapter will later be mated  to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. The  mechanic in the crane lift at right is assisting in exact positioning of the spacecraft for  precise fitting. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission seeks insight into the  origins and evolution of the early solar system. Scientific instruments carried aboard the  spacecraft will study Saturn’s atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and several moons. JPL  is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1111

The main engine thruster nozzles of the Cassini spacecraft have their covers removed prior to the securing of the craft to its launch vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The main engines of Cassini will be used for Deep Space Maneuver burns, which will be performed periodically throughout its cruise to Saturn to keep the spacecraft on the correct trajectory. Large maneuvers (such as a change in spacecraft speed of about one meter per second or higher) will be done with the main engine, whereas smaller maneuvers will be performed by the thrusters and/or reaction wheels. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. It will take seven years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn KSC-97PC1107

The main engine thruster nozzles of the Cassini  spacecraft have their covers removed prior to the securing of the craft to its launch  vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The main engines of  Cassini will be used for Deep Space Maneuver burns, which will be performed  periodically throughout its cruise to Saturn to keep the spacecraft on the correct  trajectory. Large maneuvers (such as a change in spacecraft speed of about one meter per  second or higher) will be done with the main engine, whereas smaller maneuvers will be  performed by the thrusters and/or reaction wheels. Scheduled for launch in October, the  Cassini mission seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. It  will take seven years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn KSC-97PC1107

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., lower the Cassini spacecraft onto its launch vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The adapter will later be mated to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission, a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. It will take seven years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1110

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion  Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., lower the Cassini spacecraft onto its launch vehicle  adapter in KSC’s  Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The adapter will later be mated  to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space.  Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission, a joint US-European four-year  orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons,  seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. It will take seven  years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1110

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., inspect their work after mating the Cassini spacecraft to its launch vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The adapter will later be mated to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission, a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. It will take seven years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1109

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion  Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., inspect their work after mating the Cassini  spacecraft to its launch vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility.  The adapter will later be mated to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will  lift Cassini into space. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission, a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its  rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system.  It will take seven years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn. JPL is managing the Cassini  project for NASA KSC-97PC1109

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., lift the Cassini spacecraft along with its launch vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The black conical-shaped adapter seen at the bottom of the spacecraft will later be mated to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. Scientific instruments carried aboard the spacecraft will study Saturn’s atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and several moons. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1112

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion  Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., lift the Cassini spacecraft along with its launch  vehicle adapter in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The black conical-shaped adapter seen at the bottom of the spacecraft will later be mated to a Titan  IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. Scheduled for  launch in October, the Cassini mission seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the  early solar system. Scientific instruments carried aboard the spacecraft will study Saturn’s  atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and several moons. JPL is managing the Cassini  project for NASA KSC-97PC1112

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., work on the lifting fixture that picks up the Cassini spacecraft in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The orbiter alone weighs about 4,750 pounds (2,150 kilograms). At launch, the combined orbiter, Huygens probe, launch vehicle adapter, and propellants will weigh about 12,346 pounds (5,600 kilograms). Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission, a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1108

Flight mechanics from NASA’s Jet Propulsion  Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., work on the lifting fixture that picks up the Cassini  spacecraft in KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The orbiter alone weighs  about 4,750 pounds (2,150 kilograms). At launch, the combined orbiter, Huygens probe,  launch vehicle adapter, and propellants will weigh about 12,346 pounds (5,600  kilograms). Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission, a joint US-European  four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its  moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. JPL is  managing the Cassini project for NASA KSC-97PC1108

The Cassini spacecraft awaits placement of its payload fairing at Launch Pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) to protect Cassini during launch. Scheduled for launch in mid-October, the Cassini mission is a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Cassini project KSC-11415f07

The Cassini spacecraft awaits placement of its payload fairing at Launch Pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) to protect Cassini during launch. Scheduled for launch in mid-October, the Cassini mission is a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Cassini project KSC-11415f07

The Cassini spacecraft awaits placement of its payload fairing at Launch Pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) to protect Cassini during launch. Scheduled for launch in mid-October, the Cassini mission is a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Cassini project KSC-11415f06

The Cassini spacecraft awaits placement of its payload fairing at Launch Pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) to protect Cassini during launch. Scheduled for launch in mid-October, the Cassini mission is a joint US-European four-year orbital surveillance of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere, its rings, and its moons, seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Cassini project KSC-11415f06

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director James W. Kennedy addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1110

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director James W. Kennedy addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1110

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1114

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1114

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1116

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1116

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The panel members participating in the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting entertain questions and comments from the audience assembled in the Training Auditorium. From left, they are James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. KSC-04pd1121

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The panel members participating in the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting entertain questions and comments from the audience assembled in the Training Auditorium. From left, they are James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. KSC-04pd1121

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The panel members participating in the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting entertain questions and comments from the audience assembled in the Training Auditorium. From left, they are James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. KSC-04pd1122

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The panel members participating in the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting entertain questions and comments from the audience assembled in the Training Auditorium. From left, they are James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. KSC-04pd1122

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1115

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1115

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings (left), Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management, looks on as Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight, responds to a question asked by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1126

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings (left), Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management, looks on as Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight, responds to a question asked by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1126

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management, looks on as James W. Kennedy, KSC director, answers a question raised by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1125

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Jennings (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management, looks on as James W. Kennedy, KSC director, answers a question raised by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1125

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC employees assemble in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Panel members included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at the Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1113

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC employees assemble in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Panel members included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at the Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1113

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1120

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1120

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lynn Cline (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight, looks on as James W. Kennedy (left), KSC director, and Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management, take questions from the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC, and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1124

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Lynn Cline (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight, looks on as James W. Kennedy (left), KSC director, and Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management, take questions from the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC, and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1124

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1118

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1118

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC employees assemble in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Panel members included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at the Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1112

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- KSC employees assemble in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Panel members included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at the Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1112

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1119

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1119

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1117

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1117

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director James W. Kennedy addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1111

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director James W. Kennedy addresses KSC employees assembled in the Training Auditorium for a Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other participants included Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. Following their remarks, members of the panel entertained questions and comments from the audience. KSC-04pd1111

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lynn Cline (left), Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight, looks on as Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC, answers a question posed by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1123

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Lynn Cline (left), Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight, looks on as Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC,  answers a question posed by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1123

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A KSC employee asks a question of the panel conducting the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Panel members included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at the Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1127

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A KSC employee asks a question of the panel conducting the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium.  The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Panel members included James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight; Bob Sieck, former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC; and Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at the Johnson Space Center. KSC-04pd1127

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Bob Sieck (left), former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC, looks on as Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center, responds to a question asked by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; and Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight. KSC-04pd1128

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Bob Sieck (left), former Director of Space Shuttle Processing at KSC, looks on as Jim Wetherbee, astronaut and Technical Assistant to the Director of Safety and Mission Assurance at Johnson Space Center, responds to a question asked by a member of the audience attending the Culture Change Process All Hands Meeting in the Training Auditorium. The purpose of the meeting was for employees to gain further insight into the Agency’s Vision for Space Exploration and the direction cultural change will take at KSC in order to assume its role within this vision. Other panel members were James W. Kennedy, KSC director; Jim Jennings, Deputy Associate Administrator for Institutions and Asset Management; and Lynn Cline, Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight. KSC-04pd1128

Safety Day Events 2008 Keynote speaker at the !0th Annual Safety Awareness Week Lt Col Wes Sharp shares his reveting account of an F-18 midair collision, his insight into the root cause, lessons he learned and how to excell under pressure to perform. ARC-2008-ACD08-0201-006

Safety Day Events 2008 Keynote speaker at the !0th Annual Safety Awareness Week Lt Col Wes Sharp shares his reveting account of an F-18 midair collision, his insight into the root cause, lessons he learned and how to excell under pressure to perform. ARC-2008-ACD08-0201-006

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the shipping container cover is lifted from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4016

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the shipping container cover is lifted from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4016

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers secure an overhead crane to the shipping container that holds NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4014

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers secure an overhead crane to the shipping container that holds NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4014

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the shipping container cover is lifted from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4015

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the shipping container cover is lifted from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4015

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The shipping container with NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, arrives at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4013

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The shipping container with NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO,  arrives at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.   SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4013

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, remains on the transporter after the shipping cover was removed. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4018

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, remains on the transporter after the shipping cover was removed.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4018

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the shipping container cover removed from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (right), or SDO, is moved away. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4017

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the shipping container cover removed from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (right), or SDO, is moved away.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-4017

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers move a work stand into position to hold NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in the background. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4027

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers move a work stand into position to hold NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in the background. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4027

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a hoist is attached to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in order to lift and rotate it. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4020

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a hoist is attached to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in order to lift and rotate it.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4020

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, rests on a work stand after its lift and rotation. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, rests on a work stand after its lift and rotation.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers maneuver the position of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after its rotation. The SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4025

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers maneuver the position of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after its rotation.  The SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4025

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers check the progress of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, as an overhead cable lowers it onto the work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4030

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers check the progress of  NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, as an overhead cable lowers it onto the work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4030

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers stand by as a hoist moves NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, from its transporter. SDO will be rotated and moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4021

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers stand by as a hoist moves NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, from its transporter.  SDO will be rotated and moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4021

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers ensure the smooth rotation of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. After rotation, the SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4023

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers ensure the smooth rotation of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  After rotation, the SDO will be moved to a work stand.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4023

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a hoist is attached to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in order to lift and rotate it. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4019

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a hoist is attached to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in order to lift and rotate it.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4019

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers ensure the smooth rotation of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. After rotation, the SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4024

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers ensure the smooth rotation of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  After rotation, the SDO will be moved to a work stand.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4024

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., an overhead cable moves NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, toward the work stand in the foreground. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4029

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  an overhead cable moves  NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, toward the work stand in the foreground.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4029

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers check the fittings of the hoist supporting NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after its rotation. The SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4026

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., workers check the fittings of the hoist supporting NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after its rotation.  The SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4026

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., an overhead cable lifts NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, to place it on the work stand in the foreground. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4028

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  an overhead cable lifts NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, to place it on the work stand in the foreground.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4028

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a hoist begins rotating NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. After rotation, the SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO will be rotated and moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4022

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a hoist begins rotating NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  After rotation, the SDO will be moved to a work stand. SDO will be rotated and moved to a work stand. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.   Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2009-4022

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the protective cover around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4035

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the protective cover around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4035

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the protective cover around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4034

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the protective cover around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4034

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the protective cover from the solar panel on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4039

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the protective cover from the solar panel on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4039

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the final portions of the protective cover wrapped around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4040

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove the final portions of the protective cover wrapped around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4040

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is revealed after removal of the protective cover used for shipping. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4041

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is revealed after removal of the protective cover used for shipping.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4041

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians begin removing the protective cover around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4033

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians begin removing the protective cover around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4033

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is ready to be unveiled with removal of the protective cover used during shipping. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4032

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is ready to be unveiled with removal of the protective cover used during shipping.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4032

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a technician checks the antenna on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after the protective cover was removed. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4038

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a technician checks the antenna on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after the protective cover was removed. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4038

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a technician checks a solar array on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after the protective cover was removed. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4042

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a technician checks a solar array on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, after the protective cover was removed. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4042

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a technician removes part of the protective cover from the solar panel on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4037

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a technician removes part of the protective cover from the solar panel on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4037

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove portions of the protective cover wrapped around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4036

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., technicians remove portions of the protective cover wrapped around NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-4036

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the lowered high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory will allow engineers access to the battery compartment in order to install the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4067

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  the lowered high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory will allow engineers access to the battery compartment in order to install the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4067

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., work to lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Lowering the antenna will provide access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4062

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., work to lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory.  Lowering the antenna will provide access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4062

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to gain access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4065

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to gain access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4065

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., support the high-gain antenna lowered to allow access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4066

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  support the high-gain antenna lowered to allow access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4066

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., begin work to lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Lowering the antenna will provide access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4060

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., begin work to lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory.  Lowering the antenna will provide access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4060

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., begin work to lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Lowering the antenna will provide access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4061

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., begin work to lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory.  Lowering the antenna will provide access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4061

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to gain access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4064

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  lower the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to gain access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4064

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Solar Dynamics Observatory sits on a stand at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla. Engineers will lower the high-gain antenna to access the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4059

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Solar Dynamics Observatory sits on a stand at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.  Engineers will lower the high-gain antenna to access the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4059

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., begin lowering the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to gain access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4063

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla.,  begin lowering the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to gain access to the battery compartment for installation of the flight battery. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.     Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4063

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is rotated on a Ransome table. The rotation will allow access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4270

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is  rotated on a Ransome table.  The rotation will allow access to different areas of the spacecraft.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4270

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is lowered onto the Ransome table. The table will be used to rotate the spacecraft in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4268

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is  lowered onto the Ransome table.  The table will be used to rotate the spacecraft in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4268

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is lowered onto the Ransome table. The table will be used to rotate the spacecraft in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4269

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is  lowered onto the Ransome table.  The table will be used to rotate the spacecraft in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4269

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is lifted from the work stand under the guidance of technicians. The spacecraft is being moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4265

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is lifted from the work stand under the guidance of technicians. The spacecraft is being moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4265

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., technicians check the Solar Dynamics Observatory after it was lifted from its work stand. The spacecraft is being moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4266

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  technicians check the Solar Dynamics Observatory after it was lifted from its work stand.  The spacecraft is being moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4266

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is moved across the floor toward the Ransome table in the background. The table will be used to rotate the spacecraft in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4267

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is  moved across the floor toward the Ransome table in the background.  The table will be used to rotate the spacecraft in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4267

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is rotated on a Ransome table to a horizontal position. The rotation will allow access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4272

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is  rotated on a Ransome table to a horizontal position.  The rotation will allow access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4272

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is fitted with a crane to lift it from the work stand. The spacecraft will be moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4262

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is fitted with a crane to lift it from the work stand.  The spacecraft will be moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4262

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., technicians check the clearance as the Solar Dynamics Observatory is lifted from the stand. The spacecraft is being moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4264

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., technicians check the clearance as the Solar Dynamics Observatory is lifted from the stand.  The spacecraft is being moved onto a Ransome table that will allow it to be rotated in various directions for access to different areas of the spacecraft.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4264

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory is rotated on a Ransome table. The rotation will allow access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4271

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility in Titusville, Fla.,  the Solar Dynamics Observatory is  rotated on a Ransome table.  The rotation will allow access to different areas of the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for its anticipated November launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4271

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., an engineer monitors the movement, or gimbaling, of the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4591

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., an engineer monitors the movement, or gimbaling, of the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4591

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is undergoing performance testing. Seen here is the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4588

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is undergoing performance testing.  Seen here is the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly.  All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4588

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is moved, or gimbaled, during performance testing. All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4590

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is moved, or gimbaled, during performance testing.  All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4590

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is undergoing performance testing. The high-gain antenna seen at center left will be moved, or gimbaled. All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4587

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is undergoing performance testing.  The  high-gain antenna seen at center left will be moved, or gimbaled.  All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4587

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., an engineer monitors the movement, or gimbaling, of the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4589

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., an engineer monitors the movement, or gimbaling, of the high-gain antenna on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.  All of the spacecraft science instruments are being tested in their last major evaluation before launch.  SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program.  The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth.  In preparation for launch, engineers will perform a battery of comprehensive tests to ensure SDO can withstand the stresses and vibrations of the launch itself, as well as what it will encounter in the space environment after launch.  Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Dec. 4.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-4589

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is moved toward a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5301

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is moved toward a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks.    SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5301

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., workers prepare a work stand for the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks on the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5303

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., workers prepare a work stand for the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks on the spacecraft.    SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5303

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., a crane prepares to lift the vertically positioned Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, onto a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5296

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., a crane prepares to lift the vertically positioned Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, onto a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks.    SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5296

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., workers position the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, onto a work stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks on the spacecraft. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5304

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., workers position the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, onto a work stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks on the spacecraft.    SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5304

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is moved toward a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5299

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is moved toward a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks.    SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5299

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., workers monitor the progress of the transfer of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, onto a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks. SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5300

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., workers monitor the progress of the transfer of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, onto a test stand during preparations for propulsion system testing and leak checks.    SDO is the first space weather research network mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information about changes in the sun's magnetic field and insight into how they affect Earth. Liftoff on an Atlas V rocket is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller KSC-2009-5300